Choosing a wood burner

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  • Choosing a wood burner
  • b r
    Member

    as with anything, get 2-3 quotes

    winston
    Member

    You know your neighbourhood is middleclass when the doorstep salesmen are selling woodburners!

    Do you get cold called by Aga?

    soops
    Member

    Clearview stoves are fantastic woodburners!

    Premier Icon pedroball
    Subscriber

    We got a Stovax one, which is great – came to about £850ish. The Scandinavian ones tend to kick out more heat than their output suggests but the style is different. If it’s >5kw you will probably need a vent in the room.

    The lining part inc fitting the stove etc was about the same again as the stove.

    The stovax one lights really easily, is super adjustable and reviews are good…

    Premier Icon cb
    Subscriber

    Good timing as they tend to be less busy and more flexible on pricing about now. As above get at least 3 quotes and be comfortable with the guy you use – ask for recommendations etc

    BillMC
    Member

    Sorry, to clarify, this was not a random call. We had asked them to come out. On a more personal level, being described as middle class would tempt me to reach for the whisky bottle and the revolver.

    sharkbait
    Member

    Regardless of the cost of works, I can highly recommend Clearview stoves, indeed we have two of them!

    *other stoves are available*

    twinw4ll
    Member

    Contura 51L best 5kw woodburner on the market.
    I used to own a Clearview.

    geologist
    Member

    We have just been through the same dilemma.

    On the advice of a friend who is a retained firefighter, and a fire fitter, we went for a burley. He said clearview were good, but the Burleys were slightly more effecient. Both are the same price ish.

    Clearviews technology seems to have been the same for last few years, they are good, but not quite as ‘uptodate’ as others, Burley being one. that is why they are starting to lag behind the others in output effeciency.

    globalti
    Member

    Crikey! How can one cast-iron box containing a fire be more technologically advanced than another? Most of it is down to the quality of the fuel and the user’s understanding of the air feed arrangements and combustion temperatures.

    Best advice we were given when we chose our multi-fuel was always to err on the side of a smaller stove, which you will be burning hotter and therefore cleaner. Nothing looks worse than an oversize stove shut down, smoldering and smoking up the glass.

    Having used wood only stoves and multi-fuel stoves I would always go for the latter because of the wider choice of fuels and the ease of creating that vital bed of smokeless embers, on which to burn your nice big seasoned logs.

    b r
    Member

    On a more personal level, being described as middle class would tempt me to reach for the whisky bottle and the revolver.

    Upper class then, as the rest of them would say ‘gun’. 🙂

    BillMC
    Member

    Apologies for this topic having been much visited on here. Just had a salesman round offering a 5W Clearview wood burner, not the cheapest but he claims more adjustable and refined than the competition. I have no experience in this area so any observations or comments would be most welcome. We’ve asked him to quote for knocking out the fireplace, lining the chimney, installing the burner and sticking a cowl on the chimneytop. Anyone who’s had similar work, how much did it cost? Any firms you would recommend? I’m in Rutland.

    mrmonkfinger
    Member

    I think you’ll find the nomenclature employed by the street youths is “shooter”.

    winston
    Member

    Its Shootah

    and the the op has the wrong forum initials if he is class concious!

    Premier Icon geoffj
    Subscriber

    Steer clear of the eBay specials and choose one you think looks the best and is within your budget – but avoid a Hunter Hawk!

    We’ve had 3 stoves here are currently on one with a back boiler. We were in Wales a couple of weeks ago and the cottage had Morso Squirrel in which I was mightily impressed with. Worth a look at the 5k end of the market.

    sharkbait
    Member

    Contura 51L best 5kw woodburner on the market.
    I used to own a Clearview.

    TW – I’ve read this also and I’m looking to fit one in another property (clearview wouldn’t look modern enough) – is the 51L a multifuel or wood only?

    crankboy
    Member

    Round our way it’s a strap not a shooter. Clearview are very good I have a morso squirrel which I like but a friend has a clearview which looks good and burns well in his bigger room.

