Viewing 40 posts - 1 through 40 (of 53 total)
  • Crushingly bored at work…
  • Premier Icon finbar
    Free Member

    I am finding my job intolerably boring. Like, want-to-jump-out-of-the-window boring. But also exceedingly stressful. The job pays well and – objectively – it’s actually pretty interesting stuff (government policy, I was in No. 10 last month, etc.). But I think for me it’s: (a) run its course, (b) my nerves are frazzled and (c) ultimately I’m just not cut out to spend 90% of my time at a computer. I’d love to do something hands-on. I’m 36 FWIW.

    If I can stick it out for another 24 months (in my head that sounds better than two years) my mortage will be paid, my pension will be in a great place and I could potentially afford to take a year or two to go back to college and learn how to be a kitchen fitter or something, and then earn much less thereafter.

    I’m not really sure where I’m going with this post. But is anyone else stuck doing something overwhelmingly dull but exceedingly stressful? Basically I think I’m looking for some morale support to tough it out…

    Premier Icon perchypanther
    Free Member

    it’s actually pretty interesting stuff (government policy, I was in No. 10 last month, etc.)

    About to get considerably more interesting, i’ll wager.

    Premier Icon IHN
    Full Member

    I’m 36 FWIW

    If I can stick it out for another 24 months… my mortage will be paid

    *insert surprised and somewhat jealous emoji here*

    Premier Icon finbar
    Free Member

    About to get considerably more interesting, i’ll wager.

    I think that’s part of the problem 😀 ! We’ve been in an odd sort of limbo since May (and, well, for the past 3 years in some ways). And uncertainty is the cousin of anxiety…

    *insert surprised and somewhat jealous emoji here*

    Yes, I know this is very a lucky position to be in. Albeit from unhappy circumstances – both my partner and I have already ‘had’ our inheritances from mothers who sadly aren’t with us any more (nothing else to come from fathers’ sides!). And we’ve no desire to work up to a McMansion which helps a lot 🙂 .

    Premier Icon jekkyl
    Full Member

    Having no mortgage is an excellent place to be!
    Stick it out and make your life about time away from work. Get wild as often as possible, go out riding straight after work.

    Premier Icon CaptainFlashheart
    Free Member

    DW?

    Premier Icon jimdubleyou
    Full Member

    Can you work 6 months a year and be 4 years away from paying off your mortgage?

    You might find it more sustainable than moving into something completely different.

    Premier Icon fossy
    Full Member

    Is plumbing still a good career to be in – can make a fair amount and choose your hours ?

    Premier Icon bikebouy
    Free Member

    Is this Farrages private secretary??

    Premier Icon philjunior
    Free Member

    Similar position here but not so much pay, and perhaps not quite so negative about my current job.

    I think if I felt as bad as that, I might just ditch it sooner rather than later.

    Premier Icon TheBrick
    Free Member

    Apart from the working in government and only 2 years of mortgage left you have just discibed my situation! ( Couple of years older).

    I can’t do two more years through.

    Premier Icon finbar
    Free Member

    DW?

    David Willets? I just missed him when I worked at BIS (not my initials)

    Stick it out and make your life about time away from work. Get wild as often as possible, go out riding straight after work.

    Thanks, this is probably the answer – easier said than done of course. Chaingang tonight though 8)

    Very flexible working like 6 months on/off isn’t really an option – a four-day week would be possible, but invariably round here that just means getting paid less to do the same amount of work.

    Plumbing (specifically designing/fitting bathrooms) does appeal although I think I’d rather work with wood. Basically this would depend on what trades have good training provision at my local college I think.

    I can’t do two more years through.

    What’s your plan?

