Dog

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  • Dog
  • Edukator
    Member

    pin him between you and your sister to walk past a child

    I didn’t say that, please don’t put words in my mouth. My sister wasn’t with me and it was common sense to hold the dog by the collar and keep her on the other side of me as children passed. What do you do with your dog on narrow pavements and paths when other people pass you, Andy?

    andymac78
    Member

    Sorry, misread the last bit of your post. Gripping the collar will give the dog a reason to be worried. I do the same thing for any child, runner or cyclist and get my dog to sit and focus on me. Took many hours of training as a puppy but if you’re going to have or be in control of a dog that’s what it takes. I’m lucky as he’s a very smart border collie but I’ve done the same with rescue labs and terriers.

    squirrelking
    Member

    “soft mouth”

    My folks have a lab cross. Gun dogs have the job of retrieving felled birds and such so they are chosen based on the fact that they pick things up with a soft mouth (ie. carry it gently like a bitch would with her pups).

    “nipping”

    In the context I was using is a warning “bite” that leaves no marks and relatively painless (unless you’re a 3 year old who has just found out that the dog doesn’t like being pulled by her tail). Only been nipped twice and both times I thoroughly deserved it.

    Children should be taught to approach dogs with RESPECT rather than FEAR. Invade a dogs space and they will not like it however if you approach it keeping a reasonable distance then the dog will have no problems. You wouldn’t just run up to someone in the street and start hugging them and if you did you would expect a possible angry reaction, why is a dog any different?

    But then, why the **** should we teach our children respect when the world clearly owes it to them?

    Edukator
    Member

    You wouldn’t just run up to someone in the street and start hugging them

    I agree, too many dog owners think it’s ok to do just that using their dog as a proxy.

    surfer
    Member

    why is a dog any different?

    In your world maybe but your views are a bit skewed from what I have read.

    Premier Icon Cougar
    Subscriber

    Interesting thread, this. One thing I’d like to comment on though is,

    When did it become cool to blame the victim?

    [list][*]I punched my wife in the face the other day. Serves her right, she should learn not to burn dinner.[/*]

    [*]I had my phone stolen last night, it’s my own fault, I left it on the table in the pub and took my eyes off it for a minute.[/*]

    [*]My sister was raped last week, the lad said she was wearing a miniskirt, she was asking for it.[/*][/list]

    There are things you can do to minimise the risk of becoming a victim, and a lot of it boils down to common sense (and a number of people have got into hot water for daring to suggest this). You don’t walk into a rough part of town late at light waving an iPad around, as a random example. It’s “asking” for trouble.

    But, should that trouble arise, it’s not your fault. It’s not your fault that some scumbag decides to lift your iPhone to pay for his next fix, it’s not acceptable that someone should inflict violence upon someone else because of how they’re dressed. Unless you’re actively touting bother then you can be as reckless / naive as you like and without thieves, thugs and arseholes these crimes will never happen.

    Should the girl in the OP have been more careful around strange dogs? Almost certainly (assuming she even saw it, she apparently “startled” the dog, did they startle each other?) But is the girl to blame for the incident? Absolutely not, and shame on anyone who is suggesting otherwise.

    Premier Icon Woody
    Subscriber

    Dear oh dear. Sometimes it’s good to take a break from here to let the total **** sort themselves out.

    Now seems like a good time 8)

    squirrelking
    Member

    Cougar – you’re right and I don’t think anyone has suggested that the girl was to blame. I was simply replying to those who seem to think that controlling their children and not allowing themselves to be placed in a potentially bad situation is not an option. As you say, it’s common sense although that seems to be something of a rarity on here.

    Surfer, in what way are my views skewed? I would be really interested to know. Or is skewed just an arsey way of acknowleding that people have differing opinions based on their experiences?

    Edukator
    Member

    There are many public areas where dogs are allowed to run free that are also areas that children play. Your “common sense” would mean not allowing children to play freely where free dogs are present, Squirrelking. I put the rights of parents to allow kids to play above the rights of dog owners to put children in danger. The onus must always be on the dog owner to make sure their pet can never harm a child. Dog leads/muzzles are acceptable solutions, stopping children running around is not.

    Premier Icon Drac
    Subscriber

    Good job he didn’t claim it was then ay.

    Edukator
    Member

    Read all of Squirrelkings posts please, Drac. Especially the one on page two. The capital letters of ALWAYS clearly indicate sarcasm/irony and that he really does think that it’s the way people educate their children that’s the problem not the inability of the owner to train and control the dog. With no need to use capitals I’ll state without a hint of irony, sarcasm, outrage, injustice or whatever:

    It’s always the dog owner’s fault when a dog bites a child in a public place.

    Edit: Drac, every one of your posts on this page has been to have a pop at me. If you read through the thread my contributions are far from the most extreme or the most provocative.

    Premier Icon Cougar
    Subscriber

    That sounds painful.

    Premier Icon Drac
    Subscriber

    It’s always the dog owner’s fault when a dog bites a child in a public place.

    If you say so.

    Drac, every one of your posts on this page has been to have a pop at me. If you read through the thread my contributions are far from the most extreme or the most provocative.

    They’re usual responses of you trying to provoke an argument of where only you are right and everyone should listen. Maybe my responses are only to you to try and point out to people what you’re doing.

    Premier Icon Cougar
    Subscriber

    I’m not sure as “always” is correct.

    Kid attacks dog with a stick, dog bites kid, dog’s fault?

    Premier Icon Drac
    Subscriber

    Kid attacks dog with a stick, dog bites kid, dog’s fault?

    squirrelking
    Member

    “Edukator”

    You know what, I have better things to be doing with my evening like making water. Have fun psychoanalysing everything I say and drawing your own fantastic conclusions.

    FWIW – putting words in people mouths (as you have done with me) is extremely provacative and as such I’ll just be ignoring you (don’t feed the troll and all that) from here on.

    Edukator
    Member

    Kid attacks dog with a stick, dog bites kid, dog’s fault?

    Dog owner’s fault for not putting him/herself between the poor dog and the kid with a stick.

    I think you can reasonably expect an adult to be capable of keeping a trained dog out of reach of a kid armed with a stick. I don’t think you can reasonably expect a kid to be able to defend itself against a dog.

Viewing 18 posts - 121 through 138 (of 138 total)

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