Do you just have an off day when riding?

Viewing 15 posts - 41 through 55 (of 55 total)
  • Do you just have an off day when riding?
  • Premier Icon thisisnotaspoon
    Subscriber

    There’s also a sufferfest 10 week plan if you have a turbo trainer setup.

    The more I try (and fail to stick to) training plans the more I’m convinced that actually “just going for a ride” is actually of more benefit to the average MTBer. With the caveat’s that you have to both push yourself quite hard sometimes and have enough rest days.

    If you’re the type to only go for one ride a week then of course any training plan that makes you ride three or four times a week for 10 weeks will improve your fitness massively.

    But on the other hand if you can get into a routine with a couple of evening group rides and a longer one at the weekend then as long as those rides are hard enough to stimulate a response from your body you’ll get fitter.

    Training plans also ignore the fact that most people ride bikes for fun, yes after 10 weeks of getting fitter it will probably be more fun, but is that worth 10 weeks of it not being fun? My problem with training plans is as soon as the sun comes out I sack it off to just go out and ride some trails rather than doing the chores on the turbo trainer (literally, there’s a sufferfest workout called the chores that crops up a lot on the MTB plan).

    grannyjone
    Member

    Yes I have lots of off-days.
    They come in phases so I’ll often go through several rides in a row of these.
    Sometimes it feels like my power output is lower so I’m not as fast on the flat and on the uphill sections.

    Sometimes my technical level goes down for a while, so I end up being slower on the DH’s, less likely to give the harder stuff a go, find it harder to pull a wheelie, dab far more often on technical climbs and crash more.

    I have no explanation on it whatsoever. It feels like my skill and fitness level does not just simply go up and up all the time despite regular riding.

    Premier Icon slowoldman
    Subscriber

    Yes certainly. Off days are easier to cope with on a road bike – just pretend you are on a recovery ride.

    mjsmke
    Member

    Yes. Sometimes go out with the intention of doing a long ride or pushing hard on hills and it just doesn’t happen. Other days I think i’m tired then once out feel fine.

    Every time I try jumping

    philjunior
    Member

    The more I try (and fail to stick to) training plans the more I’m convinced that actually “just going for a ride” is actually of more benefit to the average MTBer. With the caveat’s that you have to both push yourself quite hard sometimes and have enough rest days

    I’d agree that, as long as you do whatever you want to get better at (i.e. bimbling will only make you good at bimbling, pedalling on a turbo will only make you good at pedalling).

    I make up a decent amount of time on descents when I race XC, it’s much more fun than having a training plan.

    Premier Icon toblerone1
    Subscriber

    +1 for when my mental health is s**t and consequently I’ve not slept enough.

    Some days I have no energy but thankfully I can recognise and ride accordingly (slower!) now, although this wasn’t always the case..

    Stevet1
    Member

    I have a rule, well not a rule, but a general understanding between me and myself.
    I get pressure and stress at work
    I get pressure and stress at home
    when I’m out on my bike – no pressure.
    Do whatever I want, feel like riding hard today – great, feel like taking it easy – great. No beating yourself up about bike time, no ‘measuring yourself’ against others, no strava, nothing. Just fun, even if one week ‘fun’ is going faster than last week, that doesn’t mean that next week you have to go faster again.

    philjunior
    Member

    I have a rule, well not a rule, but a general understanding between me and myself.
    I get pressure and stress at work
    I get pressure and stress at home
    when I’m out on my bike – no pressure.
    Do whatever I want, feel like riding hard today – great, feel like taking it easy – great. No beating yourself up about bike time, no ‘measuring yourself’ against others, no strava, nothing. Just fun, even if one week ‘fun’ is going faster than last week, that doesn’t mean that next week you have to go faster again.

    Totally. I run Stava as a glorified odometer, but not always trying to “achieve” anything on it.
    I often find myself going for a chilled out ride, deciding to be really sensible on descents, then just getting carried away. It’s far better fun getting carried away than trying to force it! And if you go slow that’s fine too.

    Premier Icon senor j
    Subscriber

    I had one on Tuesday.
    Riding UP! the steep,eastern side of Leith Hill.
    Picked a “smooth” line around a tree and promptly hit a protruding stump withmy face/right eye. Plenty of claret and I now look like an unsuccessful MMA fighter.
    Soft lad.

    Premier Icon ransos
    Subscriber

    Happens to the best of them.

    Un Jour Sans

    Premier Icon DezB
    Subscriber

    My shorts just had a off day…! Left tessie was getting squashed all the way home. Made uphills definitely more difficult 🤪

    oldnick
    Member

    Oh God yeah! With any luck I spot it early and then that day becomes focused on just one aspect of the ride, be that corners, body position, daft pops off roots. That way I distract myself from how rubbish I am…
    I love the idea of un jour sans 🙂

    Premier Icon granny_ring
    Subscriber

    I’m still waiting for an’on’day 😂

Viewing 15 posts - 41 through 55 (of 55 total)

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