Viewing 7 posts - 1 through 7 (of 7 total)
  • Canyon Roadlite 8.0 AL SL vs Roadlite CF 7.0
  • cooperidol
    Member

    Morning,

    Complete newbie and first time post here,

    I have recently got into cycling and have decided to upgrade. After a few weeks research I think I have decided on the Canyon Roadlite range of machines.

    What would you think is the best option between the light aluminium 8.0 AL SL at £1299 https://www.canyon.com/en-gb/hybrid-city/citybikes/roadlite/roadlite-al-sl-8.0/2345.html?dwvar_2345_pv_rahmenfarbe=BK

    And the carbon fibre CF 7.0 at £1499 https://www.canyon.com/en-gb/hybrid-city/citybikes/roadlite/roadlite-cf-7.0/1973.html?dwvar_1973_pv_rahmenfarbe=BK

    Would be great to hear your views on the pros and cons of aluminium v carbon fibre option here that are by and larger the main difference between the two.

    Thanks in advance

    Carbon will be quite a bit lighter. You can upgrade the components as they wear out and you’ll end up with a much lighter bike.

    cooperidol
    Member

    Thanks. I think the difference between the two bikes in weight is only 0.45 kg (8.8 v 9.25)
    Is that difference worth the cost differential or are there other factors in play?

    The alu one will probably have lighter components but a heavier frame. If you can I would get the carbon one.

    cooperidol
    Member

    Ok cool. I’ll research the components a bit. At a quick look I think they are virtually identical… but I may be wrong

    I suppose if they are and the frames are just 450g difference then is it really worth the extra cash. Is there any other positive negative pay offs with aluminium/carbon frames apart from weight?

    And also, something that’s always confused me is that it’s seems common practice to search for the lightest setup shaving grams off components where ever possible, but is that all negligible if you’re a couple of kilograms overweight? Or is it that not comparable? Eg. does a 1kg lighter bike show greater performance and efficiency benefits over the rider actually being 1kg lighter? (I know ideally you and the bike would be as light as you possible)…

    Premier Icon ampthill
    Subscriber

    weight?

    And also, something that’s always confused me is that it’s seems common practice to search for the lightest setup shaving grams off components where ever possible, but is that all negligible if you’re a couple of kilograms overweight?

    There is no simple answer.

    I would say 1kg is 1kg it matters not where it is. If you and the bike are 100kg reducing it to 99kg will get you up a hill 1% faster and make no difference in the flat.

    However that doesn’t stop some people really caring about how bikes feel. They like the slight extra acceleration of lighter wheels etc. It’s their money so why shouldn’t they.

    Time still tell which camp your in

    I can’t tell you which bike to buy. But if you’re really new to this are you sure you’ll only ride on the road and never go on over night trips? The bikes you link to are great for unloaded day rides. Other bike bikes will deal with luggage and rougher surfaces better. Thats not suggesting road bikes are bad just task specific

    I had an alu one and it’ll take 40mm tyres and a rack no problem so should be Ok for light touring or gentle off road etc.

Viewing 7 posts - 1 through 7 (of 7 total)

You must be logged in to reply to this topic.