Viewing 40 posts - 1 through 40 (of 47 total)
  • DHF “Float zone”
  • Premier Icon rockandrollmark
    Full Member

    Recently switched from Maxxis Ardents in 2.4 flavour front and rear, to DHF up front in 2.5 and 2.4 Dissector rear. Absolutely love the Dissector. Loads more grip everywhere and it’s climbing ability is next leve (honestly I feel like I’m cheating it’s such a good tyre)l. I’m still not fully sold on the DHF though. I’ve had about three or four occasions where I’ve hit what I’ve since leant others call the Float Zone and I’m not sure if I like it. I’ve not washed out completely yet, but it’s certainly unnerving when you lean the bike and the front suddenly feels like it’s going to wash out.

    Is this something which I need to get used to, trusting that it WILL wash out, but that it WILL also grip (eventually), or is this something I need to learn to ride around (I.e. commit more).

    Or am I just doing it all wrong and I’ve bought the wrong tyre and I should’ve stuck an Assegai on there and just sucked up the higher rolling resistance and weight.

    Premier Icon Northwind
    Full Member

    A bit more or less pressure might change it enough to stop bothering you. Or, you might get used to it- it doesn’t actually cause washing out, it’s just a nasty moment of bad feedback that feels like it, rather than a real hole in traction. But that’s still important…

    Premier Icon jayx2a
    Free Member

    Interesting feedback. This was a combo I was considering also. But wasn’t sure how they would handle the winter.

    Would these widths work on 29mm internal rims?

    Premier Icon Onzadog
    Free Member

    Do you tend to lean body and bike together when cornering? Doing so might leave you in the transition zone for longer.

    Try weighting the outside pedal more and pushing the bike over more while leaving the body more upright. This more aggressive cornering technique puts you straight on the edging tread.

    Premier Icon steamtb
    Full Member

    As above for me, I’m a huge fan of the DHF and the more aggressive I’ve got as a rider in corners the more grip it’s given. I don’t really notice a dead zone now. Everyone rides in a different way though! 🙂

    Premier Icon sharkattack
    Free Member

    I gave up on DHF’s a few years ago. I’m baffled by the amount of people who use them.

    I’ve used them on multiple DH bikes in various exotic locations and I’ve never found the conditions where they work. I’ve never had anything other than a massive lack of sideways grip and treacherous under steer.

    They’ve always ended up as a rear tyre where I’ve drifted them to death guilt free.

    Premier Icon Yak
    Full Member

    As above, you need to be more aggressive and get it hard onto the edge blocks. Do some cornering practice on the flat and get a feel for how far to push the bike down and away from your body.

    Premier Icon mashr
    Free Member

    sharkattack
    Free Member

    I gave up on DHF’s a few years ago. I’m baffled by the amount of people who use them.

    I’ve used them on multiple DH bikes in various exotic locations and I’ve never found the conditions where they work. I’ve never had anything other than a massive lack of sideways grip and treacherous under steer.

    They’ve always ended up as a rear tyre where I’ve drifted them to death guilt free.

    Conversely I’ve used them pretty much exclusively since they came out, on multiple bikes (DH and otherwise) in various exotic locations and I’ve never found conditions where they don’t work (bar deep slop that needs a full mud tyre)

    Premier Icon sharkattack
    Free Member

    Yeah I know, loads of people love them. I’ve just always found that switching to a High Roller feels much less dangerous.

    Premier Icon rockandrollmark
    Full Member

    Will have a play around with pressures thanks.

    Onzadog

    Do you tend to lean body and bike together when cornering? Doing so might leave you in the transition zone for longer.

    When I’m pushing on I lean the bike more consciously. It’s more when I’m out of ATTACK!! mode and have full-bimble mode engaged that I’m getting caught out. Still a bit unnerving though.

    jayx2a

    Would these widths work on 29mm internal rims?

    Both tyres are rated “Wide Trail” by Maxxis, so for 30mm rims and up. If you read the marketing guff this puts the side knobs at the optimum angle for cornering. In my head a 29mm rim and a 30mm rim are pretty much the same thing.