    Premier Icon perchypanther
    Free Member

    I think I’d rather work with wood

    Read this first…

    https://singletrackworld.com/forum/topic/career-change-at-40-how-do-i-become-a-chippy/

    Premier Icon finbar
    Free Member

    Thank you PP. I have read that thread very carefully before. It’s a bit sobering – but equally I might only need to need to clear maybe £15k/yr – so hopefully wouldn’t need to be thrashing myself on-site for 45 hours a week. I’m completely clueless about the realities of working as a tradesperson though, and it’s only one option for the future…

    Premier Icon the-muffin-man
    Full Member

    In your position I’d stick it out then buy some beachside shack and become one of those happy-go-lucky types who spends a few hours in the pub each lunchtime and the rest of their life doing whatever comes their way! 🙂

    Premier Icon perchypanther
    Free Member

    In your position, i’d stick it out and continue to rake in the big bucks whilst finding other ways to relieve  the boredom throughout your working day.

    Have you considered a secret double life as a pretend internet comedy panther?

    Premier Icon TheBrick
    Free Member

    What’s your plan?

    Not sure! Nervous breakdown? Happened before let’s see if I can do it again!

    Ideal world something part time / flexible freelance that averages 3 days a week to pay bills and then gives me 3 days a week to work on side lines / small business that pays but take time to get going.

    Premier Icon martymac
    Full Member

    Yes, you are pretty lucky, you’ve got the essentials sorted.
    If you can manage on 15k a year you have many options available.
    Stick it out til your mortgage is done, then look for a job with hours to suit your life.
    Uber driver?
    Coach driver?
    Loads out there if you’re footloose and fancy free bud.

    Premier Icon retro83
    Free Member

    great. Boris **** johnson

    eta. wrong thread but sentiment still applies

    Premier Icon finbar
    Free Member

    Have you considered a secret double life as a pretend internet comedy panther?

    I can’t imagine that ending well for anyone 🙂

    I think one of the few jobs I would draw the line at is being any sort of driver. Definitely not for me – I’d rather stay chained to this desk …!

    great. Boris **** johnson

    eta. wrong thread but sentiment still applies

    Oh, definitely relevant here. One of our Ministers has just resigned too..

    Premier Icon wrightyson
    Free Member

    You’re clearly an intelligent fella who could probably turn their hand to most things, however are you practically skilled, can you put up more than just a shelf? If you’re anything like decent at joinery you will easily be fetching in more than 15k a year but you will need a large investment in tools (I always think it’s one of the trades that needs the most kit) and will need to be on a steep learning curve. One of the best joiners I’ve had on site was an ex nurse who had just had enough of his profession and decided to be a joiner.

    Premier Icon wrightyson
    Free Member

    Apart from the working in government and only 2 years of mortgage left you have just discibed my situation! ( Couple of years older).

    I can’t do two more years through.

    Are you in construction?

    Premier Icon samperry25
    Free Member

    I’m a few years younger than you but I made the difficult decision 6 years ago to leave the company that trained me and move on to something else that was slightly less pay but on the face of it seemed to be better.

    Of course the reality was a lot different and I ended up travelling the country having arguments with grumpy salesmen about why I couldn’t repair their equipment with the zero spare parts they had provided.

    But I persevered and applied for everything going that I was qualified for which led me nicely to a job 3 miles away from home that I can ride to and has a lot more benefits than I’ve ever had.

    Morale of the story is it will all come good in the end.

    Premier Icon finbar
    Free Member

    …But I persevered and applied for everything going that I was qualified for which led me nicely to a job 3 miles away from home that I can ride to and has a lot more benefits than I’ve ever had.

    Yes, the grass is always greener! Well done though 🙂 .

    …can you put up more than just a shelf?

    No. I can pick practical stuff up pretty quickly, but the repertoire of stuff I’ve actually developed skills & knowledge for is very limited (I do have a grade A in GCSE resistant materials, haha 😀 ). That’s why I reckon I’d need a year or two at college and then an entry-level job with someone to learn the ropes. And I’ve got no issue with sweeping workshop floors for a few months Mr Miyagi-style. If I can stick out another couple of years here, I’ll minimise any financial barriers to that route too. I’d welcome your opinion if you think that’s loony though…?

    Premier Icon Richie_B
    Full Member

    Are you in construction?

