Career change – any advice?

Home Forum Chat Forum Career change – any advice?

Viewing 40 posts - 1 through 40 (of 43 total)
  • Career change – any advice?
  • You are only 23…

    At 23, and considering you’ve been at Uni, how long have you actually been in a career for that you’re considering making a change from?!!!

    alexxx
    Member

    My advice? if you don’t have a particular career you know you want to follow… get a van converted and go travelling and find out what really switches you on. Be more creative than just going into a line of work you think you’ll like… go scare yourself, try some new experiences and learn from it all. You’ll stumble on what you want one day – no point rushing it if you’re not concerned about cash!

    Why not stick with how things are now and make hay while the sun shines, etc. Stash some money aside and then follow your dreams later (which will undoubtedly change). At 23, time is on your side so don’t rush things for the sake of it.

    TheBrick
    Member

    Try and get any job in the building trade and make contacts. It is never too late to change jobs but the older you are the harder it gets so try it now while it is easy. Don’t get put off by a few knock backs.

    TheBrick
    Member

    P.s. if you want to do the official route then aprenteships get much tougher to come by post 25. It is still not too late if you wait until post 25 but you will have to go a roll your own apprentice route.

    Premier Icon njee20
    Subscriber

    First posts on here get more and more random.

    Premier Icon Cougar
    Subscriber

    Professional photographer? Piece of piss apparently.

    if you want to do the official route then aprenteships get much tougher to come by post 25. It is still not too late if you wait until post 25 but you will have to go a roll your own apprentice route.

    Assuming you’re not a dirty spammer laying groundwork, I’m going to be looking for apprentice network engineers shortly. Dunno about the Uni side of things but I’d have no qualms about taking on an older recruit.

    aw126
    Member

    GlennQuagmire

    agreed, i should have said change Career path. Under no delusion that i’ve had any kind of ‘career’ to be giving up at this stage! Thanks for the feedback- It just feels a bit wrong to stay in a company that is big on progression, when deep down you don’t buy into it and don’t see a future for your self there.

    Alexx, your probably right. I studied Art at college – love painting ect, but decided i didn’t know where that was taking me…

    TheBrick
    Member

    Assuming you’re not a dirty spammer laying groundwork, I’m going to be looking for apprentice network engineers shortly. Dunno about the Uni side of things but I’d have no qualms about taking on an older recruit.

    Well I do like spam and am about to go for a shower…

    I am referring to gov help for firms. I looked into doing an aprenteships about 3 years ago but being over 25 the firm I spoke to said that it was harder for them to take me on as I was older and would require full minimum wage rather than aprenteships wadges.

    aw126
    Member

    Hi everyone, I’m after a bit of career advice if that’s ok.
    Just to give a bit of background, I’m 23 years old with a business Studies degree and currently living in Northwest (Preston).

    After Uni I worked at my local Council in an admin type role for 1 year 3 Months. It wasn’t my dream job or anything but I felt useful and got some good feedback. Anyhow an opportunity came up to move half way down the country, working as an Estimator for a contractor on a RAF base. It’s been a steep learning curve and it’s made me rethink what I want to do with the rest of my life in terms of a career. It pays well ect but I think the below saying sums up my thoughts “It’s better to be at the bottom of a ladder you want to climb, than halfway up one you don’t”.

    I’ve been thinking a lot lately about doing a more hands on job (Construction / joinery / Carpentry ect). I really like the idea of being able to complete something tangible and look back at my work at the end of day and see that I’ve achieved something. I’ll be honest, the only practical experience I’ve had was woodwork at GSCE level. I’m sure you’ll agree with me when I say this won’t be any use to me when trying to switch careers…
    I was wondering if anyone had any advice for me when it comes to completely switching my careers path?

    I’m aware of the fact that in making this transition I would be looking a minimum wage or less if I secured an apprenticeship, and it might take me a good 5 years + to be making the same money as I’m on now (£24K) but I’ve learned that money is not something I’m concerned about (I have no dependants) I’d prefer to be doing something that’s interests me / I enjoy.
    Any advice in terms of best places for courses, would be much appreciated. Also if anyone has heard of anyone else making a transition from office work to a more Practical based job please let me know. I know that securing an apprenticeship would be difficult given that Its cheaper and more cost effective to employee younger people.