    Premier Icon mashr
    Free Member

    sharkattack
    Free Member

    Yeah I know, loads of people love them. I’ve just always found that switching to a High Roller feels much less dangerous

    Very much different strokes for different folks – I hate High Rollers with a passsion, for very similar reasons to what you think about the DHF

    Premier Icon prezet
    Free Member

    The DHF is a great tyre. But it does suffer from the transition from the center to the outer blocks when cornering which is what you’re referring to.

    I rode DHF for a few years. Recently switched to an Assegai up front (DHR rear) and IMO it’s better all round.

    Premier Icon chainbreaker
    Free Member

    I used to find this with DHFs, but I’ve learnt to ride them more aggressively and lean the bike over more and they just grip now. Still one of the grippiest front tires I’ve ever used.

    As for Assegais, not sure what the hype is about. Tried one and hated it, cornering traction was poor and it clogged up in mud a bit more compared to the DHF.

    Premier Icon jimmy748
    Full Member

    I’ve never had an issue with the “float zone” on a DHF, but did with a DHR2 on the front. Now running a DH22 on the front and that more sticky than a sticky thing no matter then lean angle.

    Premier Icon sharkattack
    Free Member

    I think the original super tacky High Roller is one of, if not THE, greatest mtb product ever made.

    Premier Icon Northwind
    Full Member

    jimmy748
    Full Member

    I’ve never had an issue with the “float zone” on a DHF, but did with a DHR2 on the front.

    That’s funny, I was going to say to the OP that if he likes the tyre overall but can’t get past the float, try a DHR2 since it’s basically the same edge and a better middle 🙂 Funny how people’s experiences vary.

    chainbreaker
    Free Member

    As for Assegais, not sure what the hype is about. Tried one and hated it, cornering traction was poor and it clogged up in mud a bit more compared to the DHF.

    Assegai seems a bit specific tbh, my first rides were too slow and it was just constantly clogged. Then the next couple of rides were too hard for it to shine. Finally did a golfy day with the right amount of mud and it was really bloody awesome, and it’s nice that it’s at its best when you really need the tyre to be at its best… But I don’t get how people are finding it a great allrounder, it just doesn’t work that way for me?

    Premier Icon jimmy748
    Full Member

    Either a DHF or more likely a Assegai did alright yesterday with some old bloke on it.

    Premier Icon igm
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    Just finished 9 days riding in the alps (ok 2 of them in road bikes) and of those in my family on DHFs (4 ranging from 10 to 50) exactly nine of them were killed by their tyres.

    Rider error nearly got a couple of us.

    Premier Icon igm
    Full Member

    None not nine

    Though nine kind of works

    Premier Icon cb200
    Free Member

    Just finished 9 days riding in the alps (ok 2 of them in road bikes) and of those in my family on DHFs (4 ranging from 10 to 50) exactly nine of them were killed by their tyres.

    Sorry, I’m probably just tired, but I can’t make sense of this post.

    Premier Icon cb200
    Free Member

    Ah, gotcha on the crossfire. Ta 🙂

    Premier Icon eddd
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    I had a DHF 2.4, didn’t like it, never felt confident. Switched to Assegai 2.5 WT, happy!
    That’s on a 30mm rim

    Premier Icon mashr
    Free Member

    jimmy748
    Full Member

    Either a DHF or more likely a Assegai did alright yesterday with some old bloke on it.

    Gonna have to break it to you – he works his tyres a little harder than everyone on this thread…..and 99.999% of the world at large

    Premier Icon Scienceofficer
    Free Member

    But I don’t get how people are finding it a great allrounder, it just doesn’t work that way for me?

    Me neither. I found the hyperbole didn’t translate to reality. Much prefer the DHF, particularly its edge grip, and found the Assegai more clog prone in mixed conditions.

    I prefer the DHF to the DHR2 as well. DHR2 braked better and turned onto its edge more smoothly, (which the Assegai also did) but I found it harder to tell where the edges were and didn’t trust either as much as the DHF.

