Viewing 23 posts - 41 through 63 (of 63 total)
  • Dual crown enduro – the future or OTT and marketing
  • Premier Icon squirrelking
    Free Member

    Who is going to break the barrier and release the first £2000 dual crown enduro fork?

    I mean, the Intend Bandit is €1999 with 1.5 crowns, the Infinity USD DC is only 215g heavier than a Zeb, adjustable down from 215mm travel and €2099. Add duty and such and it’s probably over the line.

    Premier Icon tetrode
    Full Member

    Three guys I know already have dual crowns on their geometrons and have had no issues with turning the bike or denting the frame when they’ve crashed. Pretty sure those concerns are quite overblown.

    Premier Icon P-Jay
    Free Member

    It’s been a long long time since I owned a bike with DC, but I rented a DH bike in 2019 to try to relive my form glory DH days (there was never any glory, not even for a second). Short of perhaps trying to do a track stand in the carpark, running out of turning circle isn’t really a thing.

    I think, rather than the knee-jerk reaction when someone tries something ‘new’ that it’s all a load of marketing bullshit and ‘the industry’ is going to force us all to buy DC forks like we’re nothing but slaves to the advertising, take it at it’s merit. So it’s a 170mm fork that’s lighter than a Zeb, sounds good to me. Whether that’s because it’s a super tricked out prototype or down to fundamentals only time will tell I guess.

    Spesh of course tried with their proprietary Future Shock forks 15 years ago, they didn’t fail because they were DC, they failed because they horribly unreliable.

    I’m sure there would be some benefits for Fox and RS too, it must be getting harder to justify R&D for DH forks when they’re probably selling fewer and fewer to the public, a DC fork that punters will actually buy that’s closely related to the ones used in the Halo race series sounds like a winner to me.

    Premier Icon honourablegeorge
    Full Member

    tetrode

    Three guys I know already have dual crowns on their geometrons and have had no issues with turning the bike or denting the frame when they’ve crashed. Pretty sure those concerns are quite overblown.

    There’s a world of difference between a Geometron and a carbon Yeti – Geometron were always built with triple clamps in mind. Yetis have been known to shear headtubes clean off with just regular forks

    Premier Icon joefm
    Free Member

    Looked like Lachlan Blair wasn’t using them this weekend from his IG pics?

    I see the advantages though. Back when I had boxxers I never understood Totems and the like as they were practically as heavy and looked very flexible. They’re clearly searching for more stiffness hence, 38s and Zebs with their wider tubes.

    turning circle really isnt an issue when riding and never had an issue with DC’s although I never rode uphill so tight uphill bends may be an issue but you’re not buying DC’s to set uphill KOM’s.

    Premier Icon peaslaker
    Free Member

    Zero stack anglesets on their way as well.

    Premier Icon squirrelking
    Free Member

    Yetis have been known to shear headtubes clean off with just regular forks

    In which case they get filed under shite bikes no right thinking person should buy.

    Premier Icon mashr
    Free Member

    I’m sure there would be some benefits for Fox and RS too

    of course because “mtb”, RS actually had the perfect fork years ago in the Boxxer Ride U-turn. The U-turn wouldn’t be needed, but it was just a slightly lower travel Boxxer Team otherwise

    Premier Icon StuE
    Full Member

    Knock block on some Trek bikes limits how far you can turn the bars possibly more than dc forks and it doesn’t seem to have been an issue

    Premier Icon 5lab
    Free Member

    the speccy enduro evo expert came with a (stock) 180mm boxxer a few years ago. Looked mint too..

    Premier Icon sharkattack
    Free Member

    Dual crown forks make so much sense on bikes like that. I for one welcome our new triple clamped overlords.

    Premier Icon mrdestructo
    Full Member

    The weight of a dual crown would make for slow inclines.

    I used to ride 5″ & 7″ Jnr Ts, and Shiver DCs. But only on bikes/rides where I would pedal a few times then drop off something, or point downhill and bounce around like in a pinball machine. I’d normally be walking up any hill I needed to get up.

    Premier Icon jamiemcf
    Full Member

    I welcome it. I’ll just need to get out more. No more squeezing CSUs.

    Premier Icon sharkattack
    Free Member

    The weight of a dual crown would make for slow inclines.

    Why?