    Feel free to be a blunt as you like – I’m conscious that I really don’t have a clue about this industry and what it actually entails so I might be looking at it with rose tinted classes ect (Grass is always greener ect) – but I want to give it a go and see if I have any potential while I’m still relatively young.
    Thank in advance!

    aw126
    Member

    The Brick, thanks for advice. I guess making the leap is the first step but i suspect people will be a bit dubious of my intentions given my unrelated background. I’ll keep in mind the apprenticeship expiry date.

    njee20 – very true. I’ll be honest i joined this forum after looking searching in google about people changing careers and a few people had posted stuff on here on the topic, and the answers seemed quite supportive and constructive.

    Cougar – good to here I wouldn’t be completely shunned at application / interview just for my age! Guess i’d need to do a bit more experimenting regarding which industry i’d like to go into – don’t want to get into the habit of starting a job and leaving within the first year. You’ve got me googling when a network engineer does!

    hammerite
    Member

    Stay where you are for a bit and stash the cash (assuming wherever you live is relatively cheap!). Build up some savings. Make a career move in a while when you might be more sure what exactly you want to. Do some building type work at home if you can, offer to help mates who might be doing some work on their houses, maybe do a bit of work experience during your annual leave etc…

    shermer75
    Member

    My advice? if you don’t have a particular career you know you want to follow… get a van converted and go travelling and find out what really switches you on

    Best advice ever!!! 🙂

    hammerite
    Member

    My advice? if you don’t have a particular career you know you want to follow… get a van converted and go travelling and find out what really switches you on
    Best advice ever!!!

    Actually it’s what I’d do if I was 23. Or if not doing the van get a round the world plane or an interrail ticket.

    poolman
    Member

    My uncle was a carpenter all his life and lived near Preston. He was always busy and never advertised, it was all word of mouth and all the builders used him.

    He mainly did windows but made loads of bespoke furniture, I just gave him a plan and he made it, shelves, doors, windows etc. Latterly as wood prices increased his jobs were more expensive, at first he was less than pvc but as pvc windows became more commonplace wooden windows became more expensive.

    Anyway, they still sold as pvc looks awful in old houses. The workshop is still there and his old partner took it over, still ticking over.

    I was actually tempted at one stage to take it over but as he did it all his life he made it look easy.

    Good luck anyway, don’t let being in Preston put you off, if you are good people will find you.

    hamishthecat
    Member

    There are some massive construction projects coming up which the uk industry will struggle to service, e.g. HS2, Hinkley Point C, Sizewell C and Moorside new nuclear. Getting into a skilled construction role could be very valuable.

    Premier Icon Cougar
    Subscriber

    the firm I spoke to said that it was harder for them to take me on as I was older and would require full minimum wage rather than aprenteships wadges.

    Ah, I see where you’re coming from. We heavily overpay school-leaver age apprentices, but it catches up and defaults to minimum wage as they get older.

    good to here I wouldn’t be completely shunned at application / interview just for my age!

    Your spelling on the other hand, I’d kick you to the kerb for. (-:

    You’ve got me googling when a network engineer does!

    At an initial apprentice level, it’s copying and pasting and putting things in boxes. Eventually you’d be configuring routers and switches from scratch.

    The skills you need to bring to the table for me would be attitude / enthusiasm first and foremost, if you don’t want to be here I can’t work with that. Are you the sort of person who gets excited about new tech? A close second would be a logical mind. Beyond that, an ability to add up and string a sentence together.

    This isn’t necessarily a job offer (-: Just throwing out what I’d be looking for in an apprentice, in case it helps. Whether I’m typical, I don’t know (I expect that I’m fairly unconventional).

    You’ll never find your passion doing something you’re not passionate about. Go live a little, grab a van like said, or take an apprenticeship in an other feild, or something else entirely that exposes you to new things.

    Whilst sensible to say you should save, if you have no commitments then you might be waiting a while for a better time.

    Life’s short, find something you love. If it’s money you love, then fine, stay climb the ladder. If that is the only reason you are staying, and money is not what drives you then you already know what to do but want someone to tell you.

    If there is nothing stopping you doing something different, stop looking for permission

    Premier Icon wallop
    Subscriber

    I work in preconstruction – I’m interested to hear what you do like and what you don’t like about being an estimator. It can lead on to other – more exciting 😆 – things.

    But why rush for a change? You seem to have a good job, decent money, put some money aside while you think about the future. Get yourself established in your trade before making a break for the border. But keep that break a commitment!

