Crashes and the ageing process

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  • Crashes and the ageing process
  • Marmoset
    Member

    Better to not risk stuff and be able to ride the next day IMHO. If I think I’m going to do myself some harm trying something I leave it alone, got a family to support and I’m sure my employer won’t look lightly on regular sports injuries!

    It is noticeable how much longer it takes to heal though, I’m nearly 40 and notice all the scratches and bruises taking more than a week to go away now….

    Legoman
    Member

    Not sure I can fully answer your question but I’ve noticed the same trend myself.

    The one thing I have had to concede is that I get tired a lot quicker than I used to and tiredness is probably the biggest factor in most crashes/near misses (IME). I still like to think I can ride as hard as ever, but tend to tone it down a bit as the legs start to get heavy.

    Premier Icon DezB
    Subscriber

    Feel exactly the same.
    I used to actually enjoy some crashes, bit of bruising makes you feel alive ๐Ÿ™‚ Now, it’s a pain (literally)
    Definitely take less chances than I did 10 years ago. I have no other solution!

    johnellison
    Member

    Invest in some lightweight protective gear? Ride more within your limits?

    Premier Icon roverpig
    Subscriber

    Well just knowing I’m not alone is a help ๐Ÿ™‚

    I’m going to have a good hard think about why I ride and what it is that makes me want to ride down stuff that I know will hurt me sooner or later. Maybe I’ll find some answers there.

    Premier Icon zilog6128
    Subscriber

    Take up road riding?

    banks
    Member

    I ride with a guy who’s well over twice my age – he’s showing no sign of slowing down, i think so anyway because i can’t keep up with him!

    Lace up those 5:10s and get to Antur Stiniog ๐Ÿ˜€

    Premier Icon DezB
    Subscriber

    zilog6128 – Member
    Take up road riding?

    He’s old, not senile.

    mojo5pro
    Member

    I’m 45 and have had a couple of offs recently that resulted in time off bike. I’m currentlyy unable to ride due to a fractured radial head which has restricted more than just riding.
    However, a big part of what I like to ride is techy, rocky and challenging myself. A lot is luck as to how or what you land on. You can easily have a nasty crash just by clipping a pedal on an innocent trail.
    So, as soon as I’m healed I’m off to tackle the drop-off that fractured my arm. Not as daft as it sounds as I’ve done it many times before so I need do to nail again so it doesn’t become a confidence issue.

    popmatik
    Member

    I’m self employed so that runs through my mind whenever I come up to a jump. It’s made me more cautious but I still get tons of enjoyment out of riding without pushing myself to be daft. I wear knee and elbow pads too… As a programmer I can’t afford to have broken things connected to my arms!

    Premier Icon nedrapier
    Subscriber

    Ride without any protective gear at all? That might change your mindset more.

    Edit: and take a camera instead (preferably an expensive one!)

    Premier Icon iainc
    Subscriber

    similar here, rapidly approaching 48. This was part of my decision process earlier in the year when I went from a short travel hardtail and a fuss susser to a more do it all hardtail. I reckoned I might ride a bit slower than I would on the 5 and hence crash less. Don’t rally think it’s made much difference yet ๐Ÿ™‚

    I’m fifty eight and I still like to get out,I’m never gonna set the world on fire but I enjoy it .I suspect that I’m not doing anything as technical as you and I do find myself dithering a bit when others are pushing on. I have recently bought a santa cruz blur and it has really lifted my riding and I’m doing stuff I would have previously gibbed at , only a matter of time before it goes tits up…………..

    perthmtb
    Member

    Just turned 50 here, and off MTB with a herniated disc in my back, probably for about six months! Have seriously considered whether I should try to pick it up again or just buy a set of lawn bowls ๐Ÿ™

    Have decided I’d really miss the fresh air, camaraderie, and challenge of MTB, so will definitely aim to get back on the bike. Anyway, as the Physio said to me – you’re better off keeping up a sport of some kind or you’ll be more likely to get back/knee/etc. problems because of weight gain and inactivity.

    However, I have to accept I will probably never get back to the same level of fitness I was when I stopped, and will also probably tone down the technicality of what I ride in the future, and leave the races for the younger set.

    hora
    Member

    MiL once complained about me sitting their injuried. I said

    I’ll stop moving when I’m dead.

