Does foam trump procore these days?

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  • Does foam trump procore these days?
  • Premier Icon gaidong
    Subscriber

    I’m speccing a new set of DH wheels (DT FR560s on DT 350s, 32 DT Comp and brass nips each) and am ‘insert-curious’… I usually run Schwalbe MM&HD with the super gravity carcass but seeing as this wheelset will be uplift only I want max protection (note emphasis rather than low pressure capability). I remember reading about the wonders of Procore 3-4 years ago but then Huck Norris etc etc foam jobbies followed. Are they more or less the same thing, cost being put aside? One a long-termish investment versus a frequently replaced consumable? I’m leaning Procore unless…
    Cheers,
    Gaidong.

    Something like Cushcore does basically the same job, but less fiddly than Procore.

    Folks I know who have tried both have ditched Procore for Cushcore

    There’s a much cheaper one than cushcore, can’t recall the name of it, I think a few on here have tried it? rim something or other?

    Edit – rimpact, review here

    Review | The Rimpact tubeless tyre inserts are some of the best value rim protection you can get

    Premier Icon howsyourdad1
    Subscriber

    Procore is pretty much dead i think, as predicted by this very forum   it’s heavy, some of which you can offset with lighter tyres mind, but then yes lighter tyres and lower pressures is squirmy.  If you are heavy, less than accurate shall we say and a rim destroyer i still think it has a place.

    Cushcore is grand but a lot of money, you do however get green valves to tell everyone you have spent alot of money.

    I use rimpact inserts (budget cushcore)  on my DH bike and rate them.

    Premier Icon kayak23
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    Use discount code oioi10 for ten percent off courtesy of the Deakinator.

    A mate runs those on his ebike, he’s bloody rapid, and has so far cured his issues so far….

    Premier Icon stumpy120
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    I’ve used Procore, Huck Norris and Cushcore.

    Huck Norris is too thin to actually do any good and Procore was more trouble than it was worth and I still cracked 2 rims with it.

    Cushcore is expensive for what it is but it’s been good and hassle free (apart from fitting, which isn’t too bad if you follow the instructions).

    I’ve seen the rimpact and nukeproof ard systems my friends are running and cushcore is quite different. Cushcore is more like rubber than the foam of the other systems.

    Premier Icon gaidong
    Subscriber

    « If you are heavy, less than accurate shall we say and a rim destroyer i still think it has a place »
    SOLD!! Thanks all think I have the general idea.

    Premier Icon hatter
    Subscriber

    Talking to a few of the mechanics at the Fort William WC, general consensus seems to be that the only ones that actually do anything are the fiddly to install, expensive ones (Chiefly Flat Tyre Defender and Cushcore) with everything else being various shades of useless in testing.

    ProCore worked very well but as well as being even fiddlier the high pressures placed huge pressure on MTB rims not designed for 80PSI and led to disproportionate levels of wheel failure for the teams running it.

    Have just gone for a double down rear tyre myself instead.

    tdog
    Member

    Trump is very much pro core foaming at the mouth these dats.

    Perhaps it’s a sign of lyme’s disease or something else wacky going on in that nutshell

    Premier Icon Northwind
    Subscriber

    I’ve been using foams for a while, it’s a bit up and down really. I’ve had a flat that wouldn’t seal because the tiny cut was right against the foam, so no sealant got to it… But then, I burped my front tyre in my race run at the Mega doing an iffy overtake, and was able to ride on for the last 5 minutes or so with probably about 5psi and the rimpact, it was a bit hairy but so much better than just having a flat. (the foam was pretty much destroyed in the process) I did manage to ding the rear rim despite DH carcass Minion and a rimpact, no idea when that happened.

    So I reckon it’s a lot about the riding and the consequences. Day to day, I’ve decided to stop using them, for racing I still would. I reckon it’ll be a better fit for more people than procore, even if only for price and lightness.

    Premier Icon gaidong
    Subscriber

    Still listening, thanks for all the input!

