Costs and steps of building a garage

Home Forum Chat Forum Costs and steps of building a garage

Viewing 30 posts - 1 through 30 (of 30 total)
  • Costs and steps of building a garage
  • strike
    Member

    Looking to potentially do this in the next 12months.  What I know/think I know is (!):

    – it’s going to be brick with a flat roof and free-stand with at least a single door plus an up-and-over main door

    – it would be in the back garden and as far as I can tell, would not require planning permission

    – I may dig the footings myself

    – what would be the approximate costs of materials for the building structure/roof alone plus labour?

    – for the floor section, which would be screed concrete, what does the base consist of and at which point of building is the floor laid?

    Premier Icon jimdubleyou
    Subscriber

    which point of building is the floor laid?

    Unless you want **$£ *%”$*£^*& cat/fox paw prints in your floor, I suggest you do the final surface after the building is secure.

    nickjb
    Member

    Depends how good you want the floor and what your footings are. Mine is a raft foundation, basically a single slab with thicker edges and was all poured in one. Quicker and easier imo as it’s less digging and a single pour but it does need to be designed right and needs steel reinforcement. The finished surface is ok but not perfect. The other method is strip foundations. You dig a trench, then fill that with concrete, then build up to floor level, then pour the floor. Once that is done you build the walls.

    I did everything myself, used second hand materials wherever possible (doors, window, reclaimed timber, crushed my own MOT, etc) and still spent about £3k. That’s for a decent build, fully insulated. No idea about labour. I did try and get some quotes but couldn’t get many builders to turn up and only one came back with a very vague price.

    As for planning permission you usually don’t need it unless you want the roof over 2.5m or you are in a conservation area/listed building/national park. There are other rules so you need to check but those are the most common. I went for planning as I wanted some extra headroom. Very glad I did.

    Premier Icon wwaswas
    Subscriber

    Brick will massively increase costs over a sectional building. You could get a pad poured and get a concrete sectional building (traditionally concrete panels but other materials now available) added to that and insulated if needed.

    What will it be used for? If it’s car maint consider getting a work pit fitted to avoid having to lift cars – lot easier working standing up than flat on your back.

    An angled roof would allow you to fit skylights more easily with less risk of leaks I’d suspect and allow a lot more light in.

    strike
    Member

    I would go for strip foundations with brick/single-skin walls.  I’ll never be parking a car inside the garage and essentially it will be used as a workshop/shed.  I’ll also source a 2nd hand PVC side door and up-and-over door to keep costs down.  No windows orskylights so as to keep security to a maximum. Also keen on a pitched/tiled roof for the extra storage room in the rafters.  Size-wise I’m think approx. 5m X 3m.

    Premier Icon simon_g
    Subscriber

    Watching as I’m planning something similar. Quite fancy a timber frame one though, want to be able to get some insulation in so I have some scope for noisier stuff in the evenings.

    https://www.ukworkshop.co.uk/forums/workshop-builds-tours-f35.html has plenty of advice and examples of DIY builds.

    wrightyson
    Member

    Strip found, 900 deep 600 wide all depending on ground conditions. Days digging one lorry load away 400 quid if you drive it yourself 500 if not. Pour 8m3 approx 560

    Build 2 100mm leafs with just a 75mm cavity and it will be a much nicer place, also won’t require any mid reinforcing piers as a single skin would. Approx 30m2 of brickwork and blockwork, at worst factor quid a block so 300 quid, bricks can be had for 300 a thou so 600 quid. Brickie to build 200 a day allowing max of 6/7 Days including gables once you’ve got the roof on. Brickwork to wall plate done off trestles then scaff for roof and gables. Props 600 quid for short hire.

    Trusses order on line piece of piss to erect, prices vary on what you want. Could have attic trusses then you’ll have whole roof space open.

    Roofer 3/4 days materials vary on price quite a bit so research.

    If you’re capable, lay the floor after completion due to the time  of year if not get it up to damp and screed off at the bricks, far easier for a non pro. Just over 2m3 ( 250 quid) of c40 with one layer of a193 mesh at 150mm thick, all laid on 150mm of type 1 (4t bags 120 quid). Don’t forget your dpm.

    Allow for ties insulation etc.

    Genuinely though referring to my first point build it with a cavity, so much better, even for say something as simple as fixing shelves. Get it wrong when drilling more than 60mm into your single skin for a very lightweight fixing and you’ll have a nice spelched brick on the outside. Plus it won’t be damp and will be far warmer.

    Premier Icon duckman
    Subscriber

    Wrightyson, you wouldn’t be a clerk of works/ estimator would you? 😀

    Premier Icon stumpyjon
    Subscriber

    I’d second wrightyson, put a cavity wall up. Wish I had when I extended my garage, the existing garage was single skin with support piers. I waterproofed it with a liner, 50mm batons and 12mm ply with insulation, probably cost more and took longer than building the inner skin. I’d also go pitched roof, probably easier to erect and make waterproof.

    I laid my floor before building the walls, good work surface but tended to turn into a pond when it rained, I skimmed after completion to get a level surface. Materials I’d be looking at 5 to 6k, mine cost over 10k but that included a lot of fitting out, cupboards, electrics etc.

    wrightyson
    Member

    Just a lowly construction site manager,  setting out engineer, fork lift driver, groundworker, joiner, brickie and labourer really 🤪

    redmex
    Member

    Wrightyson thats some foundation for a domestic garage 5 m x3 m 900 mm deep and 8 cube of concrete and only £70 a cube

    DT78
    Member

    would people recommend brick over timber then?

