Viewing 8 posts - 41 through 48 (of 48 total)
  • Current thinking on exercising after Covid.
  • Premier Icon Kryton57
    Full Member

    Useful thanks ^^

    I mentioned I felt better today – Body Battery shows 28 to 73 overnight, which is the first time its been over 50 this week. I think I’ll drop my lunchtime spin today and have an extend weekend of recovery based on the advice and experience above.

    Premier Icon rob13
    Free Member

    Thanks @ahsat, last night was my first night of restful sleep since it all went the other way. No waking with headache and a dry mouth and only waking once or twice. As @akbar has explained, the symptoms mirror stress and anxiety, something that I’m familiar with from several years back and something I recognise and counter when I think the water is rising. Unfortunately all of the usual techniques didn’t work to bring the sleep on track and as a result it all turned on its head. There probably is an element of stress in there as there are some big changes coming up but it definitely caught me out!

    I’ll take it easy for the next week and just see how my body responds to light exercise and hopefully the signs will be positive.

    Premier Icon ahsat
    Full Member

    I don’t disagree at all with the thoughts linking some of this to anxiety – I have a history of anxiety and I know it didn’t help. Some of that headache, not sleeping etc definitely seem to be related to the stress of the whole situation and for me lasted for about 8 weeks (eventually helped by being put on part time work by my occ health). I was then left with more classic post viral issue of fatigue, breathing issues (this seems relatively covid specific) and a persistent headache. Long covid is a catch all term, and for many is post viral fatigue, but for others (see the long covid thread) is a lot more complex.

    Speaking with various long covid Physio’s and reading scientific literature (I’m an academic so can’t help myself) there seems to be an over dominance of people with long covid after a mild infection, who are the alpha type personalities: a lot of get and go, (maybe a bit anxious), previously used to running a marathon and holding down an intense job. No doubt that not being used to stepping off the gas (I put myself in that group) doesn’t come easy.

    Good luck all. There is research that suggests the vaccines reduce risks of long covid by 50%. Take it easy and I am keeping my fingers crossed for you all that this is just a short term thing and you’ll be back out blasting around in no time. Listen to your body – don’t fight it.

    Premier Icon Kryton57
    Full Member

    …a lot of get and go, (maybe a bit anxious), previously used to running a marathon and holding down an intense job. No doubt that not being used to stepping off the gas (I put myself in that group) doesn’t come easy.

    A 50yo corporate Sales Director with high functioning anxiety and regional/national MTB racing & training? I’m doomed!!

    On a serious note that one sentence has brought to the front of my mind the “normal” daily stress I’m assuming, as various people have pointed out this needs more personal consideration post covid.

    Premier Icon rob13
    Free Member

    Certainly sounds that way. As it is, the anxiety around Covid wasn’t there for me. I wasn’t concerned about catching it and when I did I was just miserable that I had to stay inside for Christmas but I too have a fairly high pressure (at times) job and is shift based. Getting my sleep on track is important so that I can go back to shifts confident that the off days will get me rest for the days and nights on shift. I’ve put stress on myself to get back to work when colleagues have had it around me and have had no symptoms or very mild. I’m double jabbed but they are older and are tripled.

    Premier Icon akbar
    Free Member

    Certainly sounds that way. As it is, the anxiety around Covid wasn’t there for me. I wasn’t concerned about catching it and when I did I was just miserable that I had to stay inside for Christmas but I too have a fairly high pressure (at times) job and is shift based. Getting my sleep on track is important so that I can go back to shifts confident that the off days will get me rest for the days and nights on shift. I’ve put stress on myself to get back to work when colleagues have had it around me and have had no symptoms or very mild. I’m double jabbed but they are older and are tripled.

    Yes agreed, many people I know have struggled with their mental health over the last two years. Like you I wasn’t worried about Covid itself. More worried about the business I’d built up over the last 15 years going down the pan due to the ever changing Covid rules and the knock on effect on mortgage, house and kids, loyal staff etc, should it have failed. My wife has been distressed because she was not allowed to visit her dying mother in hospital in the last few weeks of her life and never got to say goodbye properly. For this she feels incredibly guilty and also seems to have developed a form of IBS which she’s having big trouble with.

    So for the first time in our lives we have both sought counselling this year to deal with the fall out. Must be many others in the same boat. Best thing for it though is being able to get out on the bike. Takes your mind off it for a while and with mental health being so closely linked to physical health, might just help aid your recovery from Covid and many other health issues.

    Premier Icon ahsat
    Full Member

    On a serious note that one sentence has brought to the front of my mind the “normal” daily stress I’m assuming, as various people have pointed out this needs more personal consideration post covid.

    I defiantly can relate to this. I wish I never had long covid, but it certainly has made me reflect on my daily/weekly balance, and trying to put less expectation on myself. I think this can only be healthy.

    Premier Icon rob13
    Free Member

    Without wanting to deviate from the Covid links, the thing to remember is everyone has a certain level of stress in their lives and everyone manages different loads in their own way. Some never seem phased by anything and really take a lot of it on, in both private and professional, and others pop at the most minor of deviations in the track. It’s noticing the small things that might set of a trigger which they wouldn’t usually. On reflection there’s probably an element of both in my post viral fatigue, so it’s hard to separate the two.

    Physical health is massive for my mental health and I’ve come to appreciate that over the last 10 years. It gives me focus, and without going overboard, being outside makes me feel better inside.

    To those who have contributed to this, thanks very much for spotlighting the danger of going too soon and for those who are in the thick of it, I hope you get better soon. I’ll listen to what my body tells me over the next couple of weeks and take it easy. I’m hoping to start the year in February now and look forward to getting back to full health ready for the spring.

Viewing 8 posts - 41 through 48 (of 48 total)

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