    YMMV of course, because it’s down to riding style and conditions you ride in.

    Premier Icon richmtb
    Full Member

    I’m another one who switched to a DHRII on the front. I basically admitted I’m not good enough to get the best out of the DHF and what I actually need is a tyre with more support in between the centre and edge tread.

    A mountain bike might only be as good as its front tyre, but a mountain bike rider is only as good as he thinks the front tyre is.

    I’m much happier on the DHRII, it possibly not a fair comparison as I only tried the DHF in 2.3″ and I’m using a DHRII in 2.4″ WT

    Premier Icon weeksy
    Full Member

    Interesting, i was at 417 the other day with a new DHF on the front from Merlin and couldn’t get any confidence at all. So i’ve gone back to the MTB Vigilante and put the DHF on the back instead.

    Interestingly though i stuck another DHF onto my lads Sworks and he’s most happy with it, but he does ride several levels above me, both in terms of performance and cornering… So maybe he’s pushing it harder. I will be taking a spare front to BPW just in case though on Thurs.

    Premier Icon Stigheed
    Full Member

    Just this week I have switched from a DHF on the front to a Magic Mary. I hadn’t realised how much grip I was missing out on with little additional rolling resistance. Previously I had no major issues with the DHF (No great love either) but now I would struggle to put it back on for year round use.

    Premier Icon joebristol
    Full Member

    I didn’t like the DHR2 on the front (2.3” exo 3c max Terra) – I found it gripped really well until the second it didn’t. No warning, just on my face on the ground.

    Swapped to a 2.5” DHF 3c exo max Terra and that’s my default 2-3 season front tyre on both bikes. When it’s a bit luckier I tend to drag out the 2.35 and 2.6” magic Mary’s (I have one of each). They still do trail centre but make a much better fist of naturally sloppy mud trails. The 2.6” one is much better at slop than the 2.35” version – both addix soft compound.

    I think with the dhf it’s best when you ride it quite aggressively and get it lent over as early in a corner as you can – although I don’t think I’ve really ever noticed the ‘float zone’ as such.

    Premier Icon thisisnotaspoon
    Full Member

    I think the original super tacky High Roller is one of, if not THE, greatest mtb product ever made.

    I was going to question why anyone would pick the HR over the DHF (except as a rear tyre). But they definitely made sense as a supertacky in the dry at least. It was almost like cheating.

    Still think the DHF works better as a slightly-hardcore trail tyre without having to suffer with the supertacky rolling resistance on climbs.

    Premier Icon nickc
    Full Member

    I’m another one who switched to a DHRII on the front. I basically admitted I’m not good enough to get the best out of the DHF

    haha, more honest than me, I’ve called the DHR a better all rounder, and left it there…but pretty much on the same page as you!

    Premier Icon mashr
    Free Member

    thisisnotaspoon
    Full Member
    I was going to question why anyone would pick the HR over the DHF (except as a rear tyre). But they definitely made sense as a supertacky in the dry at least. It was almost like cheating.

    pfft, if you wanted grip, and a tyre that would last a handful of runs, Slow Reezay is where it’s at.

    I thought HRs were great and used them until I stated DHFs, then didn’t feel the need anymore

    Premier Icon kiwijohn
    Full Member

    I tried Maxxis again last summer & wish I hadn’t. So many punctures.
    Dissectors were great for 5 minutes & were then worn out.
    Punctured a double down Aggressor on the second ride.
    Assegai DD Maxgrip was the best front tyre they make.
    Back on Wild Enduros this winter & They’re as good as last time. Even though the rear has a limited life, what good rear tyre does?
    Next up os a Wild DH 22 up front & 34 out back. Certainly not for XC types.

