Do it all bike with 6-7" of travel

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  • Do it all bike with 6-7" of travel
  • xvoidee
    Member

    Hello SingleTrackWorld Community!

    I’m riding bicycles for 5 years so I’m not professional rider but have enough experience to ride for fun and sometimes compete with other riders.

    At this moment I have two bikes:

    1. First one is AM bike.
    * Frame: Giant Reign X 2009 (M), 171mm of travel
    * Fork: Lyrik UTurn (Coil), 160mm of travel
    * Rear shock: Fox DHX RC4 (Steel Coil), 400lbs and 450lbs
    * En521 rims, SLX, X9, Hayes Stroker Trail 203+180
    Total weight ~16.5kg.
    + I’m satisfied with performance. Bike feels good on flats, quite good on descends and ok on uphills
    ? almost satisfied with geometry. I feel that head tube is low.
    ! not satisfied with weight. It quite high for AM bike bot too low for training. I prefer to do physical exercises on heavier bike but ride on lighter (please read comments and notes to my second bike)

    2. Downhill bike.
    * frame: Norco A-Line 2008
    * fork: RS Boxxer R2C2
    * shock: DHX 3, ti spring, 300lbs
    * SLX, X0, 2.5 dual ply tyres, Code 203+203 brakes and other DH stuff
    Total weight 19.3kg, ready to race.
    + satisfied with weight for descents
    + STRONGLY satisfied with weight for training. After riding series of light XC for one hour each on this bike… I can do everything on AM bike even if it weights 16.5kg. Cannot imagine what can I do with 13kg.
    – I’m very sad but I do not need DH bike. I was very close to serious injuries half a year ago and do not want to do more jumps and drops. But I still enjoy light-dh, aggressive trail riding, super-d races. I can do all this things on AM bike.

    So I’m selling out A-Line. And selling ReignX. I still have Giant frame and most of components from Norco (X0 transmission, brakes). And I am looking for replacement (but on failure I will keep it and build it again with lighter components).

    Objectives are:
    * frame 6-7 inches of travel (may be 7.5)
    * ideally I need 2 setups: lighter and steeper for AM and heavier and slacker for DH
    * total weight of bike at most 16.5kg with coil fork and shock
    * total weight of bike at most 15.2kg with air shock and fork and intermediate tyres (2.35 single ply)
    * long wheel base
    * nice head tube angle for descents
    * nice seat tube angle which will not destroy pedalling

    Currently it is Intense Uzzi, last generation.
    Draft version of build is in my googledocs: https://docs.google.com/spreadsheet/ccc?key=0AjjAjw_yCKN5dG1yejhFYW9EYWxGNWdpTURiUjhRbFE&usp=drive_web#gid=0

    In a few words, I want to have 2 forks (180mm and 160mm), 2 shocks (coil spring and air spring) and 2 sets of tyres (2ply and 1ply). This will give me two completely different setups: 15kg and 16.2kg. First one good for AM cycling and ok for racing, heavier – for every-day cycling and training (yes, weight and rolling resistance). Also this frame provides for me 2 versions of rear wheel travel (4 with additional shock), and 3 different values for BottomBracketHeight + HeadTubeAngle + WheelBase.

    What do you think about it?
    Can somebody give me opinion about Uzzi?
    How it feels on descents, uphills, flats?
    How efficient is this bike?
    How this bike rides with short travel? (on air shock) With long travel?
    Service and reliability? I’m talking about bearings and grease ports.

    I completely understand that for races like EWS I need full-carbon bike built on high-end components and 29″ wheels. But may be lighter version of Uzzi will be enough for amateur racing?

    May be better to consider other frames?
    – Banshee Rune V2
    – Commencal???
    – Intense Slope Style 2
    – Santa Cruz Nomad
    – Lapierre Spicy
    – Specialized Enduro
    – Norco Range, 27.5″
    – Scott Genius LT 700, 27.5″
    – Transition Covert 29″
    – Transition TR250
    – other manufacturers?

