Viewing 40 posts - 1 through 40 (of 69 total)
  • Can you jump?
  • nickc
    Full Member

    On your bike bike obviously. 🙂

    So not just jumping, but things like drop offs, stuff that has you in the air. Does it bother you if you can’t? Do you ever think that you’re not a “real” mountain biker if you can’t? Do you ever think; I should probs learn, but life gets in the way, are you completely unbothered; wheels on the ground, totally happy.

    I’m in the camp that I know I can do them both (badly) – I need to get my eye in with jumping, If I go somewhere like Revolution or BPW, by the end of the day I can jump pretty much all the things I want to, and then I don’t do it for months and months, and I forget, and have to re-learn over again. Drop-offs are no issue regardless. (unless they’re stuff like road gaps and then forget-about-it) lots of riding I do has them.

    Bazz
    Full Member

    My only mtb these days is a 100mm travel hardtail, I mostly ride road and gravel, and i’m terrified of getting hurt. I’ve long since abandoned any aspirations of hucking anything, im a 100% wheels on the ground rider, hell, I even prefer riding up hills to down!🤣

    ta11pau1
    Full Member

    Jumping, nope. Doesn’t bother me tbh, I rarely ride trails with proper jumps.

    Drops – I’m fine up to a certain height, maybe 3ft, above that my head takes over and I have to either push myself to do it or chicken out. Again, not a huge issue as I rarely ride trails with massive drops.

    docrobster
    Full Member

    Yeah but no but yeah but…
    I can fly off things if it doesn’t require any technique.
    I can’t actively “jump” like you need to be able to in order to clear some scary gaps.
    I’ve broken too many bones now I think, and I’m not flexible enough to make the bike do much. More of a hang in and hope situation really.

    tomhoward
    Full Member

    Using speed and sheer will? Yes.

    Using technique? Errm… Correct timing is my issue.

    Edit: seems I’m not the only one.

    crymble
    Full Member

    I’m a (fat, old,) white man. So answer is no.

    Wish I could though, I need to try to unlearn a lot of bad habits I think.

    K

    fazzini
    Full Member

    Jumping no – way too scared of getting hurt.
    Drop-offs – yep as long as not too scary or technical – straight lines etc.
    I’m more scared of big rock gardens and slabs tbh. I have a completely irrational fear of rocks…yet I love Laggan. Go figure haha

    Yak
    Full Member

    Small gaps, drops, friendly looking stuff.. yeah fine. Big stuff…nooooo. But I rarely go to anywhere with big stuff anyway, so no real issues.

    johnjn2000
    Full Member

    I am crap at jumping. I have had many coaching sessions where at the end of it I am clearing a gap or a table, and then 2 weeks later I find one on a trail and I am back to square 1. Drops are not so bad for me, I have got over the fear associated with anything up to around 3 foot with a decent landing area. Anything like that drop on GBU at FoD that you can see from the push up stills throws the fear at me. I know I can do it, my head just won’t let me and in some ways, yes, this does effect my riding enjoyment (not enough for it to be a problem though)

    reeksy
    Full Member

    Absolutely…

    … not as well as I thought I had when I watch it back on video.

    There’s a considerable lack of serious jumps where I live but lots of technical obstacles, skinnys, see saws and the likes. I’m ok at that stuff but a bit puckered throughout. Kids are now wanting to push things further and further so trying to help them and improve myself.

    droplinked
    Full Member

    Small jumps and drops, stuff you just fly off, aye no bother. Anything that requires skill or technique, not so much…

    Doesn’t bother me at all. Riding bikes is fun.

    Whilst I’d love to get better at jumping I just don’t have the time these days to go out and practice over and over. I’d much rather cover ground than session some jumps with the time I do manage to get out on the bike.

    w00dster
    Full Member

    Drops, with a straight simple lead in where speed overwrites technical skill, yep.
    Jumps…..nope. At least not on purpose and it never ends well!
    I do keep thinking about going on a jumps course, well, skills in general. But just don’t get to ride enough these days to make it worth it.

