Dogtrackworld.com – training advice please

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  • Dogtrackworld.com – training advice please
  • sweepy
    Member

    I couldn’t overstate the benefits of a decent dog training class, but dont just take her yourself, its the family that are getting trained as much as the dog.

    northernmatt
    Member

    Sounds like the exact same problems I’m having with my 17 month old child. Probably have different solutions though.

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    We started puppy training this week. but its mainly sit and come which we’ve already trained her on…

    5thElefant
    Member

    1) Get the kids to beat the crap out of the puppy with a rolled up newspaper. It’ll stop very quickly.

    2) Mental stimulation. Hiding treats. Rawhide bones with cheese forced into them. That’ll tire her out. Grumpy puppies are normal, as long as it’s not aggressive (otherwise see 1).

    Premier Icon flap_jack
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    Deffo NO to 1 above. Get kids to roll puppy onto his back when he does it and place hand on his chest firmly enough to keep him there without causing pain until he turns his head away. He then learns that they’re dominant over him and that his place is below them, and will stop.

    Mrs Toast
    Member

    Puppies generally learn the difference between mouthing and biting from their litter mates – if the nipped pup yelps loudly, then the nipper knows they’ve bitten too hard. Sometimes if a pup hasn’t had many litter mates, or has been taken fairly swiftly from the litter, they don’t learn this. Get your kids to do a short sharp OW at the pup each time she goes too far.

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    Hi,

    Things coming along well with new puppy and she’s settled in well, house and crate trained much more than we expected 3 weeks in.

    However…

    She’s got two minor issues I’m keen to deal with.

    1. She’s playing with the kids by nipping them to get attention. She’s fine with me but the kids she goes for their feet and clothes. We’re working to reward the behaviour we want and ignore the bad – but the kids are getting upset the puppy keep doing this.

    2. She has no grey area – she’ll either be asleep or playing and the problem is when she gets tired we only know when she starts to growl at us for no reason. Any tips on how to train her to settle when she gets tired or should we be putting her down for a nap when we see the signs or after a period of time?

    Premier Icon PePPeR
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    I’d second Mrs Toast, get the kids to yelp really loudly whenever she nips as soon as possible!

    I’d be watching the grumpiness too that’s a dominance trait, and you don’t want that developing…

    nipping just turn round stand up walk away and ignore, explain the importance to the kids. Its very common.

    Rob_S
    Member

    What Mrs Toast says.
    Worked when we adopted an 18 month old rescue dog who had spent 12 of those 18 months in the rescue and therefore had little socialising. Took a while and you feel a bit silly yelping! But it worked.

    Also as said above get some training as soon as possible. The younger they are trained the better.

    andyl
    Member

    +1 on the yelp and stop playing and act upset. It just needs to learn what is too much

    for 2 I would say get it into a routine with your walks, play and rest so it will settle into a pattern of exercise and rest. Getting it wound up in a rest phase will just leave it grumpy and unsettled when the initial excitement wears off.

    Looks like a beautiful pup.
    I agree on the yelp and then turn your back/ignore for a couple of minutes. Don’t forget they are working dogs so a bit of proper gundog training with a canvas dummy will give it some mental stimulation as well as helping with the training.
    You could also involve the kids in the sit/stay training. The dog soon learns not to try and be dominant with the person holding a treat.

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    Cheers for the advice – will continue with the yelp – my youngest (in the pic above) hasn’t quite got the idea of yelping – instead squeaks like a toy and waves here arms and legs about exciting the pup even more 🙄

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    For puppy nipping or biting just hold the pups lower jaw with your thumb in its mouth, it’ll soon get the idea – it’s unpleasant for the pup but not stresslfull or violent.

    +1 for rolling the wee fella over and holding him on his back in a submissive pose..

    Big encouragement and cheese rewards for any good behaviour worked a treat for my collie pup.

    He’s now 4 and gets many comments about his good behaviour and general loveliness 🙂

    +1 for rolling the wee fella over and holding him on his back in a submissive pose..

    I strongly disagree with this type of “training”.

    +1 for rolling the wee fella over and holding him on his back in a submissive pose..
    I strongly disagree with this type of “training”.

    Me too, it will really distress the puppy. We tried that briefly but it did more harm than good so we soon stopped it.