    Thanks in advance!

    hambl90
    Member

    Titus el guapo

    Premier Icon jambalaya
    Subscriber

    At a loss as to why you are fixed on 29 for EWS ? Covert yes but 26 or possibly something in 27.5
    Nukeproof Mega are very good, seem to pedal well and descend brilliantly.

    wrecker
    Member

    If you can get one, SC has no limit on fork travel on the LTc. I ride mine at 160mm for everything. Will have a high BB at 180mm though, but I’ve seen it done; the guide in molini had it.

    wrecker
    Member

    Sorry, missed the 29 bit. Nuts.
    Hang on, half of those listed aren’t 29…..

    Premier Icon mikewsmith
    Subscriber

    wrecker – Member
    If you can get one, SC has no limit on fork travel on the LTc. I ride mine at 160mm for everything. Will have a high BB at 180mm though, but I’ve seen it done; the guide in molini had it

    Mine does feel great and the 140mm never feels like a hindrance.

    wobbliscott
    Member

    Covert 29 is great (i’ve got one) and will take a 150mm up front no probs, but not even sure you can get 160mm 29er forks? I’m sure the frame would be robust enough to take them. I would suggest if you’re hell bent on over 150mm travel you look at 650B or 26 inch (the Covert comes in all three wheel sizes in the 2014 range). You’re far better off with something that is designed for what you want rather than pushing the boundaries of something else.

    The other bikes in your shortlist are all fantastic bikes and would fit the bill except the Transition TR250, which is a full on downhill rig so not exactly a do it all bike.

    Premier Icon mikewsmith
    Subscriber

    As for ews see jarred graves on the 26 yeti sb 66 and looking at how he did on it in the world’s dh it’s one for you to consider…

    Tom_W1987
    Member

    A new linkage arrangement and fresh tune lets the piggyback shock settle into its travel much easier. The 760mm bar means steering leverage is vast, and you can slam the seat right down to the clamp. The net result is a front wheel way out front on the trail and a serious ‘sat in the bike’ confidence that just shouts ‘Bring it!”

    The new tubeset is seriously stiff, from the head tube all the way through to the massive rear dropouts, so you can push the tyres to the limit with totally clear feedback. The gluey-compound front tyre and harder rear mean the Mega naturally hangs on at the front but slides at the rear if you push it into a slide.

    The extended wheelbase means massive stability whether you’re letting it fly off the brakes or drifting it through loose or wet corners at silly speeds. It feels slightly tall at first, but we soon got used to just pushing it into corners harder and didn’t worry after the first few corners.

    The supple rear shock and leant-back seat tube keep the front end easily liftable for drops and hops, despite the long rear end. Given how much if feels like a full-blown downhill bike in terms of unshakeably surefooted traction, it’s still agile enough to flick, flare and fly off any lip, hip or lump on the trail.

    http://www.bikeradar.com/mtb/gear/category/bikes/mountain-bikes/full-suspension/product/review-nukeproof-mega-am-comp-13-47613/

    Why would you need two setups with a sorted 160mm bike?

    I ran a coil SX trail setup with 170mm out back and a 180mm Totem up front….it was nowhere near as capable as my 2011 Mega and that has 152mm travel rear and 160mm front.

    (Although I take issue with the reviewers opinion that a supple shock helps lift the front end)

    dirtbiker100
    Member

    Last Herb 160
    If you’re desperate get rockers for 180 rear travel. can fit coil or air.

    But the suspension is so planted you’ll be fine on 160mm for everything. slack like a DH bike.

    You don’t need 29″ for enduro. Jerome and Jared were both on 26″

    You don’t need two types of tyres – Run some Hans Dampf’s tubeless and they’ll do you grand.

    something like this would do you fine: http://www.pinkbike.com/photo/10050017/

    Premier Icon JoeG
    Subscriber

    Tl; dr. 😐

    Get a fatbike! :mrgreen:

    obelix
    Member

    Pyga OneTen29

    Less travel than you specified, but apparently it feels more plush than the stats would indicate.