    JonEdwards
    Free Member

    Yes but, no but.

    I used to be half way reasonable. Rode Chicksands regularly, could hit most of the stuff in the Surrey Hills OK. Did some holidays in Whistler and sent some proper scary stuff.

    Then 10 years ago I moved to the Peaks. I’m a much better tech rider than I used to be, especially on stupid steep stuff, but have done very little jumping. More recently (lockdown) a lot of the newer cheeky trails are sprouting some pretty committing gaps in the middle of the steeps, and it’s properly annoying me that I can’t ride the entire trail clean. But now at the fat end of my 40s I’m a bit more circumspect about hitting the f***it button.

    Doesn’t help that I ride on my own 95% of the time, so unless I’m 100% sure I can do something out of the ordinary I tend to play it safe, plus there’s no one to follow in!

    5lab
    Full Member

    I’m fine on most stuff, but don’t really like large (>30′) high speed doubles as the consiquences of getting them wrong is just that much higher. Whistler is great for me as nearly all the trails are fairly low consiquence – the revised dirt merchant might have a couple of 20′ drops, but they’ve got big knuckles, long landing zones and its just a whole tonne of fun, compared to france where you have a needle-accurate landing with a shakey run-in.

    I’m also getting older (40) so don’t push things super hard these days, I got a dj bike a few years ago and don’t mind popping down to the dirt jumps near me (again, the speed is way lower so consiquences are managable), cant trick for s..t though

    Yak
    Full Member

    Doesn’t help that I ride on my own 95% of the time, so unless I’m 100% sure I can do something out of the ordinary I tend to play it safe, plus there’s no one to follow in!

    This too for me. If a new gap has appeared that looks a bit scary then I will have issues if there’s no one else to follow in. But if the gap allows me to jump off to the side first, then I will have a few goes to get the speed right then do it. If it’s commit or nothing, and I am on my own…then it’s usually a no-go.

    fossy
    Full Member

    No. As a ‘roadie’ by ‘trade’ nah. I’m not riding gnarly stuff enough. Drops I can just do, but nothing big at all. I injure myself enough on the road bikes, much to MrsF’s disgust.

    Wheels on ground for me, just don’t have the skill.

    tjagain
    Full Member

    Little ones yes sort of. Big jumps no way.

    mert
    Free Member

    There’s a photo somewhere in one of the mid/late 90’s mags of me about 5-6 foot in the air, looking cool AF going over a jump on my XC race bike, head down, arse up, narrow bars and 63 mm of elastomer sprung plushness. Think it might have been an NPS round.

    Reality is that i’d completely misjudged the approach (i was leading, which was unexpected), and the difference between pre ride and race pace had caught me unawares and i was completely out of control and expecting to die on impact. By complete fluke, i didn’t.

    I think i can count the number of times i’ve been properly airborne (over about 18″) since then on both hands.

    tthew
    Full Member

    A bit. Sensible size drops, and I actually think a decent edge is as important as a good run out.

    Tabletops, yes as there’s no consequence of coming up short. Small doubles/gaps, but only once I’ve had a look at them, rarely on sight.

    Similar to many of the above really. Hardtail bike doesn’t help improve my confidence as you get a little less forgiveness if you come up short or heavy.

    monkeyboyjc
    Full Member

    Jumping no, not really- I’ve been on jump technique days, regularly go to bike parks etc.  But no, I still am firmly in the can’t jump category.

    Drops I don’t have a problem with if they are up to a curtain height or a necessary trail feature. But again nothing with a gap I guess.

