drop bars on touring type bike

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  • drop bars on touring type bike
  • I’m currently building a mix of a bike, using some bit’s I already have and buying some new.

    It’s an MTB frame that will be running a triple 10sp road drive train, BB7’s and probably 26″ wheel (for now). I need to buy a set of bars but have absolutely no idea what I should be looking for.

    I’ve seen the salsa bell laps that look good but any other recommendations? not looking to spend too much.

    cheers

    I started off with Butterfly bars on my surly, but just could not get them set up correctly. Cables off at weird angles and really just far too upright a riding position.

    I changed to Nitto Randonneurs and haven’t looked back since. They sweep up a bit on the tops and flare out on the drops. Very comfortable with Specialized bar phat and far more hand positions than I could use on butterfly bars.

    thomthumb
    Member

    It’s an MTB frame

    does it fit you? you might need to do something weird with the stem to make drop bars fit.

    my road bikes are ~ 30mm shorter in ett.

    OnOne Midge bars are best value imo. i have used Bell Laps but tbh they don’t really flare our that much, try their new Cowbells if your after Salsa bars, or the Woodchipper.

    i have thought about using a Jones/Titec style bar as they look like they’d be comfy but then i wouldn’t be able to use a bar bag.

    i have Midges on my Sabbath and Cowbells on the crosser

    druidh
    Member

    Salsa Woodchippers are a good option

    Premier Icon cynic-al
    Subscriber

    THere’s tons of choice and it’s personal what works for you.

    I’d try std compact drops. What shifters are you using? You do know road sti does not work with mtb front mech?

    Thanks for the suggestions. I recon I’ll get the position sorted as I have a variety of stems to try but neet some bars to figure it out with.

    I’ll be using road 105 sti’s. Is that definate that an mtb front mech won’t work as I’ve read varying reviews. Some say it does work but not perfectly?

    Premier Icon cynic-al
    Subscriber

    I’ve never seen it work.

    Premier Icon aracer
    Member

    I have an MTB front mech with 9sp 105 STIs on my crosser. To be fair it’s not a very modern MTB mech – it’s a Deore LX, which dates it enough – for those wanting a precise date, it’s marked as an M550. Also designed to work with standard MTB chainrings (ie 46T big ring). However it might be old, but it’s a top swing, with similar looking geometry to modern stuff.

    What isn’t mentioned is what chainset you’re using – if you’re using road sized rings as would be normal for a road tourer then you want a road front mech.

    As for the original question and most of the responses, the question should surely be “drop bars on MTBers touring bike”. I have standard drops on mine, as do most other people I’ve seen – it’s what comes as standard on bikes sold for touring.

    looks like I’ll need a road front mech then. It will be a 105 chainset.

    Premier Icon aracer
    Member

    Yep – a MTB front mech won’t match the curve of the big ring on a road chainset. Road mech is the easy answer.

    One other thing to check though – a MTB frame is designed for MTB chainset – you need to check you have chainstay clearance for the bigger rings.

    Just checked and the inner ring fouls the chainstays. what’s the answer? smaller inner ring?

    the chainset axle seems a tad short for the 73mm bb.

    best bet to put some 10 speed rings on my mtb cranks?

    druidh
    Member

    CokeItUpAndWatchItSmoke – Member
    Just checked and the inner ring fouls the chainstays. what’s the answer?

    Buy a touring frame?

    probably cheaper but I’ll persevere.

    Road chainsets are designed to fit 68mm BB shells with no spacers. So they wont fit your mtb frame.

    MTB chainsets have a different BCD to road chainsets, and also a different Q factor (I dont even really know what this means but it may affect the front shifting)

    Premier Icon Dickyboy
    Subscriber

    MTB front shifters have different pull ratios to road front shifters so you will need a road front mech matched to a road shifter (rear mechs are mix & match though).
    Also std road chainline is 45mm whereas mtb chainline is 50mm, which is another reason why mechs won’t mix & match – and why larger rings may be fouling the chainstay. If its an older octalink or square taper chainset it may be possible to get away with a different length botoom bracket instead though to alter the chainline & clearance to suit
    Best bet is to get a touring frame to start with

    thomthumb
    Member

    best bet to put some 10 speed rings on my mtb cranks?

    double will be fine. triple might cause issues. (that can be bodged)

    (rear mechs are mix & match though)

    is that true of 10 speed? i thought 10speed road required 9speed mtb mech?

    ianven
    Member

    Re drop bars, I tried them on my single speed road bike but couldn’t get on with them. The front end seemed too twitchy because of the added distance from the hoods to the steerer tube. I’ve gone back to straight bars with bar ends. Bought the drop bar second hand so haven’t lost much cash trying

    Premier Icon aracer
    Member

    is that true of 10 speed? i thought 10speed road required 9speed mtb mech?

    Not true of 10 speed. It’s even worse than that – it depends what generation of 10 speed road. Older stuff needs a 9sp MTB mech, newer stuff works with 10sp MTB.

    To the OP – if it’s only the inner ring which is a problem and not too far off, then a smaller ring might help – you should be able to put on a 26 and get it to work decently (I have 52-39-26 on the tandem).

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