    Premier Icon Nobeerinthefridge
    Subscriber

    Chimney sweep. Seriously. Advertise as specialising in wood burning flue liners, it’s a 3 month wait round here, God knows what it’s like darn sarf.

    aw126
    Member

    (Stay where you are for a bit and stash the cash (assuming wherever you live is relatively cheap!). Build up some savings. Make a career move in a while when you might be more sure what exactly you want to)

    probably the sensible option, only i’m not really saving anything at the moment as living by myself. But yep i don’t think rushing into something for the sake of it is a good idea.

    aw126
    Member

    There are some massive construction projects coming up which the uk industry will struggle to service, e.g. HS2, Hinkley Point C, Sizewell C and Moorside new nuclear. Getting into a skilled construction role could be very valuable.

    good point – might be sensible for me to do some research in the growth sectors while i’m deciding

    FWIW, my son (31) did a degree in textile & knitwear design & now works for Transport for London in a safety & contingency planning area. On around 50K
    My stepson (27) has a degree/masters in business & economics, he’s now a train driver with freightliner. On around 42K

    HTH.

    aw126
    Member

    The skills you need to bring to the table for me would be attitude / enthusiasm first and foremost, if you don’t want to be here I can’t work with that. Are you the sort of person who gets excited about new tech? A close second would be a logical mind. Beyond that, an ability to add up and string a sentence together.

    This isn’t necessarily a job offer (-: Just throwing out what I’d be looking for in an apprentice, in case it helps. Whether I’m typical, I don’t know (I expect that I’m fairly unconventional).

    thanks for the advice, i didn’t take it as an offer 🙂 but its useful to understand what people look for beyond experience. Sounds like i need to find something that i’m interested in – do some research and demonstrate genuine enthusiasm at interview

    Prison service? Up to 25K as a screw.

    Don’t even think about it. 😥

    aw126
    Member

    You’ll never find your passion doing something you’re not passionate about. Go live a little, grab a van like said, or take an apprenticeship in an other feild, or something else entirely that exposes you to new things.

    Whilst sensible to say you should save, if you have no commitments then you might be waiting a while for a better time.

    Life’s short, find something you love. If it’s money you love, then fine, stay climb the ladder. If that is the only reason you are staying, and money is not what drives you then you already know what to do but want someone to tell you.

    If there is nothing stopping you doing something different, stop looking for permission

    blunt but true haha. I like the idea but to be honest its a little daunting! I guess i need to find a balance, ie not staying in my current job too long but also not jumping ship with literally no plans haha. Thanks for your help

    aw126
    Member

    I work in preconstruction – I’m interested to hear what you do like and what you don’t like about being an estimator. It can lead on to other – more exciting – things.

    Hey, i quite like the number crunching side of it. Manipulating spreadsheets, using formulas, anaysing data ect, but i really dislike the contractual / legal aspects which is large majority of the job. Ironically i think having a construction / engineering background would be extremely useful in my current job and would make it alot less confusing / stressful. Its often a case where i have to present a bid to internal stakeholder where i personally don’t think i understand enough about the technical aspects. Your job sounds similar, what sort of tasks / projects do you get involved with in precon? I imagine having a construction background would be handy there?

    cheekyboy
    Member

    Learn to thatch young man !

    aw126
    Member

    FWIW, my son (31) did a degree in textile & knitwear design & now works for Transport for London in a safety & contingency planning area. On around 50K
    My stepson (27) has a degree/masters in business & economics, he’s now a train driver with freightliner. On around 42K

    HTH.

    Hey, thanks for your comment. Nice to know that we aren’t necessarily tied down to specific job as a result of what we study. Those examples are proof enough!
    Thanks

    aw126
    Member

    Learn to thatch young man !

    Haha, had a quick look on indeed.com No jobs are popping up 🙁 quite a small niche to get into i imagine! Although drinking cider on a roof in the middle of summer does sound like a nice job! Joking of course

    Premier Icon wallop
    Subscriber

    I’m surprised to hear the contractual side is so heavy for you. Is it civils you’re working on or general construction?

    I work for a main contractor as a bid manager. I started off as a QS but I’m not a huge fan of detail so moved into bid management, which is more about people. On every bid I’m working on I generally have a team of three: an estimator, a design manager and a planner. So I’ll deal with the contractual side of things more than the estimator – leaving them to crunch the numbers whilst I focus on risk and communications. It’s varied, unpredictable, exciting and I work for a great company. It makes me sad that as an industry we struggle to attract and retain young estimators. There’ll be none left soon (kerching!).

