Commuters – Mudguard advice

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  • Commuters – Mudguard advice
  • Premier Icon oop north
    Subscriber

    I’m going to start commuting in the near future, 14 miles on canal paths and roads. I’m wanting to add mudguards, preferably full length, but my Whyte Saxon cross only has fixing holes at the dropouts, it has no bridge to fix a common mudguard bracket to it. Plus there is not much clearance to get a full length mudguard on the rear due to the bend in the seat stay above the wheel.

    What are my options, should I buy SKS Raceblade Pro XL’s and accept some water on my feet and lower parts of the bike?
    Is it worth having mudguards on rough canals paths, as it may cause rubbing and noise? What do the STW canal commuters use?

    Premier Icon Bez
    Subscriber

    You can usually make use of mudguard/light brackets to get round the absence of a seatstay bridge, eg as used on this Longitude:

    https://forum.cyclinguk.org/viewtopic.php?t=93462

    I’m not familiar with the Whyte but a quick image google suggests there’s enough clearance behind the seat tube, depending on what tyre’s you’re using of course, but I don’t know what the chainstay region looks like. But again reflector brackets can be used: I’ve got one on one of my Crossrips to give more clearance than is available when mounted at the chainstay bridge.

    As for rattling/rubbing, IME the rear is fine, especially if you don’t add a flap or a light to the guard (and remove any heavy rubber flaps if you’re using it on rough terrain). The front tends to be more the issue: if it’s long enough to give half decent coverage for your feet (which usually also necessitates a flap) then it can slap about a bit on rough stuff. Normally just a slight annoyance rather than a problem, though it can be when you take one hand off the bars. Up to you whether you want to do without a flap or even cut the guard shorter to make it more stable.

    IME metal guards are a lot stiffer than plastic ones, so consider things like PDWs, though they’re quite spendy. But I’ve used full plastic guards off-road plenty and they’re ok.

    Certainly I’d prefer to put up with the downsides of having guards than the downsides of not having them. And FWIW all the half-hearted guards (clip-ons etc) that I’ve tried have been rubbish, I’d stick with proper ones.

    Premier Icon jamiep
    Subscriber

    SKS Speedrocker is a bit more (£40 from Mantel) but is very stable for clip-ons and adjustable. The rear isn’t very long though

    Premier Icon kelron
    Subscriber

    I have the raceblades. They’re a little rattly but very secure for how easy they are to remove. Might be better options if you want something on permanently.

    nbt
    Member

    I use mudguards for all my commutes – I vary my routes but canals and muddy lanes feature heavily. I’ve 35mm tyres on the CX so I run 45mm mudguards – they’re shaped to allow for the chainstay bending near the drivetrain. SKS bleumels are my guard of choice

    as for the bridge – hmm. worth asking whyte directly perhaps, to see what they recommend

    sarawak
    Member

    I used SKS Longboards on my towpath rides. Nothing reached my shoes. The front curves right round and catches everything. OK they are plastic but there is minimal rattle from them. You’ll need to cobble together a bridge whichever way you go.

    lardman
    Member

    I use a Topeak Defender M2 on my gravel bike and my commuter.
    Attaching to the seat post, they can drop down as close to the wheel as needed.

    they work well IMHO….

    Premier Icon oop north
    Subscriber

    Whyte rear stays

    This should help to show the rear clearance and lack of bridge

    Premier Icon oop north
    Subscriber

    [url=https://flic.kr/p/2g9Nfm4]whyte saxon cross[/url] by Julian Pinder, on Flickr

    Premier Icon epicyclo
    Subscriber

    oop north

    Is it worth having mudguards on rough canals paths…

    It’s worth having mudguards anywhere dogs can shit.

    Unless you enjoy being speckled with emulsified dog shit.

    Premier Icon oop north
    Subscriber

    It’s worth having mudguards anywhere dogs can shit.

    Haha good point

    sarawak
    Member

    Didn’t Whyte supply dedicated mudguards? I was looking at a Whyte Wessex and there were specific guards available from Whyte. Might just have been that one model, but might be worth asking them.

    Premier Icon Bez
    Subscriber

    FWIW another option at the seatstays is to drill a couple of carefully-positioned holes in each side of the guard and then zip tie them to the stays.

    Personally I find zip ties utterly abhorrent, but I’m aware that many people take a milder view 🙂

    Premier Icon oop north
    Subscriber

    Cheers all, I’m considering the SKS Speedrocker, pretty much full coverage without the need of the bridge.
    Whyte do their own mudguards but don’t seem to cover my model.

    TiRed
    Member

    Sks is standard answer and I have longboards on one bike. And p35s on another. I run many many types including carbon fibre. They need a rear stay bridge or they rattle and will then snap.

    In this case you need curano mudguards. Not cheap but no rear stay required.

    https://m.bikester.co.uk/curana-clite-mud-guard-set-45-mm-wide-black-532860.html

    Premier Icon nwmlarge
    Subscriber

    Whyte do a set of mudguards specifically with the bridges to suit the bikes like yours.

    I have a Glencoe with the Whyte mudguards fitted with the bridge pieces.

    Contact your local dealer and get them to order them in specifically.

    i have the Satin black ones, really tidy and not rattly.

    philjunior
    Member

    Should you find your chosen mudguards move about a bit, well placed helitape should stop any paint removal/wearing away of material from the frame and forks.

    Whilst I’m lazy and haven’t got round to replenishing my stocks, it does last better than the alternative (insulating tape).

    Premier Icon nedrapier
    Subscriber

    nwmlarge seems to know what he’s on about.

    Alternative would be p-clips on the stays with a strip of metal in between, and hang your favourite SKS off that.

    I wonder if you would really see much rub even without the seatstay fixture. If you are able to use double stays at the rear and the guard is fixed at the chain stay bb it should be fairly secure. If not, one or two p-clips or a adapted light bracket should allow you to securely fix it. If you are going to use a pannier rack you can also use various bought or bodged fixtures to support the mudguard from the rack rather than the frame.

    I prefer the black plastic tortec guards to SKS.

    Most guards can be fitted with the use of a seat stay collar that you can add

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