    Sounds like he has a pension as well, the majority of people I know working in construction have pension schemes which rely on brass handles

    Edit
    Sorry I’m wrong I know a couple of structural engineers and electricians

    Premier Icon madmechanist
    Free Member

    What you must consider is it pays well. But…

    What’s it doing to you.. Don’t kill yourself over a job..don’t suffer because you don’t actually have too.. If you can manage on lower money you might benefit from a change.. But if you can stand it clear the mortgage and then go on lower pay.. Do something that you enjoy and have fun with it.. It could be a good option and practical jobs aren’t just construction and similar .. What about an apprenticeship in garage or workshop work or something of the like..

    Premier Icon w00dster
    Full Member

    Its a huge decision to make, I was in a similar position about 10 years ago. I’m in a well paid job (Senior Manager IT Contractor, never not been in a contract). Its a stressful job, very long hours. Agreed a plan for early retirement with the wife, I was to continue for a five more years. Unfortunately life gets in the way and I’m now stuck in the job. We have a bigger mortgage, overseas property (which is mortgage free but expensive upkeep) and UK properties that are an overhead until the mortgage on them in cleared.
    The upshot is that my kids will be fine financially, however I’ve ended up being late 40’s and stuck in my career for the foreseeable future. My plan like yourself was to be mortgage free and live on an income of £15k (max) with the wife continuing with her teaching career.
    So my advice is while you have the opportunity make the break. Get yourself into a position where you are comfortable and get re-trained asap.

    Premier Icon TheBrick
    Free Member

    Are you in construction?

    No engineering. Fairly similar I expect in terms of when project management goes wrong it goes really wrong!

    Premier Icon DT78
    Free Member

    mortgage free at 38, wow you are in a privaledged position.

    you’ve described how I feel most days, except I have a 350k mortgage, I’m slightly older and have 2 small children in nursery to support and a house to renovate.

    I’m sucking it up, and dying slowly inside. I have a lot of problems with the physical effects of stress (mostly difficulty breathing) – though weirdly I feel completely fine mentally…..

    Getting both kids into school is my next decision point.

    If I was you I would do something you want to do or you risk getting trapped

    Premier Icon thepurist
    Full Member

    To throw some experience into this thread, I went through this at a similar life stage to the OP.  I got bored and felt redundant at one job so left, then went through the same cycle every 14 months or so for a further 3 jobs before quitting to retrain and start up on my own.  Each time I felt that the new job would make me feel better, but it never did.  After about 8 months I would get to the point where I felt I was doing nothing of value at work, felt bored and dejected and then start looking for the next job to fix everything.  When I resigned some senior boss would usually come along and tell me what a great job I was doing and try to talk/buy me into staying (yeah, swoon at my awsumz).  It was only a few years after setting up on my own (feeling bored and failing TBH) that I had a major near death accident that left me looking for help to get over the psychological effects of the accident, and then uncovered massive mental health issues that I’d just been ignoring and ploughing on through.  Getting them sorted (well, understood at least) has allowed me to go back into a job where I can find some sort of fulfilment even if I’m not feeling that thrilled with day to day stuff right now.

    So to all those who are struggling, please have a think about whether the job is really the issue, or whether it might just be suffering because of something else (TBH I wouldn’t have been able to answer that so it’s a pretty daft question).  If it actually is the job then changing it might help, and life is too short to spend most of your waking hours on something you hate so work out an escape plan and stick to it.  If it’s not the job, you might just end up in the same vicious circle I found myself in and I wouldn’t wish that on anyone.

    Premier Icon scaled
    Free Member

    Just start taking the piss at work and see how long you get away with it before they sack you.

    Sign up for all the vaguely relevent (free) work related jollies you can find, take the time out of work to attend and go ride your bike.

    Premier Icon finbar
    Free Member

    Thank you all, some great food for thought there. Thepurist, firstly, I’m glad you’ve found some degree of fulfilment. I’m not sure if I am scapegoating the job for any wider issues. I don’t think so. I’m generally pretty content most of the time otherwise (country going down the s****er notwithstanding) – but as you say, I suppose you can never know until you try something drastically different.