    Grum p
    Member

    I’ve used procore on the rear wheel for 4 seasons now (matched with dual ply casing tyres most of the time, double down or supergravity if I want to save some weight), and it does a grand job of limiting how many rims I go through. I live and bike guide in Chamonix and get about 300,000m of descending in a season so that’s a fair test. I run the procore at about 55psi (though even there you can feel the drop in spoke tension, so I have the wheel a little tighter than usual to compensate) to avoid the exploding wheel issue that a few folks had when the system first came out.
    It is hassle though. Changing tyres is a struggle, but it’s about the same level of struggle as Cushcore. After a while the tubeless sealant builds up on the inner tyre, which then helps it weld against the inner of the actual tyre. I’ve had to cut one procore tyre off in the past as it simply wouldn’t pull apart!
    If you flat on the trail and need to put a tube in then it’s not a quick change, but then I’ve not had to do that with a procore in as if I’ve ripped an unrepairable hole in the tyre I just keep going on the inner until I get to home/car. I’ve snapped the valve off a couple times, but the outer tyre remained sealed so again, just rode the rest of the day with a dropped amount of pressure in the tyre as 1/3 the volume had gone. Cushcore would win there.
    Despite all the above, I’ve gone from the rear rim being a disposable item to them easily lasting a full summer, current EX471 is almost 2 seasons old! So that’s a win for protection. Oddly though, the best thing I find about it is the combination of “progressive” travel through the tyre (you really do feel the change as the impact goes from outer to inner tyre pressures) and that you just can’t burp the tyre!
    See if you can find a secondhand procore if you’re not sure, I’ve heard of some right good deals from folks who couldn’t be having with the hassle…

    Premier Icon panzerjager
    Subscriber

    Similar to Grum p, I’ve used Procore in my rear wheel only for about 3 yrs now & haven’t had a puncture or rim failure in that time.
    I don’t even think it was that difficult to fit, just followed the Schwalbe video on youtube & it was as simple as they made it look.
    Used it with Conti Trail Kings, Schwalbe Magic Mary & currently with a Maxxis DHR II & all have been easy to fit.
    Running them on Roval Fatty SL Carbon rims, which are only rated to around 50psi, so that’s what I run the Procore at & its worked a treat. Unless you’re smashing downhill runs with little thought for your line choice then I’ve found that 80psi really isn’t necessary.
    Also, rear wheel only means I also effectively get 2 sets.

    alpin
    Member

    Have just installed ARD after smashing a rim and destroying an Agressor DD… The tyre would have died, but maybe my room would have been saved with it installed.

    Off for two weeks off bike parks and big alone days in Monday.

    Will report back if I don’t forget.

    Been running pro-core for a while now, not had a puncture or trashed a rim since, so to me worth the cost by a long way.
    Additionally I’ve dropped down from full dual ply tyres to exo’s so the weight penalty isn’t an issue…

    It’s not too much additional faff tbh, but after a while the inner tubes seem to stop working properly and faffing with the valves doesn’t seem to help… so I use a new, painfully expensive one… so it’s not quite worked out as a one off cost for me, so arguments over if it’s less ‘disposable’ than a foam insert.

    I’m now running less pressure as well that’s nice.
    I was thinking about trying something else a while back but on the whole i am sticking with it.

    Is is better than foams? Can’t say, would be nice if one of the recent group reviews of inserts had included pro core.

    Premier Icon jamesoz
    Subscriber

    Been running pro-core for a while now, not had a puncture or trashed a rim since, so to me worth the cost by a long way.
    Additionally I’ve dropped down from full dual ply tyres to exo’s so the weight penalty isn’t an issue…

    It’s not too much additional faff tbh, but after a while the inner tubes seem to stop working properly and faffing with the valves doesn’t seem to help… so I use a new, painfully expensive one… so it’s not quite worked out as a one off cost for me, so arguments over if it’s less ‘disposable’ than a foam insert.

    The valves can be cleaned out, tricky I know.
    I’ve moved to a non latex sealant (oko) and the valves don’t block anymore.

    Premier Icon nach
    Subscriber

    Can’t say, would be nice if one of the recent group reviews of inserts had included pro core.

    It will, though not a new review. I’ve got a couple more reviews to finish off before writing a quick wrap up talking about my experiences with them all. Overall, I lean more toward the tougher, more expensive foams than Procore now, but it has been bulletproof in the years I’ve run it.

    philjunior
    Member

    I don’t have to run dual ply with procore – it makes far more sense as in some cases I can get away with really quite under-engineered (fast rolling) tyres at nice low pressures for normal stuff, and lower pressures on normal tyres where I might have used dual ply in the past.

    I’d be interested if the foam inserts did perform better as my procore has become a bit of a stans ubermonster, and I do have to periodically change the tubes. Also one of the few punctures I’ve had with it there was a small leak on the procore (possibly the valve) so it couldn’t get me home no bother as it has other times (with slightly iffy handling)

    philjunior
    Member

    Oh and I don’t worry too much about maximum rim pressures as the size of the procore means you can run much higher pressure with the same load on the bead. (rim says 43psi, I run the full 85 cos why not).

    I’m sure this could be a factor for the big boys but TBH these days I’m fairly gentle and unlikely to get that close to destroying a rim (only a couple of minor dings when I’ve not been running procore over the past few years).

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