    Does it bother me? A little, hense the jump technique day, as i used to be able to up to my 20’s. But now, in my 40’s I seem to have lost what ever skill I had at jumps.

    rsl1
    Free Member

    I feel like I can jump with correct technique and will do anything up to the top end of beginner sized jumps, maybe a 3-4m table but have a real head game issue with the steep ramps of anything bigger. Like the jumps at the top of the FOD push up, I could do all but the last one. Same with popty ping at bpw. I’m not sure how to overcome this other than just going for it…

    Drops I’m on a good rate of progression and keen to find something I’m not willing to do…

    argee
    Full Member

    It’s all about the jump or drop, i enjoy the likes of empuru at windhill, but not that good on the top of GBU, i struggle to get the pace and just never full commit for some reason, it’s the same with drops, fast speed drops can be easier, but far worse if you fail, it’s really risk and reward for me, last 5 years i’ve really been more about enduro, BPW, etc, but i’m starting to back off this stuff, going for more mellow stuff like Dowies and so on in FoD that is fun, but less risk of a trip to A&E 😂

    dcwhite1984
    Free Member

    Yes i can, however i normally bottle it.

    Ive done a training day twice now, one public and one private 1-2-1 session, so I know I can do it, but i ride a lot on my own and dont hit big stuff very often so normally bottle it as my self preservation brain kicks in.

    nbt
    Full Member

    in honesty, no. At a trail center I MIGHT be tempted to “smash” it into a table top at what I think is an excessive speed, only to come up way too short and land on the flat. In the wild, nope. I might be tempetd to go over drops as long as they’re not huge – but then again I might not. I’m not proud of it but then again I’m not ashamed either, I know my own abilities. I probably COULD do it with coaching but whether I think i can be bothered? probalby not, I enjoy the riding I do right now cheers

    ta11pau1
    Full Member

    I’m sensing a theme here… This probably ties in quite well with the ‘how old are you’ survey question, given we’re a forum of mostly 30-60 year olds I’m not surprised at the avoidance of doing stuff that hurts when you crash! 😁

    VanHalen
    Full Member

    happy to jump. not massive proline stuff, but most regular trail features.

    but this is it for me: there is always tomorrow

    But now at the fat end of my 40s I’m a bit more circumspect about hitting the f***it button.!

    smokey_jo
    Full Member

    Nope, I’m fine on drops unless they’re stupid big but I’ve never been able to time a jump – not a single one, hardtail, full sus whatever just not happening, whenever I do get airborne as a result of speed and terrain my first instinct is to get the front down and have never been able to break the habit. This obviously means that any gap jump is a massive no.

    honourablegeorge
    Full Member

    I’m a crap jumper, but I think I know what I’m doing wrong. Which is bad, because I know I will hurt myself in the process of getting it right

    stingmered
    Full Member

    Yep, can do what I need to do. Yesterday racing down a (new to me) trail, rocky, techs, steepish but absolutely flat out, hit a blind crest and hucked a step down probably 8ft drop, 12 ft length over some rocks of death. I got more fazed by bike park doubles, but ok with anything up to 20ftish…

    Edit: I’m just about to hit 44 btw

    letmetalktomark
    Full Member

    The last time I attempted proper jumps it was going so well until it wasn’t.

    I ended up breaking my right hand, a full face helmet, gave myself a concussion and ended up with some fairly colourful abdominal bruising.

    I hit the deck so hard that despite wearing the full face helmet (that I broke) my cheekbone hit the floor.

    I basically looked like I had been fighting when we went to A&E – something I was literally pained to confirm I hadn’t been!

    Would I like to be able to confidently ride a 4X track – yes.

    Would I like to hit massive jumps – no.

    Am I building a 4X bike – of course. (Azonic Steelhead Pro ~2007)

    fatbrad
    Free Member

    I’m with Ta11pau1 here. I’m not overly comfortable with the wheels off the ground. I think it’s down to spending most of my MTB life on hardtails which I was happy with jumping on then moving to an FS bike it feels weird. Drops I’m OK with as long as I can scope it first and it’s not too big.

    razorrazoo
    Full Member

    Mid 40s here.  In more recent years I’ve been trying to push myself to do more drops and gaps, I feel my issue is more the mind games / bottle than lack of technique.  I’m much more inclined to send a much bigger drop which ‘could’ be rolled or a non-gap jump, than a smaller feature with more ‘consequence’ for not going full commitment.