    DT78, w00dster, TheBrick – I guess we can take some cold comfort in that we’re far from alone. I totally recognise the risk of ‘getting trapped’ (I don’t like the phrase, but I can’t think of a kinder one) with responsibilities for families and possessions and in a cycle of hedonic adaptation. I could work another 10 years and get a flash car and holiday abroad every year, but I absolutely would end up dying inside. At the moment I – no doubt naively – think my plan could still work if we’re fortunate to have (one – no more!) child in the next year or two…

    Madmechanist – I’d be well up for an apprenticeship. If I do make this happen in two years’ time I’ll be looking at them as a hopeful alternative to college (but I’m under no illusions I can walk into one without showing some commitment by starting some qualifications off my own back).

    Just start taking the piss at work and see how long you get away with it before they sack you.

    It’s very possible this might get me promoted given our glorious new leader 😉 !

    Premier Icon shermer75
    Free Member

    Two years is manageable if you spend your time ‘researching'(day dreaming) about your next move. 38 it is fine are to be launching a second career! 🙂

    Premier Icon noclue
    Free Member

    I did it!!

    Crushingly soul destroying job in recruitment. Left and set up my own recruitment firm, two years after realised it was the industry and not the role so sold the company and quit all together.

    My wife and I have a pretty good life now. I freelance as a writer and film maker for four or five days a month and run the odd wild camping course during the summer which gives us enough to have some fun with.

    Some work is vital for your sanity along with your pocket but life’s to short for wasting, doing something you don’t want to do. I blundered in to recruitment then in to opinion piece writing then filming. You can do anything you want, you just have to take the first big scary jump!

    Premier Icon Kahurangi
    Full Member

    A two year plan sounds very reasonable and achievable, best of luck to you. It’ll be tough, but it sounds not too distant 🙂

    Premier Icon globalti
    Free Member

    Nice to be able to pay off the mortgage so young. I’m 63 and this Friday we will have paid ours off after scrimping and saving to overpay heavily since increasing it for our current house 14 years ago. It will feel weird to have money again.

    Premier Icon nickjb
    Free Member

    A 2 year exit doesn’t sound too bad, but I’m still in the “life’s too short” camp. Even a substantial reduction in pay will see the mortgage off in 5 years, even 10 would be pretty good IMO. While being mortgage free would be a nice feeling low interest rates and stable house prices mean it doesn’t matter that much. I’d be seriously looking at options now.

    Premier Icon TheBrick
    Free Member

    Sat in another **** airport to go away again for two weeks of intense stress

    Premier Icon kittyr
    Free Member

    Not sure about the move to be a chippy/plumber/sparky etc – trade work is hard on the body and not something I would look to move into at 40.

    TBH might be worth speaking with a (decent!) life/career coach who has a good knowledge of your industry and what related but more interesting, more flexible options there might be.

    – You said if you went down to 4 days you would just end up doing 5 days work in 4… what about the step down to 3 days?
    – Or are there steps you can take to make it less stressful? (lower the amount of fu**s you give?)
    – Is there anything else adding to the stress like a shitty commute – can that be fixed?
    – More interesting projects to get involved with? Do you have a pet interest at work you can peruse?

    I would also look at other areas of your life and be sure it isn’t general life dissatisfaction that is impacting how you feel at work.

    There is quite a bit of pressure in the modern world to have your job as your passion… but this is not realistic for everyone to quit and become a MTB instructor.

    You are in an unusually flexible financial situation quite young, you are not trapped by mortgage commitments… but maybe that is also making you feel like you ‘should’ be doing something more worthwhile?

    Anyway, basically don’t rush your decision. Takes steps to improve current work situation and check you’re really happy with other areas of your life first.

    Premier Icon shermer75
    Free Member

    I would also recommend a career coach. I paid £60 to chat to someone for one hour and then never looked back. Best thing I ever did!!

Viewing 40 posts - 1 through 40 (of 53 total)

The topic ‘Crushingly bored at work…’ is closed to new replies.