Cervical traction at home ..anyone tried the different options pump/weights/diy

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  • Cervical traction at home ..anyone tried the different options pump/weights/diy
  • kaiser
    Member

    started to stretch my giraffe neck at home because of various pains which seem to emanate from that area . I’m using the folded towel round the back of the head attached to a bungy tied to a door handle whilst lying down and it works quite well but just wondered if anyone had tried the other relatively inexpensive versions such as the pump up neck collar ( loads of china cheapies available) or the door kit using a weighted back /pulley and neck harness?
    Quite like the pump up idea for convenience but wonder if it really does work ok.
    be interested in your experiences
    thanks in advance
    Bill

    qwerty
    Member

    Sounds risky. Personally I’d seek the professional advice of a gynecologist first.

    Michael Hutchence?

    Is that you?

    stumpy01
    Member

    Cervical

    Or am I missing something?

    Premier Icon slowoldman
    Subscriber

    I found myself agreeing with qwerty until I Googled it. There seems to be loads of self help and fancy bits of hardware so I’m sure you’ll be fine just hanging heavy weights on your neck as long as you follow the Youtube videos.

    Though I think I’d consult a GP or physio – just to be on the safe side.

    Premier Icon jam bo
    Subscriber

    ^^^

    Off topic completely. But I realised the other day that is saul from homeland.

    kaiser
    Member

    already asked chiro + loads do it regularly with good results[video]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=v8xRxSNZkBY[/video]

    DrP
    Member

    FYI y’all….
    C is for cervix.
    Cervix means neck..
    “Neck of head”
    “Neck of womb”

    Also, C is for cookie

    DrP

    tjagain
    Member

    Kaiser – you asked a chiropractor? a proven snake oil salesman? Someone with no proper medical knowledge and who works in a profession with no evidence of any benefit from their treatments but plenty of evidence of harm

    don’t do it

    Premier Icon wwaswas
    Subscriber

    what tj said.

    jimbobo
    Member

    SOwhat happens when a clinician goes to a chiropractor and gets good outcomes? Does the evidence base swallow itself into an ever lasting loop?

    Premier Icon joat
    Subscriber

    with no evidence of any benefit from their treatments but plenty of evidence of harm

    Oh no, hang on…
    Sorry different topic.

    Premier Icon wwaswas
    Subscriber

    SOwhat happens when a clinician goes to a chiropractor and gets good outcomes? Does the evidence base swallow itself into an ever lasting loop?

    I think that’s getting back to ‘one person’s experience isn’t evidence’ argument isn’t it?

    kaiser
    Member

    My chiropractor definately knows his stuff and doesn’t suggest multiple visits when unnecessary ,in fact one time didn’t charge me because he couldn’t get the movement needed in my thoracic spine (due to muscle tension ) to loosen up my chronically stiff upper back. neither physios or osteo have helped as much to relieve the pain i feel.
    Re NO evidence ..my personal experience is all the evidence i need and if it didn’t help i wouldn’t use it.

    tjagain
    Member

    jimbobo – Member

    SOwhat happens when a clinician goes to a chiropractor and gets good outcomes? Does the evidence base swallow itself into an ever lasting loop?

    anecdote is not evidence

    there was a lot of research into chiros and evidence for effectiveness due to a libel claim from the chiropractors association against a medic. The chiropractors lost. there is no evidence of any benefit from chiropractic whatsoever but there is evidence of harm

    allthegear
    Member

    Enough evidence for it to be added to NHS treatment in Wales…

    Rachel

    shermer75
    Member

    Same word, pronounced differently to avoid confusion:

    Serv-eye-cle: just below the head

    Serv-ickle: just below the uterus

    tjagain
    Member

    allthe gear – chiropractic or spinal manipulation in general?

    There is zero evidence of any benefit from chiropractic. Zero. there is slight evidence but far from conclusive for osteopathy and spinal manipulation from Physios

    Premier Icon vondally
    Subscriber

    What is the cause of root of the neck problem? Do you have herniated disc? Muscle imbalances creating pain? Back or hip problems? What is your walking like?

    The neck bizzarely is often affected by other skeletal issues massively, so it is worth getting another opinion rather than self medicating/ manipulation.

    I am no fan of chiropractic s having tried a good few but i am a big fan of osteopath if you get a good one.

    Superficial
    Member

    Same word, pronounced differently to avoid confusion:

    Serv-eye-cle: just below the head

    Serv-ickle: just below the uterus

    Yes, this is something I have noticed too. I’m not sure if there’s an official basis for it (the entomology* is identical so I would guess not) but the difference can be used to troll other doctors. Eg please examine this lady with serv-ickle pain.

    *Sic

    Premier Icon ampthill
    Subscriber

    Kaiser – you asked a chiropractor? a proven snake oil salesman? Someone with no proper medical knowledge and who works in a profession with no evidence of any benefit from their treatments but plenty of evidence of harm

    This seems a bit more balanced

    http://www.nhs.uk/conditions/chiropractic/Pages/Introduction.aspx

    There is evidence that they can treat things like back pain. But no alternative therapy, including chiropractic manipulation is more effective than the conventional alternative

    Will quoting a paper help

    http://www.thespinejournalonline.com/article/S1529-9430(03)00177-3/abstract?cc=y=

    PS I’m no fan alternative therapies. But all medical practice needs evaluating to the same standards. Anecdotal evidence either way is of no help

    tjagain
    Member

    And conventional treatment is painkillers and wait.