    Do you realise that the Shiver DC came out 20 years ago?

    If I had to guess at the kind of bike you were riding back then I’d suggest it probably wasn’t just the fork which made it unpleasant for climbing.

    Premier Icon mashr
    Free Member

    The weight of a dual crown would make for slow inclines.

    you do realise the Formulas that kicked off this thread are lighter the the RS/Fox single crown equivalents?

    Premier Icon squirrelking
    Free Member

    Plus, Shivers were heavy even for their time. My Super T’s are about 3kg but that’s fully coil sprung and HSCV in both legs. As I said earlier in the thread, one leg is essentially redundant so you could modernise it just by moving spring and control to seperate legs and save a load of weight that way. The 7″ frame it’s on also weighs more than my “new” DH bike.

    Premier Icon tetrode
    Full Member

    you do realise the Formulas that kicked off this thread are lighter the the RS/Fox single crown equivalents?

    That would require actually reading instead of an immediate knee-jerk reaction!

    I’m sure when 29ers were first introduced people were harping on about it being all OTT and marketing balls, same with rear suspension, disc brakes etc. It’s always the case.

    Since I live quite close to Geometron HQ and they’re the Formula distributors in the UK, I am absolutely going to see if I can demo their enduro dual crown once it’s out.

    Premier Icon jamj1974
    Full Member

    I seem to remember having a dual-crown and light fork in 2007… Specialized e150SL anyone! Post-tuning, they were a well-damped, predictable fork that resisted twist. Seems like we are going back full-circle, somewhat.

    Premier Icon Northwind
    Full Member

    mrdestructo
    Free Member

    The weight of a dual crown would make for slow inclines.

    Nah. We’re talking pretty small amounts here, no different from say going from a 34 to a 36, or fitting a coil, you don’t suddenly go oooooh this climb is so slow.

    mashr
    Free Member

    you do realise the Formulas that kicked off this thread are lighter the the RS/Fox single crown equivalents?

    Is it? It’s been described as “lighter than some single crown fork”, but are they equivalents?

    mashr
    Free Member

    RS actually had the perfect fork years ago in the Boxxer Ride U-turn. The U-turn wouldn’t be needed, but it was just a slightly lower travel Boxxer Team otherwise

    It was, let’s be honest, a bit shit. The first lyrik came along what, 2 years later and was a ridiculously better fork

    Premier Icon tomhoward
    Full Member

    Seems like we are going back full-circle, somewhat

    Not possible, due to the stanchions, silly.

    Premier Icon benpinnick
    Full Member

    Is it? It’s been described as “lighter than some single crown fork”, but are they equivalents?

    Its lighter than the 38mm forks from RS and Fox. Whether you consider it equivalent is of course up to you but it offers the same travel, and probably better stiffness.

    Premier Icon mashr
    Free Member

    Northwind
    Full Member
    It was, let’s be honest, a bit shit. The first lyrik came along what, 2 years later and was a ridiculously better fork

    I think your Lyrik-tinted sunnies are getting in the way. It was a (MoCo, including Floodgate) Boxxer Team with 22mm less travel, it was great. I had the Team and the other half had the Ride. I’ve seen reports of the U-turns self adjusting, but as ours never did it I can’t really comment. Not sure why you think the, also MoCo, Lyrik was better?

    OTOH if you’re thinking of the original/older version of the Ride, then you are onto something

    Premier Icon Northwind
    Full Member

    mashr
    Free Member

    I think your Lyrik-tinted sunnies are getting in the way. It was a (MoCo, including Floodgate) Boxxer Team with 22mm less travel, it was great. I had the Team and the other half had the Ride.

    Nah, I had the Ride (and a late model 32 Team in my 224), it was an ancient chassis with a basic damper in, even with the revised rebound the moco wasn’t really up to the job. The lyrik with mission control was like a fork from the future in comparison. (and of course was a very close relative of the first 35mm Boxxer).

    Put it another way, that first lyrik still stands up as a good fork today. The chassis is super heavy but the damper was superb. The disappontment when I “upgraded” to a 35mm charger Pike was huge, so I went back to the Lyriks and kept them right up until I went 29er. And I’m still using a set of mission control Boxxers so there’s no rose tinted glasses there.

    Course, the 2-step air exploded instantly on literally every lyrik but you can’t have everything.

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