    Premier Icon roverpig
    Subscriber

    I had a little off a few weeks back that resulted in a nice deep gash on my hip. The good folk at A&E patched me up and all went well, but it still took 3 weeks before it stopped weeping gunk enough to risk a gentle ride and I was forced to confront the fact that, as I head towards 50 injuries take noticeably longer to heal than they used to.

    The question is whether I should modify my riding to allow for this. My first thought was “hell no, just MTFU and get back on the trails”. But, no matter how much I may want to tough it out, the fact is that, if it’s going to take increasingly longer for each injury to heal, I could end up spending more time recovering than riding. Worse than that, each crash dents my motivation to ride and each spell off the bike means a loss of hard won fitness.

    I’m not about to hang up my Five Tens and retire to the tow paths (even if we had any), but I am wondering whether some changes might be in order.

    I know the stock response will be a skills course, but I’m not so sure. I’ve been on one, it was great, but as my skills improved I just rode faster and looked for harder stuff to test myself on, which resulted in bigger crashes. I think what is really needed is a change of mindset.

    Premier Icon slowoldgit
    Subscriber

    I find it’s still fun and quality time in the fresh air, even though I can’t do what the big boys do.

    Would it help to go for more distance, less descent?

    hora
    Member

    On STW people keep talking about learning jumping etc. I just want to enjoy my singletrack, future-proof myself and keep going out there as long as possible.

    Villages are full of old characters who used to be really into their rugby but are now lardy, can hardly move due to bad injuries.

    **** that.

    mojo5pro
    Member

    hora, How do you ‘future proof’ yourself?

    Premier Icon wwaswas
    Subscriber

    hora, How do you ‘future proof’ yourself?

    behave as if you have dementia from an early age?

    Premier Icon rOcKeTdOg
    Subscriber

    I used to own a shop, one old boy in his 90’s used to come in every day, round trip of 20 miles on his bike, liked a fag, liked his ale, they found him dead in a hedge row next to his bike. Natural cause, just dropped deaddoing something he enjoyed. I’ve always aspired to ride for as long as I can like he did. Don’t hold back, live life to the full it’s too short not to.

    mojo5pro
    Member

    or for longer term future proofing…elongate you’re head, enlarge your eyes, wizen your arms and say “phone home’

    mindmap3
    Member

    I’ve only recently turned 30 but have noticed that I take longer to recover from crashes than I used to.

    I came off at Cannock last week (yes, I know riding a trail centre I deserve everything that I get) and removed a fair chunk of skin from my right knee in a very silly crash. Its taking ages to heal and is only now not restricting walking / pedalling although it still hurts like hell to kneel on it.

    Had a big OTB crash earlier in the year and the bruises took ages to go.

    I’ll ride for as long as I can / still enjoy it.

    Premier Icon DezB
    Subscriber

    they found him dead in a hedge row next to his bike. Natural cause..

    That’s the way to go ๐Ÿ™‚

    I crashed and broke my arm two weeks ago turning on some fire road!

    If I’d been doing something stupid then I’d considder slowing down a bit, but I wasn’t! The only ‘safe’ option is a road bike.

    Premier Icon FOG
    Subscriber

    My wife keeps waiting for me to grow up but she has been waiting a while now with little progress despite getting my pension next year. Just ride what you want, you will self censor anything beyond your ability just like you always did without realising it. Of course this will go wrong sometimes but don’t give up, just recalibrate.I was never that good BITD but I keep getting out and riding and don’t feel I am getting massively worse. The problem I have is stamina seems to be more of an issue. I could never beat my mates up hills but I could keep going longer, sadly that is no longer the case but I just tailor rides to what I know will be doable. Ride till you drop which if statistics are to be believed will be 3 years later than most of the general public.

    Premier Icon roverpig
    Subscriber

    Don’t hold back, live life to the full it’s too short not to

    That’s pretty much my philosophy. But sitting on a couch waiting for my injuries to heal isn’t really living life to the full. I think I’ve basically got two choices: learn to enjoy riding within my limits rather than always pushing them, or accept that I’m going to be spending an ever increasing amount of time off the bike recovering.

    perthmtb
    Member

    The only ‘safe’ option is a road bike.

    Don’t know if its just round these parts, but although my MTB buddies are always suffering from a graze/bruise/gash here and there, the incidence of really serious injury is much more among my road biking friends – usually from a pile-up in the peloton, or an argument with a two ton lump of steel and glass!

    mojo5pro
    Member

    Roverpig…how many of your crashes are by pushing yourelf beyond your limits or how many are just complacency or badluck? mine are the latter.