    JCL
    Member

    You need two bikes. Why compromise?

    If you really only want one I’d get a BMC TF01 or Enduro 29″.

    Premier Icon kayak23
    Subscriber

    Keep the reign x.
    Get different build kits like wheels.

    andyrm
    Member

    Any of the bikes you see in the EWS will be fine. I’ll also throw the Bionicon Alva 180 into the mix, it’s what I’ve been racing this season including 2 Superenduro rounds and the EWS final. My email is on my profil page if you want to message me for full spec and sort out a demo.

    🙂

    Premier Icon blur lt rider
    Subscriber

    Not 29 but have you thought about the Knolly Chilcotin?

    limkilde
    Member

    Go Commencal
    Either a Meta SX or Meta AM

    http://www.commencal-store.co.uk/

    Premier Icon boltonjon
    Subscriber

    Liteville 301 for either 140mm or 160mm travel

    Liteville 601 for 160 to 190mm travel

    Both awesome

    xvoidee
    Member

    Thanks for replies! I have almost 3 months before “deadline”, so may be I will keep ReignX and equip it with X0 and other top-level components. But currently I will continue to search for good frames. I’m not sure about Uzzi, because of 190mm travel – I can handle it but its too much for me…

    What do you think about Nukeproof Mega AM 275? Enough travel (160mm) and 27.5″ wheels.

    nosedive
    Member

    i like your idea. i have a 26 spesh enduro. i run 2 different sets of wheels. flow with downhill tyres. arch with a lighter tyre. currently using a 180 fox van. its fine on most descents and uplift days. i would love to have a fox 34 float to drop in and really lighten the bike for more natural stuff.

    never tried any of the other bikes you mention but my point is i think your idea can work.

    Premier Icon tmb467
    Subscriber

    I’m doing something similar with a scott voltage – adjustable for 150/170 rear

    160mm van rc2, vivid coil for uplift etc

    Monarch plus and new pikes for trail (to be sorted next year)

    Hope/flows should cover general riding duties for everything

    (Alternatively I’ll stick a vivid air on the back instead of having two different shocks)

    dekadanse
    Member

    Scott Genius LT I’d say, though Yeti SB66, Lapierre Spicy and Commencal also good if you want to stick at 160mm. Probably also Specialized Enduro higher spec. And Liteville or Santa Nomad if you’ve got cash to burn.

    messiah
    Member

    I used to run my Nicolai Helius AM with different set ups; coil shocks for more DH places and Air with shorter travel for XC. I eventually got frustrated with this as I liked aspects of both but neither was perfect; so I got a tuned air shock and coil fork which offer me what I think is the best all round set up I can have… I’d rather have less better suspension travel than more rubbish travel that compromises the bike. As for the weight thing you could run heavy wheels and tyres for training… but I ride for fun and find the lighter bike is more fun.

    If I was looking for what you are, and I kind of am, I’d be looking at a Nicolai Ion (15 or 16) I.e. In any wheel size which takes your fancy. A bike for fun according to Pinkbike when they reviewed it recently.

    Premier Icon tmb467
    Subscriber

    Hmmm – maybe a vivid air is what I need then

    Coil fork and tuned air instead of multiple configurations.

    Cheers

    Edit : cheaper than a monarch as well!

    Tom_W1987
    Member

    What do you think about Nukeproof Mega AM 275? Enough travel (160mm) and 27.5″ wheels.

    Considering the 26 inch Mega’s getting scorching reviews, I’d doubt many 180mm bikes are more capable.

    Another

    2013 Nukeproof Mega AM review

    Coil fork and tuned air instead of multiple configurations.

    My experience of coil forks front and an airshock rear is that it makes the bike front heavy when jumping.

    Premier Icon tmb467
    Subscriber

    To be fair – I’m not too fussed on jumping

    400g off the front of the centre of gravity isn’t really going to alter things too much either

    Cube stereo, I love mine

    messiah
    Member

    Coil fork and tuned air instead of multiple configurations.

