Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 15 total)
  • Chains for sheds
  • jamiemcf
    Full Member

    Here’s a security question.

    We have 4 bikes in the shed. i’ve been looking into security for them. I’ve been looking at the pragmasis chains and a double doofer.

    Unfortunatly it’d have to be secured to the slabs below the shed (i was thinking of sliding another slab under the shed to increase the anchor depth, far from ideal i know, but short of emptying the shed and moving it to dig in an anchor it’s the best i can think of just now).

    Does anyone have experience of the larger chains 16mm/19mm. While the bikes are insured, I’d rather not have the hassle, a few hundred quid spent now seems like a worthwhile investment.

    Any other suggestions folks?

    Jamie

    muppetWrangler
    Free Member

    I have a 2.5m long 19mm diameter chain (almax series 4) looped through 4 bikes and a steel post. I’m not entirely sure what your question is but I’ve nothing negative to say about the chain other than it is very heavy (obviously) which means being a bit careful when handling it near thin walled bike frames.

    Also there’s no need to move the shed in order to make a secure anchor point. Cut an appropriate sized hole in the floor of the shed. Then dig down 30-40cm, suspend your anchor point at an appropriate height and fill the hole up to the level of the original shed floor with concrete and any bits of decent sized steel you can find as home made reinforcement. Your shed floor is still level and you have a secure and discreet anchor point.

    Leku
    Free Member

    A good way of making an anchor point is to get an old car tyre and fill it with concrete (reinforced with chicken wire). Once set it can be rolled into place. The rubber tyre means it can’t be broken up with a sledge hammer.

    marka.
    Free Member

    I use the Pragmasis 16mm chain + shed shackle. The shed shackle isn’t going to be as good as a proper ground anchor, but it was a hell of a lot easier to install.

    The 16mm chain is already pretty beefy. I’d be reluctant to go above that, partly because of the weight (it’s easy to drop the end and take a chunk out of the paintwork) and because it’s tricky to manhandle through multiple bike frames (and even harder through spokes).

    cruzcampo
    Free Member

    Did something similar at my first two houses…

    Put a transit disc brake under the shed, bolted the chain to it, (used some rectangle washers in the end) and chucked over some concrete, it was never tested out though..

    Beefed up the next version of it a little at my previous place, new owners haven’t told me if its ever been tested though..

    Pragmasis 16mm Protector…

    Ground anchor with hammered in ball bearings

    Chucked concrete over the lot

    Raised it a further inch

    Added a steel plate to top it off and superglue in the screw heads, although if they did get the plate up its not going very far as it would hit the bike, just stops access to the anchor.

    These were all finished off with a wireless dialler in the main house which would ring several numbers should the shed get breached.

    Junkyard
    Free Member

    personally a pro wuld saw through your frame and sell the bits so anything is more for visual effect than being impenetrable

    I would personally use a lot of beefy chains rather than one massive chain

    cruzcampo
    Free Member

    @junkyard but a ground anchor is at least a minimum to stop them simply carrying the bike out. Chaining the whole lot to another few bikes makes going through every frame more awkward.

    Junkyard
    Free Member

    Of course but I also used to lock forks to forks with D locks through the crown/stanchion bit etc
    All you can do is slow them down and annoy them

    you can do this with a beefy lock and ground anchor [ and I did] but i also used a number of other locks to lock wheels together etc

    cruzcampo
    Free Member

    Fork to fork never thought of that +1 😆

    carlos
    Free Member

    Also there’s no need to move the shed in order to make a secure anchor point. Cut an appropriate sized hole in the floor of the shed. Then dig down 30-40cm, suspend your anchor point at an appropriate height and fill the hole up to the level of the original shed floor with concrete and any bits of decent sized steel you can find as home made reinforcement. Your shed floor is still level and you have a secure and discreet anchor point.

    Did exactly this at the last house, took a couple of hrs to prep, (don’t forget to screw a shutter piece between the bare earth and the shed floor or you’ll use way more concrete than you actually need) 1x decent conc mix and then I just screwed the anchor to it. Took the BIL longer to remove the anchor when we moved than it did installing the lot

    cruzcampo
    Free Member

    Should have left it Carlos! 😆

    Basil
    Full Member

    +1 for cutting through frame.
    We were left with a small pile of carbon dust and scum just sold the parts which are untracable.
    moan moan!
    Shed security for us uses a wireless alarm with phone ringer.

    carlos
    Free Member

    cruzcampo – Member
    Should have left it Carlos!

    It kept him busy and out of the way

    riddoch
    Full Member

    Im interested in the wireless alarm and phone ringer now. Was that an off the shelf kit?

    jamiemcf
    Full Member

    Thanks for all the info and suggestions. I’ll have a look into alarms for the door as well. I opeted for a 16mm chain. The 19 seemed a bit over the top and maybe too cumbersome. If they want it bad enough they’ll still get it but I’d hope to slow them down in the meantime.

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