    My build is probably 2-3 years away, but I was planning on a concrete pad, dwarf walls to about waist height and then timber – with solid insulation inside and ply lined.

    Silly idea?  I have no real experience – but given I was planning on doing the work myself I thought dwarf walls would be easier for a noob to manage

    Premier Icon 40mpg
    Subscriber

    Foundation and floor design will depend on ground conditions. I would suggest investing in a strutural engineer for a couple of hundred quid to save you a) over engineering an expensive foundation

    B) having a garage full of cracks if you under design

    They can do same for walls and roof too.

    Disclosure- I’m a construction estimator (but not domestic stuff)

    Edit don’t forget drainage for the roof! Unless you’re in a very well drained area and can accommodate a suitable sized soakaway a suitable distance from the garage and other buildings, you’ll need to connect into the surface water drainage system. This may require water authority approval?

    only £70 a cube

    That’s what I’m  thinking!  I’ve just bought a s/h timber double garage for £500 and now need a 6m x 6m slab and currently pricing whether to go for poured or beam and block (it’s a sloping site with a bit of a muck shift needed).  I’m expecting £100+ per cube…

    Premier Icon 40mpg
    Subscriber

    Dt78 unless you’ve got experience of bricklaying I’d avoid or get a pro in. It’s a real skill to get right and look good.

    Perhaps go for a timber frame kit which would be much easier. Can be insulated between studs, clad externally however you fancy, and line with ply for fixing to.

    Premier Icon 40mpg
    Subscriber

    Concrete we are paying £128 to £132 a cube depending on mix (ex vat) for volumes exceeding 1000m3

    andy3809
    Member

    Unless it’s its going to be multi-storey I think the suggested footings are a little over the top!

    With steel in them as well as c40 at 600mm wide they would support a planet

    wrightyson
    Member

    C28/35 last week at £68.32 a m3 on special, usually £72.38 but we had a little fall out, put just short of 700m3 in the ground over the last 3 week’s. I did forget the vat bit tho and quoted on my prices. Anybody paying over 75m3 plus vat for a basic found C16/20 on a blend with big quants is being ripped off. C40 was for the floor slab with mesh, 900 deep for founds was just an average punt on ground conditions for pricing. But hey what do I know 😉

    wrightyson
    Member

    Oh and here’s some I put in earlier this week, just for the non believers. Check that bolt line 😉

    ^^ where in the UK?  I’m intrigued (in the price).

    wrightyson
    Member

    7 miles out of derby.

    Hmm, in rural Devon there obviously isn’t enough supplier competition.

    That’s going to be a big garage when it’s finished…..must be for trail-rats campervan

    andy3809
    Member

    Started out as a site engineer many moons ago and really miss it at the moment now I’m stuck behind a desk.

    That photo didn’t help! Loved doing groundwork’s and bolt boxes/portal frames

    redmex
    Member

    Your building Wrightyson is a huge commercial warehouse with 900 deep founds, 18  tonnes of concrete to be barrowed around the back garden of the house will take a wee while longer than half an hour and c40  for the floor slab would be setting and unworkable for a novice, what about added cost of bunyan, dumper, and power float. Expensive garage this is working out

    40 mpg could price this job for us

    wrightyson
    Member

    Ok redmex, lay a shitty c20 for the floor with a blend and wait 4 hours before you can get a trowel on it in autumn/winter. Ideal that.

    And btw my strip founds are 450 deep and column bases 600, tsall about the ground pressure.

    My “advice/costing” was all a bit 6 am this morning and a bit broad within it’s spectrum admittedly. If it’s worth building build it properly, please see the other thread about the single skin garage pissing water in.

    Only trying to help after all.

    wrightyson
    Member

    Condensate like a bastard in winter if you so much as breathe inside them. Allow for insulating then all good. Basically all my site accomadation are based on those but insulated an then lined.

    Premier Icon stumpyjon
    Subscriber

    Brick laying isn’t that difficult, get the mortar mix right, take your time, use a string line and spirit levels, make sure everything is square and level as you go. I peaked at 100 bricks per day including mixing my own mortar. Walls are pretty straight and true.

    footflaps
    Member

    Mine is a raft foundation, basically a single slab with thicker edges and was all poured in one. Quicker and easier imo as it’s less digging and a single pour but it does need to be designed right and needs steel reinforcement.

    This is what we did for our 8x4m workshop. We had 12.5 m3 pumped to the site as I couldn’t be bothered with mixing it all….

    [url=https://flic.kr/p/daJgeX]Concrete pumping truck[/url] by Ben Freeman, on Flickr

    [url=https://flic.kr/p/daJjSC]Pumping concrete 60m[/url] by Ben Freeman, on Flickr

    [url=https://flic.kr/p/daJjxc]Pumping concrete 60m[/url] by Ben Freeman, on Flickr

    [url=https://flic.kr/p/daJJhs]The finished slab![/url] by Ben Freeman, on Flickr

    Then about a year later, I got round to building the actual workshop, with an entertaining thread on here about brickies:

    https://singletrackworld.com/forum/topic/rate-my-brickie/

    The end result:

    [url=https://flic.kr/p/VPn8VS]Workshop[/url] by Ben Freeman, on Flickr

Viewing 30 posts - 1 through 30 (of 30 total)

You must be logged in to reply to this topic.