    Sorry if I confused you with my post above. It’s more that both my fork and shock are tuned for how I want them than that the front is coil and the rear is air.

    Tom_W1987
    Member

    To be fair – I’m not too fussed on jumping

    400g off the front of the centre of gravity isn’t really going to alter things too much either

    From Pikes/Slants to Lyriks/Fox 36’s it’s more 700 grams – and yes it makes a huge difference jumping.

    And the Pikes are plusher than my coil Lyriks.

    Premier Icon tmb467
    Subscriber

    Sorry if I confused you with my post above. It’s more that both my fork and shock are tuned for how I want them than that the front is coil and the rear is air

    No – I knew what you meant from the first post about less better suspension

    My dilemma was in whether to try and run air/air for trail and coil /coil for rougher stuff. If I wanted to really lighten the bike then I could go down that route, but it’s not going to be cheap. I’d been reading about your adventures with avalanche earlier this year, so know what you were getting at

    Still not sure on what you’re saying Tom_W…but I think you were comparing coil front / air rear with air front and not what i was saying about coil rear. Both coil and air forks will do for jumping and yes, a coil is significantly heavier but an air fork will lose its damping on a long downhill trail, hence why I prefer a coil. And really, if you’ve bought a pike just to jump with then you’ve got more money than me

    Premier Icon mikewsmith
    Subscriber

    heavier but an air fork will lose its damping on a long downhill trail, hence why I prefer a coil. And really, if you’ve bought a pike just to jump with then you’ve got more money than me

    26km of mega avalanche and it was still fine 🙂

    Air forks will stand up to the abuse these days the Fox 40 Floats for instance

    Premier Icon tmb467
    Subscriber

    Tbf – if I had the money for the Pikes or something of the quality with 160/170 mm travel I’d be on em

    My budget sort of constrains me to older stuff which normally means heavier

    I used to run my Nicolai Helius AM with different set ups; coil shocks for more DH places and Air with shorter travel for XC.

    Nicolai now recommending Air CCDB > Coil = best of both worlds?

    Premier Icon HansRey
    Subscriber

    marin quake. make sure to get the maxle dropouts.
    good for 150 – 190mm front travel. Have seen 210mm-ish forks on them.

    climb like a goat and built like a tank

    julians
    Member

    I have a ccdb air shock on the rear paired with a marzocchi 55 rc3 ti coil fork on the front on my ibis mojo HD.

    They’re pretty well matched together in terms of performance and the bike itself works well enough on everything I need it to do (alps/southern spain/trail centres/peak district), it weighs just over 14kg in this guise, with 2.35 single ply tyres.

    The frame will take an angleset if you want it slacker/steeper, and it pedals pretty well. Its also designed for 160mm – 180mm forks (mine are 170mm)

    Milkie
    Member

    Objectives are:
    * frame 6-7 inches of travel (may be 7.5) – Genius LT 7.3″
    * ideally I need 2 setups: lighter and steeper for AM and heavier and slacker for DH Genius LT 140mm or 180mm modes
    * total weight of bike at most 16.5kg with coil fork and shock
    * total weight of bike at most 15.2kg with air shock and fork and intermediate tyres (2.35 single ply) – Genuis LT 14kg
    * long wheel base
    * nice head tube angle for descents – Genius LT
    * nice seat tube angle which will not destroy pedalling

    It may be worth trying a Genius LT. I use one for everything from XC to proper DH runs (Pila, etc). Has 2 Step too, 140mm(front)/110mm(rear) and 180mm/185mm.

    Premier Icon youngrob
    Subscriber

    +1 for the Mega. I recently built one up with the X-Fusion Vengeance 170mm forks, running 1×10, the bike climbs well and descends better than I can. Really good fun bike.

    yippeekiyay
    Member

    The Mega AM 275 can take up to 180mm upfront. I recently got the 26″ version full build with a Lyrik 170mm. Great spec for the money. As youngRob says, climbs well and even better going down.

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