    Premier Icon Sui
    Free Member

    I’ve gtot a love hate realtionship with Maxxis. For me, they are very good for my style of riding (not exactly easy going), and therein they work – i’ll qualify this, that whn i’m in a CBA mood, i tend to crash more. However, i am constantly annoyed at how the tyres have a habit of warping/case tearing when you run the pressures a little lower – though i noticed it doesn;t happen anywere near as much with a tube in. This happens with HR, DHR’s, DHF’s but didn’t have it when i used an Ardent (which i might add are bloomin brilliant in the dry, but a little weedy)..

    I think Maxxis have always favoured a more aggressive riding technique, whereas a relaxed rider would be better on HansDamp, orButcher/Purg combo. Im reliable told the Vittoria’s have the characteristic grip that an aggressive rider gets from Maxxis, but the reliability from say a HD/butcher/Purg – and better longevity.. I can’t find out because some twonk decided that 26’s werent cool anymore.. (just for clarity i am actually on a modern bike, i just prefer 26″ wheels)..

    Premier Icon Northwind
    Full Member

    mashr
    Free Member

    pfft, if you wanted grip, and a tyre that would last a handful of runs, Slow Reezay is where it’s at.

    I once put a slow reazy on the front and a supertacky on the rear, for the fort william endurance dh- logic being that the previous year, by about hour 4 I’d got really sloppy and my hands were blown from too much braking, so tons of grip and drag seemed like a good idea. They were both pretty much slick by the end of 15 runs 🙂

    Premier Icon bikesandboots
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    I’m another one who switched to a DHRII on the front. I basically admitted I’m not good enough to get the best out of the DHF and what I actually need is a tyre with more support in between the centre and edge tread.

    Same, just not aggressive enough. First time on an LLS bike was also my first time with a DHF, the washout-induced crash was quite predictable in retrospect. DHRII will be going on the rear for winter, replacing a Dissector, and be replaced by a Der Baron Projekt.

    Premier Icon phil5556
    Full Member

    I basically admitted I’m not good enough to get the best out of the DHF and what I actually need is a tyre with more support in between the centre and edge tread.

    I’ve got a new wheel on the way and was all set to treat myself to a DHF, but reading this thread and particularly comments like this is putting me off.

    I too suspect I will fall in to the not aggressive enough category.

    I’ve got a WTB Vigilante which has been on the front since the bike was new, never tried anything else so don’t know what I’m missing out on.

    High Roller 2 on the back has been good and I don’t feel any need to change that (except they don’t last long).

    Should I just put another HR2 on the front?

    Premier Icon rockandrollmark
    Full Member

    ^ ^ If you don’t mind the extra weight, maybe look at an Assagai? Like a DHF but more supportive in the transition.

    FWIW I had a play around with pressures this weekend the DHF up front has gone from ‘mildly terrifying’ to ‘perfectly adequate’. I’m certainly not worshipping at the alter of DHF yet, but I can live with it for now and will continue to tweak my setup to see if I can achieve that moment of epiphany that others seem to find.

    Premier Icon enigmas
    Free Member

    I’ve a few mates who have all tried the DHF and not got on with it due to the so called float zone. Havent tried it myself.

    I like the DHR 2 on the front as a good all rounder, but I did find it can let go without warning when on the limit. Not when transitioning, when really lent over.

    Many friends like the assegei but only on certain conditions. Too dry and it can feel vague and too muddly and it’ll clog. Apparently the maxxgrip version is better but very slow.

    Personally for me nothing beats a magic Mary for 90% of the time, essentially unless it’s properly solid hardpack.

    Premier Icon Nobeerinthefridge
    Free Member

    Many friends like the assegei but only on certain conditions. Too dry and it can feel vague and too muddly and it’ll clog. Apparently the maxxgrip version is better but very slow.

    Personally for me nothing beats a magic Mary for 90% of the time, essentially unless it’s properly solid hardpack.

    I’ve went for an Assegai on the front, basically because I’ve used Mary’s for years now, and just felt like I should try something else for a change.

    Amazing front tyre.

    Premier Icon Onzadog
    Free Member

    I was looking at maxxis.co.uk the other day and it looks like the DHF is no longer on the site although listed on the .com version.

    Perhaps it’s being phased out.

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