Commuter lights Q's

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  • Commuter lights Q's
  • bristolbiker
    Member

    OK, it’s proper dark on the way home now which has got me thinking about light upgrades again…….

    On one bike I just have a Cateye EL520 (IIRC) to be seen by, which is just about fine, but if the road is damp it seems to suck the life out of the beam on unlit sections of cyclepath. What’s the best 4xAA light out there at the moment to replace the Cateye? Seen this http://www.wiggle.co.uk/hope-vision-1-led-front-light-2012/ which look pretty good for the money. Anything else to have a look at?

    On the other bike I have a hub dynamo, currently running a B+M Cyo lamp. Again this is fine, but I am drawn towards a replacing the Cyo with a Revo lamp and then plugging in a Redeye rear light at the same time. Is a Revo going to be too bright/too floody on the road? Also, what are the mounting options for the lamp? Really want it mounted to the fork crown like the Cyo but can’t find out much info about this at the mo (yes, I will email Exposure at some point 😉

    Ta in advance as always.

    CraigW
    Member

    For a battery light, I would look at something like the Philips Saferide 80 lux. It has a proper beam shape for on-road.

    For dynamo, if you want to upgrade I’d go for the new B&M IQ2 Luxos. Again, it has a proper beam shape, so doesn’t dazzle traffic. Like the Cyo, it can be attached to the fork crown.

    TurnerGuy
    Member

    That Hope is a bit old now and is a bit outclassed by other stuff around.

    The cateye you have is also pretty poor.

    The AA requirement restricts you a bit – I have a couple of cateye EL130s which I normally have on alternate flash which is good for visibility, but I can put one or both to constant to get a better beam if needed.

    Have a look at torchy’s site for some comparisons, although that page hasn’t been updated it has the Hope and a Cateye like yours.

    http://www.torchythebatteryboy.com/p/bike-light-database.html

    I have that Fluxient T6 mini which is very bright, although I was using it on solid when I was knocked off my bike in February and hurt my shoulder. That Fluxient on strobe would be too much in traffic.

    You might be best going for an exposure flash and a spare rechareable – as it has a nice pulse function whilst giving a beam, or you can have it on solid where it is brighter, but won’t last as long.

    bristolbiker
    Member

    The AA requirement restricts you a bit

    Agreed, and also agreed the EL520 is a poor (used to run two, picked them up on sale at a silly price years ago, which was better), but them’s the rules ;-)…..

    That Hope is a bit old now and is a bit outclassed by other stuff around

    Proabaly true, but what ‘other stuff’ should I be looking at which is betterer?

    I’d go for the new B&M IQ2 Luxos

    Trying to go away form B+M, only as most of their rear lights are designed around rack mount (which I don’t have/want) – with Exposure I can use the RedEye, or Supernova’s rear light is very compact and post mountable…… but if I got and E3 triple, I fear I’d always be thinking about the Revo while, ahem, using it….

    TurnerGuy
    Member

    There is also this cataeye:

    http://road.cc/content/review/47183-cateye-jido-au-230-front-light

    that takes AAs.

    I have one in the garage unused as it is quite bulky comapred to my EL130s, which I like as I can have one either side of the stem and point it slightly outwards, thus increasing the spread and the angle it can be seen at.

    Plus the flash is not dazzlingly bright – as I think strobing/pulsing is a must to draw drivers attention to the light – a solid light is too insignificant on a bike unless it is stupidly bright, when it is then a danger.

    thomthumb
    Member

    new phillips dynamo light that is not a rack mount.

    shame i can’t find it to buy!!

    http://www.philips.co.uk/c/Bicycle%20bulbs/srrdlgblx1/prd/

    drlex
    Member

    Awaiting RobDean’s input – I have both the Philips SafeRide 80 & 60 (dynamo version, crown mount) but am eyeing up the Revo. Would also consider getting the Shutter Precision dynamo laced onto a light rim for the road bike to double up the value of the Revo.

    Premier Icon Mr Agreeable
    Subscriber

    You can mix and match rear dynamo lights I think, apart from Supernova. Peter White Cycles has lots of info.

    Rob reckons the Revo is a good commuter light if you angle it down a bit. The E3 Triple is an off road light, so it has a round beam shape (I think it’s actually not legal for road use in Germany). Also has less stand light power, and is a bit of a faff to disconnect if you want to remove it.

    paddy0091
    Member

    go on ebay, and spend £30 on something very bright and rechargeable from China.

    tonyd
    Member

    AA requirement rules them out, but if you want to consider other options I’d recommend the Exposure flash/flare. I recently got these and they’re great. I also bought some spare rechargeable batteries as burn time stated 3 hours and my commute is 2 hours round trip, but using the always on flash setting I’ve gone past 8-10 hours before changing them and then only just in case.

    I supplement them with an old (240 lumen) helmet mounted joystick on the lowest setting and an ‘always on’ random cateye something or other on the back.

    I’m now considering a redeye with a long cable just for that extra ‘here I am/happy Xmas’ effect.

    bristolbiker
    Member

    go on ebay, and spend £30 on something very bright and rechargeable from China.

    We’re still taking about lights here, right? 😉

    robdeanhove
    Member

    Revo vs. E3 Triple: The Revo is brighter. A simple case of 4 LEDs vs. 3LEDs and dynamos put out constant current, so more LEDs = more brightness, no matter what the marketing numbers. I have owned both, the Revo was brighter the E3 is sold and I now have a revo each for me and my girlfriend. The Revo is also lighter and has a standlight that is so much more powerful and longer burning the comparison to the E3 triple is almost ludicrous. The RRP of these lights is £250 for the E3 triple and £200 for the Revo. I declare it a non-contest!