    Put some proper mudguards on your bike – you’ll instantly ride like a grandad

    Dog Ears
    Member

    Probably one of the older guys riding at 64 and I have re-evaluated my riding as of late. It takes a hell of a time to recover from injuries and it’s no joke not being able to ride.
    Tend to leave the real techy stuff alone now as I find myself thinking a bit too much as you approach those type of trails obstacles!
    It also takes about half an hour to fully warm up when I start riding; still I’ve told my other half to have me put down if I start looking at road bikes.

    hora
    Member

    Wwaswas:

    Oil/joint supplements
    Listen to your body. Got a cold Chill instead.
    Dont ride with a hangover.
    If you dont feel comfortable riding a technical bit. Walk it. No one else will wipe your ass, soap that hard to reach armpit or pay your mortgage.

    Etc.

    In addition somedays I feel good so I ride. Other days I feel stressed so I ride slow and daydream.

    Premier Icon brassneck
    Subscriber

    I went to a long travel hardtail from a full susser to try and slow down a bit, after taking out a wrist earlier this year, which stopped biking for longer that I’d like.

    Trouble is, modern hardtails are nice’n’slack and I think I’m actually faster now.. but definitely more stable.

    hora
    Member

    I found that with wider bars I’m alot more stable. (Touch wood) I’ve not crashed since I did my rotor cuff c2yrs ago. Could it be that I’m a tallish/big bloke and the extra leverage etc really suits me? I was on 685’s. Went to 711, not a massive difference and I’m NOT in anyshape or form a wheels of the ground/gnarly rider.

    Could be the same ^^^ I just feel alot more stable on the bike.

    hora
    Member

    So I’ve gone two years without a fall and I had two in one weekend this weekend.
    Zero injuries and rapid deceleration. Weird.

    Premier Icon Potdog
    Subscriber

    I’m 46 and also managed a fractured radial head like Mojo5pro. I did mine at the end of April. Had a total of 12 weeks off the bike and still have restricted range in my elbow joint. Have been told it could take up to 12 months to get as near to normal as is possible ๐Ÿ˜ฏ

    Am riding again and rebuilding my shot fitness, but still not 100% comfortable as the elbow aches like hell in the rough stuff! But, that said, I’m determined to get back to where I was, especially as the crash that caused it was a silly front wheel wash out on an “easy” trail!

    lasty
    Member

    Raced those motorcycle things up to re-discovering mountain biking.
    Had a BIG off on the racer resulting in a badly dislocated shoulder which was agony and took months before it was anything like comfortable. I wasnt happy about this but a doctor mate just turned around one day and put it in a nutshell…

    “youre 46 years old” ….

    Id been racing over 20 years but never really thought about the age related healing issue – Hello STW…..

    loughor
    Member

    Loving this. In similar situation. I always back off if unsure. A week off the bike would drive me insane. I just enjoy riding and smirk at the youngsters, end in tears, that will

    Premier Icon stilltortoise
    Subscriber

    ALL of this ^ rings so true it’s scary ๐Ÿ˜†

    In the last two years I’ve had two silly crashes on my mountain bike that left me in A & E. Neither were on difficult terrain nor was I “going silly”. The other weekend I had another moment were I mysteriously ended up on the floor, but at least that time the nurses were spared.

    As for road riding, that gave me a broken collarbone and 3 months off riding. In the last 11 months I’ve had 4 months of not riding due to injury. Not good.

    On a serious note, I have considered building some more muscle. My cycling fitness is OK, but I’ve not got a lot of muscle protecting those bones and joints. Maybe middle age is atrophying my muscles and that’s why falls hurt more.

    I remember being of my bike for month with broken bones and ligament injuries in my 20’s and 30’s. S**t happens.

    You just have to accept that you’re going to crash sometimes and sometimes it could keep you off the bike for some time. I don’t think it’s especially an age thing. In fact, as I’ve less to prove I think I take less stupid risks. I still take stupid risks – usually in the moment – but that’s what makes riding in the woods so much fun.

    I know guys still riding and falling off in their 70’s. Their spirit inspires me. Check this out…70 and still going over the bars
    https://fbcdn-sphotos-g-a.akamaihd.net/hphotos-ak-prn2/p480x480/254651_10200511290852651_1116380238_n.jpg

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