    From your link
    “here is some, mostly poor-quality, evidence that spinal manipulation is an effective treatment for some other musculoskeletal conditions involving the bones, joints and soft tissue. The evidence on manual therapy, including spinal manipulation, is not strong enough in these cases to form the basis of a recommendation to use the treatment.”

    Inb other words it utter bollocks without the shred of an evidence base

    Premier Icon ampthill
    Subscriber

    tj although that is a quote its not the bit I was referring to

    There is good evidence that manual therapy which may include spinal manipulation – as practised by chiropractors – can be an effective treatment for persistent lower back pain.

    Here is a paper with some low grade evidence

    I’m repeating myself as I edited it into my earlier post

    http://www.thespinejournalonline.com/article/S1529-9430(03)00177-3/abstract?cc=y=

    So I can’t agree with the statement “zero evidence for chiropratic manipulation as a treatment for lower back pain”

    I’ll say again. I’m skeptical about alternative medicine (puting it mildly). But we must use the same standards for all medicine

    tjagain
    Member

    Zero evidence that meets even the basic standards for healthcare treatment. Zero real evidence

    thats right – we should use the same standards and if we did chiropractic would be banned as dangerous and a sham.

    The spine journal – a fake pseudo medical journal. Read the 2011 cochrane review

    Not one properly constructed study has ever found any significant benefit whereas its a fact many people have been damaged by chiropractic

    Premier Icon ampthill
    Subscriber

    double post

    Premier Icon ampthill
    Subscriber

    Ok I checked at the Cochrane review, well the abstract. It says what I thought it would. It’s not better than anything else. Not the same as no affect

    Combined chiropractic interventions slightly improved pain and disability in the short-term and pain in the medium-term for acute and subacute LBP. However, there is currently no evidence that supports or refutes that these interventions provide a clinically meaningful difference for pain or disability in people with LBP when compared to other interventions. Future research is very likely to change the estimate of effect and our confidence in the results.

    tjagain
    Member

    ampthill – you understand the language that medical research is written in?

    That basically saying its nonsense and we cannot prove it now but will in the future

    the review is of 12 randomised studies only 3 of which are at low risk of bias – again translates as the evidence is rubbish

    Chiropractic does no good and often cause damage

    Phrenic nerve injury: a rare but serious complication of chiropractic neck manipulation

    https://www.quackwatch.org/01QuackeryRelatedTopics/chiroeval.html

    https://www.theguardian.com/lifeandstyle/2012/may/14/dangers-chiropractic-treatment-under-reported

    kaiser
    Member

    TJ sorry but you are talking nonsense by saying chiropractic does NO good. It has helped me immensely and not by placebo effect but by reducing pressure on irritated spinal nerves.

    Premier Icon ampthill
    Subscriber

    TJ I’ll read the links later

    I enjoy a good debate. No personal, comments good stuff

    docrobster
    Member

    I had a patient who had his vertebral artery ripped off by a chiropractor manipulating his neck one time too many.
    But that’s just an anecdote, not evidence. So I don’t think it will happen every time someone sees a chiropractor

    tjagain
    Member

    kaiser – Member

    TJ sorry but you are talking nonsense by saying chiropractic does NO good. It has helped me immensely and not by placebo effect but by reducing pressure on irritated spinal nerves.

    Nopoe – anecdote is not evidence and chiropractic does not reduce the time the pain takes to settle. You get back pain. you have two weeks worth of chiropractic intervention and the pain gets better so you think the chiropractic has worked. Actually the pain would have got better in the same timescale if you had done nothing.

    Its a complete con and a dangerous one

    Van Halen
    Member

    I like my chiro. Not necessarily for the manipulation but certainly as we discuss how to best stretch the hurty bit and get some movement. Sitting on yer arse waiting is never good.

    It’s bollox but then I don’t really trust anyone. Especially doctors paid to prescribe stuff.

    It would be interesting to know documented percentages for dangerous outcomes from doctors and chiropractic compared.

    You pays yer money…

    Premier Icon peteimpreza
    Subscriber

    Well said tj , please listen to,him guys and girls .

    alric
    Member

    i had/have a neck problem whichnothing seemed to help. It was from riding bikes
    One day there was a physiotherapist from NZ, who just moved my neck around for a minute, and the problem was gone.
    It was fine for months, until I fell off again. By this time the physio had left town.
    Again, in Thailand, I went to see a thai @practitioner. He did the same, twisted my neck for a minute, and it all clicked back into place.
    Its about time I went to see him again

    slackalice
    Member

    Whatever approach or methodology an individual finds benefit from is their’s to choose. We make our own world, with our own beliefs and we can all be different.

    Having experienced chiro, osteo and physio over a number of years, my symptoms never went away completely. Using a fit ball daily helped me massively with both lower and upper back issues.

    That was 10 years ago.

    Go holistic OP. Look and consider the possible metaphysical causes and make a choice, carry on as you are or deal with them.

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