    Both the E3 triple and the Revo have conical light patterns, I just rotate the bar clamp slightly to point more downwards for commuting so as not to dazzle oncoming traffic, the Exposure mount is stiff enough that I can do it up such that the light does not move or vibrate, even on rough off road, but can be rotated by hand. This is helped by the fact that the Revo weights only 87g!

    I use the Redeye at the back as a rear light, this is kept alive by the light’s standlight when I stop at junctions. Battery lights now seem like such a faff.

    When I first started using the Revo, pointing straight ahead, I did get flashed quite regularly by oncoming traffic to tell me it was dazzling, I quickly pointed it downward and with plenty of forward light projection still, I no longer get flashed by traffic. During my dynamo experiments I loaned my lights to a friend, who was a dynamo sceptic (and long time sufferer of my enthusiasm for dynamos) and his experiences were the same, he loved the simplicity of a dynamo, but was moaning about the triple compared to the output of a MaXx-D battery light, but when he used my Revo his only complaint was “it’s a bit bright” i.e. much brighter than his expectations and the E3, but that this was fixed by pointing it down on his road bike. He now runs a Revo 😉

    robdeanhove
    Member

    Revo vs. E3 Triple: The Revo is brighter. A simple case of 4 LEDs vs. 3LEDs and dynamos put out constant current, so more LEDs = more brightness, no matter what the marketing numbers. I have owned both, my Revo was brighter and far prefereable in useful characteristics the E3 is sold and I now have a revo each for me and my girlfriend. The Revo is also lighter and has a standlight that is so much more powerful and longer burning the comparison to the E3 triple is almost ludicrous. The RRP of these lights is £250 for the E3 triple and £200 for the Revo. I declare it a non-contest!

    Standlight, it’s pretty bright!:

    Both the E3 triple and the Revo have conical light patterns, I just rotate the bar clamp slightly to point more downwards for commuting so as not to dazzle oncoming traffic, the Exposure mount is stiff enough that I can do it up such that the light does not move or vibrate, even on rough off road, but can be rotated by hand. This is helped by the fact that the Revo weights only 87g!

    I use the Redeye at the back as a rear light, this is kept alive by the light’s standlight when I stop at junctions. Battery lights now seem like such a faff.

    When I first started using the Revo, pointing straight ahead, I did get flashed quite regularly by oncoming traffic to tell me it was dazzling, I quickly pointed it downward and with plenty of forward light projection still, I no longer get flashed by traffic. During my dynamo experiments I loaned my lights to a friend, who was a dynamo sceptic (and long time sufferer of my enthusiasm for dynamos) and his experiences were the same, he loved the simplicity of a dynamo, but was moaning about the triple compared to the output of a MaXx-D battery light, but when he used my Revo his only complaint was “it’s a bit bright” i.e. much brighter than his expectations and the E3, but that this was fixed by pointing it down on his road bike. He now runs a Revo 😉

    Premier Icon slowboydickie
    Subscriber

    I just picked up some Magicshine lights with 1000 lumens for £69 posted. Not dynamo but rechargeable. They do a package with a front / rear with one battery pack and splitter cable for not much more. Definitely worth considering.

    bristolbiker
    Member

    OK, Revo/RedEye it is then. Just need to confirm the mouting options with Exposure…..

    robdeanhove
    Member

    I just picked up some Magicshine lights with 1000 lumens for £69 posted

    I ride with a few people with these lights. The 800lumen Revo and an older 1000lumen MaXx-D are significantly brighter than the claimed 1000lumens of these cheap lights, although they do put out plenty of light for riding I will concede.

    In our office there’s several of them, currently two are broken after just a few weeks of commuting in the dark! You pays your money you pays your choice.

    Premier Icon Simon E
    Subscriber

    A number of comparisons here:
    http://road.cc/content/news/69237-big-roadcc-lights-test-2012

    Last year’s less fancy but still useful lights test:
    http://road.cc/content/news/46538-big-roadcc-lights-test-data

    Cateye’s EL series front lights are crap – been there, done that. Fenix LD20 w/2xAA is an improvement but the velcro bar mount isn’t as good as a proper bracket. Do you have to restrict it to AAs? Lezyne Mini/Power Drive XL? Li-Ion, USB charging (which I think is more convenient).

    robdeanhove
    Member

    OK, Revo/RedEye it is then

    A wise choice 😉 Enjoy!

    robdeanhove
    Member

    Would also consider getting the Shutter Precision dynamo laced onto a light rim for the road bike to double up the value of the Revo

    I have done exactly this! PD-8 on No-Tubes Crest on the MTB and PV-8 on Mavic Open Pro for the road bike. I’m a very happy chappy about this.

    trail_rat
    Member

    Does the cable come out the back of the revo ? for instance i stopped at the purveyor of foodstuffs on my way home and wanted to keep my expensive light in my pocket , but not unwind the cable from the fork etc and spend ages faffing putting it back together ?

    drlex
    Member

    […] PV-8 on Mavic Open Pro for the road bike. I’m a very happy chappy about this.

    Noted and thank you; on the wish list for next year – until then, I have the Philips SafeRide 80 & Moon Shield for the rare dry winter commute on the “plastic fantastic” road bike, so not under-lit.

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