Do moies have a body clock?

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  • Do moies have a body clock?
  • andrewh
    Member

    If so, how does it work?

    Premier Icon bikebouy
    Subscriber

    Que?

    Wotz a moie??

    🤷‍♂️

    andrewh
    Member

    It’s a combination of a spilling mistake and not wearing my glasses

    Premier Icon w00dster
    Subscriber

    What’s a spilling mistake?

    A combination of you in the pub and typing on a phone? Still not sure what the original question is…..

    Premier Icon maccruiskeen
    Subscriber

    Still not sure what the original question is…..

    Somewhere a sleeper cell has awoken

    Premier Icon jimdubleyou
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    Somewhere a sleeper cell has awoken

    Yes, they do.

    Premier Icon beanum
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    I think the OP is referring to normal moles and the day/light cycle. I’m going to ignore all that and post this:

    Naked mole rats defy the biological law of aging

    https://www.sciencemag.org/news/2018/01/naked-mole-rats-defy-biological-law-aging

    cdoc
    Member

    how does it work

    Well, we thought that Circadian rhythm was regulated by environmental cues (light signal via retina), but loads of studies into blind or subterranean mammals revealed the complexity of the circadian gene layout, where the system has become enzyme expression based. This is interesting because it largely does away with the multiphasic aspect of regulation as unnecessary due to their lack of environmental and seasonal variation.

    Premier Icon kayak23
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    Don’t know what moies are. Flavor flave had a body clock.

    Yeah boi

    Premier Icon maccruiskeen
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    normal moles

    the enemy within

    Premier Icon akira
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    Some moies doies and some moies doiesnt.

    Premier Icon nedrapier
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    Thoidy doidy boids, sitting on a koib,

    Choipin’ and boipin’ and eatin’ doity oitwoims

    Along comes Hoiby from Thoidy Thoid and Thoid.

    Sees the thoidy doidy boids, sitting on the koib,

    Choipin’ and boipin’ and eatin’ doity oitwoims

    Boy, was he distoibed.

    johndoh
    Member

    I don’t think he does – he was late for the Radio One Breakfast Show quite a few times IIRC.

    Premier Icon bikebouy
    Subscriber

    Thoidy doidy boids, sitting on a koib,

    Choipin’ and boipin’ and eatin’ doity oitwoims

    Along comes Hoiby from Thoidy Thoid and Thoid.

    Sees the thoidy doidy boids, sitting on the koib,

    Choipin’ and boipin’ and eatin’ doity oitwoims

    Boy, was he distoibed.

    👏

    Premier Icon StirlingCrispin
    Subscriber

    cdoc – I understood that the system is enzyme expression based in all animals, but reset by environmental cues.

    <section id=”Abs1″ class=”Abstract” lang=”en” tabindex=”-1″>
    <p class=”Para”>”light is likely to maintain a role in the regulation of activity patterns also in this fossorial species”</p>

    </section>https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/BF02904384

    Note: my knowledge on this is not current and was specific to chickens.

    Premier Icon neil the wheel
    Subscriber

    This is why I love this forum! 😀

    cdoc
    Member

    Sorry, should have said ‘purely* enzyme based’ .

    I’m not aware of any Talpa europaea specific studies, but there have been a good few studies into other fossorial species examining the expression sites, protein substitutions and expressions against similar, non burrowing species and I recall that the general idea was that there is a greater reliance,and sole utilisation of a modified oscillatory pattern of MOP3 without the need for direct photon or thermal receptor cues to act as the reset switch.

    ’tis an interesting question, tbh. They will, but I would guess there would be some operational differences from other mammal, but not to the extent of some other truly underground species that may have atrophied the original receptor organs (eyes)

    Premier Icon sirromj
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    This is why I love this forum! 😀

    You can see much more of that just by pressing CTRL-U – on any website! 😉

    andrewh
    Member

    This is why I love this forum!

    Me too. Usual mix of chuckles and eductaed sensible answers, mixed in with random bits of unnecessary html.

    So, if I’ve understood correctly they probably do but that it is probably not regualated by light levels, it’s more internal/chemical. Which makes me think of my next question, if it isn’t controlled by outside stimuli such as daylight do they all synchronise, do all moles sleep at about the same time like most humans/cows/bats/etc do or are they out of sync and they all active/sleeping at differeent times?

    cdoc
    Member

    Consider it from the pov of a mole. Maybe they tend towards being nocturnal as this is their optimal foraging time (as earthworms rise to the surface to feed) and sleep when they recede again. Or they are least active during times of increased disturbance probability. I would guess that they were all pretty similar, behaviourally.

    andrewh
    Member

    Makes sense, most moiehills seem to appear overnight indicating that they are indeed more active at night. Didn’t know that about worms though, guess that’s why hedgehogs are nocturnal, although they eat a lot of slugs too and they are mostly about at night. Wonder what a slug tatses like? Do hedgehogs genuinely enjoy them?

    fasthaggis
    Member

    When I see moie hills right next the roadside verge,I always think how much of a fright the wee moie must get when it emerges next to some truck wheels.

    This was brought to you by moie commuter dreaming world.

    Premier Icon molgrips
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    Wonder what a slug tatses like?

    Try one.  Fried with some garlic.  I’d expect it to taste like escargot except the skin is apparently much tougher, to compensate for not having a shell.

    Premier Icon thisisnotaspoon
    Subscriber

    Do sleeper cells have body clocks?

    Try one.  Fried with some garlic.  I’d expect it to taste like escargot except the skin is apparently much tougher, to compensate for not having a shell.

    https://www.straitstimes.com/asia/australianz/australian-man-dies-eight-years-after-eating-a-slug-on-a-dare

    Makes you wonder what the I’m a celeb’s risk assessment must look like!

    philjunior
    Member

    https://www.straitstimes.com/asia/australianz/australian-man-dies-eight-years-after-eating-a-slug-on-a-dare

    Makes you wonder what the I’m a celeb’s risk assessment must look like!

    Fine if you cook the slug, according to the article.

    Watch out for salad though!

Viewing 25 posts - 1 through 25 (of 25 total)

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