    We had similar problem to 1 with Dottie (Border Terrier.) What worked for us was to immediately turn around in the opposite direction with arms crossed every time she tugged on our ankles until she stopped. Do not speak or look at her. If she does it again as soon as you move then do the same. They eventually get the message. This technique works for most unwanted behaviour.

    Taylorplayer
    Member

    Go with Mrs Toast, AA etc, disregard dominance “theory” and avoid trainers who advocate dominance based methods. Here’s why:

    Back in the 1940’s, Schenkel studied wolves and published his findings. He observed that wolves live in a hierarchical society with the Alpha being the dominant wolf. David Mech later popularised this idea in one of his early books.

    And so the idea spread… dogs are descended from wolves. Wolves live in a hierarchical society, and so “we” must dominate our dogs to let them know who’s boss.

    It wasn’t Schenkel or Mech who put forward the idea of dominance “theory” with regard to dogs, it somehow became “common knowledge”.

    A few points:

    The wolves that Schenkel studied were not a wild wolf pack living in their natural environment, but captive, made up of individuals captured from different locations. Modern studies have shown that wolves live in family groups with the parents being at the head of the family.

    Schenkel misinterpreted the behaviour of the wolves he studied with regards to pinning others to the ground.

    David Mech later withdrew his support of the dominance idea.

    Also, dogs are not wolves. They are by now a separate species. To try and put a wolf’s behaviour on dogs is as ridiculous as putting dog’s behaviour on wolves. We wouldn’t bring a wolf into our homes and expect to be able to control it. Why? because a wolf is a wolf, not a dog.

    Years back (before I knew better), I pinned a young dog to the ground to show her who was boss. Quite frankly, I felt like crap afterwards. Don’t do it – it does nothing for your relationship with your dog.

    49er_Jerry
    Member

    Rewarding good behaviour is good, but also express you displeasure at unwanted behaviour.

    Verbal expression is slow and clumsy. A short sharp sound works very wells. As soon as dog does something, or appears to want to does something your are trying to prevent, a loud, gutteral sounding arrrgh works well. Dogs don’t understand words, but respond to sounds. Frequently used words are familiar sounds. Arrrgh conveys immediate displeasure.

    Try and agree and use only agreed commands when training. Praise good behaviour, chastise unwanted behaviour..

    ALWAYS praise a dogs return. NEVER scold it for coming back, even if it has been off on one. Otherwise the dog will assume that coming back to you is bad. Any bad behaviour off the lead must be addressed whilst the dog is under close control.

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    Not advocating pinning the pup down. Just rolling him over onto his back for a second or two.. No stress and it does work. I agree that pinning the wee fella to the ground would be counter productive.

    Have a look at Ceaser Milan’s book for a good read.

    My ‘naughty’ noise for Ifor is a sharp Pssst which works really well as the dog seems to hear it very quickly and there are no long vowel sounds and it can be used without passers by becoming alarmed …..
    It sometimes works with the kids too ;

    Thrustyjust
    Member

    Our Border Russell pup nips. She is getting better. We tried the yelp thing, which the father in law, who trains guide dog pups said to do. Instead of stopping it, sent her into a frenzy, with jumping and going mad. We used to say ‘ Rosie, no biting’ and put her in her crate. Sometimes holding her muzzle and saying no. Its taken time and with her issues of frustration on her broken leg, meant she had periods of pent up energy, which didn’t help. They don’t realise how sharp their first teeth are until they bite their tails or paws.
    As for grumpy, its all part of a sensible routine. Play and rest. It should become obvious on her getting tired and then crate her to let her rest for an hour or two.

    Have a look at Ceaser Milan’s book for a good read.

    I have and thought it was rubbish. The guy, whilst obviously a talented dog handler, is a dangerous idiot spouting shite imo. A dog learns good behaviour through being trained not dominated.

    Lazgoat
    Member

    We watched a load of Victoria Stillwell videos before we got our puppy. This one is bang on what you’re experiencing now.https://www.youtube.com/watchv=DwHk3o3P5cw&feature=youtube_gdata_player

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    Damn – that link doesn’t work.

    As with all training if yu use a word/sound then all must use the same word/sound and make it a single word/sound. Don’t confuse things with “Ow, no don’t do that, bad dog”.

    Dales_rider
    Member

    Some tosh there made me smile, love the folding arms touch I’m sure dogs understand that

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