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  • Does beetroot juice do any more than just make your wee pink?
  • Premier Icon gothandy
    Full Member

    Has anyone done any research on the benefits of Beetroot juice?

    I’ve heard it is great for endurance but hard to separate marketing from science on the interwebs.

    Any ideas on quantity, and timing to have the best effect? i.e. drink it little and often, or just save the effect (if any) before a big event.

    Anyone actually noticed any improvements in endurance having drunk the stuff?

    Turning your wee pink was a slightly shocking side effect 🙂

    Premier Icon wwaswas
    Full Member

    wasn’t mtbmatt on the beetroot juice/ragley test team or something?

    I think he rides about a million miles a year so there must be somethign in it.

    Premier Icon elaine anne
    Free Member

    lol beetroot juice….. endurance …i think i need to try it lol..
    i guess you,ll have pink tongue n teeth too !!! lol 😉

    Premier Icon ahwiles
    Free Member

    cutted and pasted from the bbc website:

    A University of Exeter team found nitrate contained in the vegetable leads to a reduction in oxygen uptake – making exercise less tiring.

    The small Journal of Applied Physiology study suggests the effect is greater than that which can be achieved by regular training.

    Beetroot juice has previously been shown to reduce blood pressure.

    The researchers believe their findings could help people with cardiovascular, respiratory or metabolic diseases – and endurance athletes.

    They focused on eight men aged 19-38, who were given 500ml per day of organic beetroot juice for six consecutive days before completing a series of tests, involving cycling on an exercise bike.

    On another occasion, they were given a placebo of blackcurrant cordial for six consecutive days before completing the same cycling tests.

    After drinking beetroot juice the group was able to cycle for an average of 11.25 minutes – 92 seconds longer than when they were given the placebo.

    This would translate into an approximate 2% reduction in the time taken to cover a set distance.

    The group that had consumed the beetroot juice also had lower resting blood pressure.

    Mechanism unclear

    The researchers are not yet sure of the exact mechanism that causes the nitrate in the beetroot juice to boost stamina.

    However, they suspect it could be a result of the nitrate turning into nitric oxide in the body, reducing how much oxygen is burned up by exercise.

    Study researcher Professor Andy Jones – an adviser to top UK athlete Paula Radcliffe – said: “We were amazed by the effects of beetroot juice on oxygen uptake because these effects cannot be achieved by any other known means, including training.

    “I am sure professional and amateur athletes will be interested in the results of this research.

    “I am also keen to explore the relevance of the findings to those people who suffer from poor fitness and may be able to use dietary supplements to help them go about their daily lives.”

    Professor John Brewer, an expert on sports science at the University of Bedfordshire, said: “These findings are potentially exciting for many people involved in sport and exercise, but will almost certainly require further more extensive studies before the exact benefits and mechanisms are understood.

    “We must also remember that exercise and training and a sensible diet will always remain as the essential ingredients for a balanced and healthy lifestyle.”

    Dr Simon Marshall, of the University of San Diego, has carried out work on exercise and health.

    He said much more work was needed involving many more subjects to draw firm conclusions.

    “Certainly, a diet high in nitrate-rich fruits and vegetables is good for your heart health and this study provides further evidence of this.”

    Premier Icon poppa
    Free Member

    I find eating beetroot makes more of a difference to no 2. than to no 1. HTH. 😀

    Premier Icon theotherjonv
    Full Member

    On another occasion, they were given a placebo of blackcurrant cordial for six consecutive days before completing the same cycling tests.

    Some placebo! I thought the point of a placebo is that it is indistinguishable from the test substance.

    Blackcurrant cordial – yummy
    Anything that’s been near a beetroot, let alone made from it – grim

    Premier Icon rootes1
    Full Member

    tastes vile

    Premier Icon shedfull
    Free Member

    It’s a placebo as long as you don’t tell the test group which of the two substances is the one you suspect is giving a performance advantage.

    Premier Icon wwaswas
    Full Member

    and lets face it I’d imagine most people wouldn’t associate beetroot juice with anythign other than a woody aftertaste and purple poo the following day…

    Premier Icon theotherjonv
    Full Member

    It’s a placebo as long as you don’t tell the test group which of the two substances is the one you suspect is giving a performance advantage

    On the basis that if it’s any good for you it always tastes shite; conversely if it tastes nice it’s bad for you, I suspect that idea wasn’t overly effective in this case.

    You’d have to have concocted something equally awful. Liquidised mud and bark in pond water?

    Premier Icon toys19
    Free Member

    All we need is another study that finds blackcurrant juice is good for exercise too and they’ll be ****.

    Premier Icon ahwiles
    Free Member

    er, i like beetroot – especially pickled – yum!

    maybe the test should be repeated with people who like beetroot, but not blackcurrant…

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