    Price wise purchase lininning knocking out fitting and new hearthstone came in just under 2k about 5 years ago.

    JohnB
    Member

    Stovax Stockton 3 multi fuel here in the living room, pretty much heated the whole 3 bed semi all winter, burning 24 hours a day.

    Stove £420
    Liner £380 (10 metres of top grade stainless)
    Adapters, cowel, stove pipe, plate, clamps etc £200
    BC sign off £240 (first one they had done in Warwickshire….)
    Materials for hearth £100
    Leca back fill £160

    I did the work myself last Nov.

    One top tip is to try to get the liner to rest against the chimney breast in the upstairs room then the breast gets nice and warm and heats upstairs too.

    Premier Icon allfankledup
    Subscriber

    Had a clearview fitted a while back

    Old gas fire removed, fireplace cleared, hearth rebuilt, fire surround plastered, carpet trimmed
    Clearview and 14m of liner installed

    I think it came in as 2k – but a lot of that was stove

    We had to find a mantelpiece for ourselves – Fairlie furniture did us proud.

    Mugboo
    Member

    Contura 51l here, wood only Sharkbait but I haven’t found that a problem. We had a Stovax multifuel in the last house and after our first winter using the Contura, I’m more than happy with my choice.

    I could be wrong but I’m sure we use less wood than we used to when we mixed a bit of smokeless & wood. On the Stovax it seemed to need the coals to keep the fire in. Once the Contura is rocking it stays in for ages. The Stovax had a liner, the Contura doesn’t.

    samuri
    Member

    stovax 5kw here. Don’t know how it compares to others but I’m very happy with it. Kicks out masses of heat, can be turned down easily enough. easy to clean, looks like a stove.

    winston
    Member

    Charnwood C4 and total reneovation of fireplace plus granite hearth, liner,oak mantle etc cost us 2.5k last year. I think we paid a little too much but it was just before xmas so that was what the market would bear

    Not sure about the Charnwood – burns well and looks nice but not as controlable as our squirrel that we had in our old house

    Premier Icon matthewjb
    Subscriber

    No idea about the Clearview.

    Fitting our Morso cost about £1500 including plastering etc.

    ski
    Member

    Regarding the fitter, I would also ask for references from past work, HETAS registered? Etc.

    redstripe
    Member

    +1 for Burley woodburners

    Premier Icon granny_ring
    Subscriber

    My guess is that would cost you around £2.5k +

    Premier Icon chorlton
    Subscriber

    A friend had a stove and liner fitted for about £1900. It was a fairly simple job without problems. It’s a Fireline 5kw and seems brilliant.

    I fitted my Aarrow Ecoburn 5 and liner this winter myself which needed me to put a concrete hearth in. Got it signed off by building control. Equally brilliant. £240 🙂

    Of course your time may be better spent than mixing concrete, wrestling with a razor sharp steel liner that wont budge whilst on a roof ladder. (There’s a reason fitters insist on scaffold.)

    Anyone thinking about doing it yourself and like a challenge then as long as you research it then do it.
    All the help you need here

    Another Charnwood user here.

    Bought stove for £800 and spent £600 on materials for fitting.

    The problem with asking others on quotes its a completely rough figure as houses vary so much. It would be worth while asking a few people who possibly live on the same street as you/have same build of house what they have done.

    The more adjustable a stove is the better. Some cheaper stoves have pretty much an on/off in terms of air flow and struggle to keep the fire in overnight/longer periods or burn fuel at a rapid rate.

    Also add into your cost log storage. The more you can store for longer and dryer the easier and cheaper it will be to run the stove. Or if your looking at coal, look at what other options you coal supplier offers, I’m currently using what our chap refers to as “Marbles” through the night to keep the warmth in and they are doing an excellent job.

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