    Edit – I work in general construction and work on things like schools, hospitals, universities, civic buildings etc.

    aw126
    Member

    My uncle was a carpenter all his life and lived near Preston. He was always busy and never advertised, it was all word of mouth and all the builders used him.

    He mainly did windows but made loads of bespoke furniture, I just gave him a plan and he made it, shelves, doors, windows etc. Latterly as wood prices increased his jobs were more expensive, at first he was less than pvc but as pvc windows became more commonplace wooden windows became more expensive.

    Anyway, they still sold as pvc looks awful in old houses. The workshop is still there and his old partner took it over, still ticking over.

    I was actually tempted at one stage to take it over but as he did it all his life he made it look easy.

    Good luck anyway, don’t let being in Preston put you off, if you are good people will find you. thanks for encouragement. Nice to know that there is a market and therefore must be a few jobs going! Sounds like he was quite an expert – will take me a good 20 years to get there!

    alexxx
    Member

    Don’t get me wrong everyone is different but I do think stepping out of your comfort zone is what everyone should do a bit more of and I’m sure a lot of older guys wish they had done that when they had time on their side and no commitments.. If wading into the unknown isn’t for you… then what about some weekend skills courses such as a eco hut course in Wales or something along the lines of the hands on skill or lifestyle you maybe interested in? You’ll likely end up meeting a great group of people who will give you much better inspiration in real life and things will drop into place.

    i literally legged it to the French Alps at 25 and it worked out very well for my mind, friendships and career in a really strange way that no amount of research or logic would make sense of on paper.

    Have a go, live a bit – the older you get the more daunting and harder to change things up becomes. Your 20’s is for making mistakes and learning from them..

    Premier Icon Cougar
    Subscriber

    Sounds like i need to find something that i’m interested in

    I think this is the crux of it, yes.

    aw126
    Member

    I’m surprised to hear the contractual side is so heavy for you. Is it civils you’re working on or general construction?

    I work for a main contractor as a bid manager. I started off as a QS but I’m not a huge fan of detail so moved into bid management, which is more about people. On every bid I’m working on I generally have a team of three: an estimator, a design manager and a planner. So I’ll deal with the contractual side of things more than the estimator – leaving them to crunch the numbers whilst I focus on risk and communications. It’s varied, unpredictable, exciting and I work for a great company. It makes me sad that as an industry we struggle to attract and retain young estimators. There’ll be none left soon (kerching!).

    Edit – I work in general construction and work on things like schools, hospitals, universities, civic buildings etc.

    Hey, I work for a defence contractor on a RAF base so the work doesn’t really fit into either. Basically pricing up adhoc tasks / contracts which are over and above the baseline contract. At my level its more low value stuff, (<250K) work closely with projects but as an estimator we are required to draft / edit contractual documentation, proposal letters ect, and are also required to present the final bid to internal stakeholders prior to submission. Very much end to end in that respect. As a consequence i don’t feel like i’m building a good knowledge on once aspect. End up having a poor knowledge of everything haha. Interesting to hear your set up. I do think the work has the potential to be interesting but only if i had a good foundation of knowledge in the sector. In my case i’m often dependent on SME driven data, which i have limited capacity to challenge given my lack of knowledge. Not sure what its like in other sectors but i feel like its quite process heavy as well. Gathering signatures from many stakeholders before anything moves forward…

    allan23
    Member

    doing something that’s interests me / I enjoy

    This ^^^^^^^^^^^^^

    Although be aware that what you enjoy changes over time, so don’t worry too much and go for the opportunities when you can.

    I used to love IT. Now I don’t, quite like the tech side but sat at a desk in an office or sat in a car driving to another consultancy are probably two major negative lifestyle choices for health.

    I would love something a bit more outdoors and involving moving about but at late 40s it’s getting harder to change and keep a similar salary (not impossible though).

    If I could go back to 23 and do it again I don’t think I’d change much, but one thing I would do is save.

    Start saving what you can now.

    I suspect knowing others in their late 40s that pretty much everyone wakes up tired, fed up and looks at their pensions and bank balances and wishes they could retire or cut down the hours a bit.

    Premier Icon HansRey
    Subscriber

    Started out as a materials engineer working on materials modelling and characterisation. I now work in fashion, with models and some right characters.

    Whatever your transferable skills are, use those to help you decide your next step

    Premier Icon wallop
    Subscriber

    OP – where are you based at the moment?

Viewing 40 posts - 1 through 40 (of 43 total)

The topic ‘Career change – any advice?’ is closed to new replies.