    Riding with a group of mates who are all a similar level has pushed us on (ie if one does it then it encourages the rest to keep up).  Most recently I’ve spent time at Tunnel Hill. where there’s a variety of ‘gaps’ to be jumped.  I’m working my way through these at the moment which mostly require commitment at speed, ticked off another at the weekend which was a good feeling.

    I also find that riding at a bike park you can really build throughout a day as you get used to the speed. Several runs at a trail and all of a sudden features that you were coming up short on or bottling, you can get the speed and eye in and fully commit by the end of the day.  I find that having been to the Alps and spent more time at bike parks has helped with confidence committing at speed.

    sandboy
    Full Member

    As kids growing up we would build a ramp and get some mates to lay down behind the ramp which you would then jump over Evel Knievel style, on our Raleigh Grifters. As far as I can remember, no one ever got hurt and the record on our estate was 12 kids laying side by side!
    We then all got BMX’s in our early teens/80’s and raced them for a few years where you learned a lot of bike handling skills which for years I took for granted. Jumping was as much as being as fast and fluent as it was for the rush but it was a necessity for being fast.
    Now in my 50’s, living in the least hilly part of the country my wheels rarely leave the ground.

    sharkattack
    Full Member

    Can I jump?

    2010 Me- “Hell Yeah, I’ve been riding DH bikes for 10 years and I’ve just done a season in Whistler. Freight Train, Dirt Merchant, A-Line, clean runs, no brakes, sending it to the moon all day long.”

    2022 Me- “Well, if I stand up too quickly I’ll get dizzy and have to sit back down again. Also I have a mountain bike. It’s in the garage covered in dust.”

    ta11pau1
    Full Member

    Drops I’m OK with as long as I can scope it first and it’s not too big.

    Either this, or I find following a better rider fairly close and coming up to a drop that’s big but well within my abilities, my brain doesn’t have the time to compute and reactions take over and I just send it, never (touch wood) had any issues when doing this!

    At 41, there is definitely an element of self preservation too for me, tbh that’s not just on jumps and drops, it’s on steep/techy/exposed stuff too. I’m not afraid to walk stuff if I feel it’s not worth the risk.

    razorrazoo
    Full Member

    Either this, or I find following a better rider fairly close and coming up to a drop that’s big but well within my abilities, my brain doesn’t have the time to compute and reactions take over and I just send it, never (touch wood) had any issues when doing this!

    Ah, the tried and tested ‘there’s nothing too bad down this bit’, last in effect down the final section of Race Track at DYFI (made it down in one piece).

    weeksy
    Full Member

    Not really… i do drops better than i do jumps i guess… but i’m poor at both.

    Does it bother me…. massively yes. But i think i’d needs days and days of coaching to get better at both and i have time, but don’t really have the finances for it.

    sirromj
    Free Member

    Handle bar height drops are about my limit. Yes they are riser bars! Mostly in urban/coastal situations so flat to flat and smooth paved surface. Jumps I’d love to be better at but there just isn’t anywhere in my local riding to practice enough. Most of the jumps appear to have been dug by school kids who were bored one day and then found something else to do. There’s some work on a small dirty jump spot near me but no progression up to it.

    seriousrikk
    Full Member

    Can I jump?

    No.

    Can I leave the ground and return to the ground when the speed of my bike and the angle of the ground come together in perfect harmony?

    Yes.

    My mission this winter is to change that a bit and learn to actively jump – mainly so I can start clearing the tabletops etc that I currently case pretty hard.

    supernova
    Full Member

    I’ve been mountain biking since 1985 and I still can’t jump, wheelie or do any of the other tricks that seem to be the measure of one’s skills that the mtb press have always held up as a mark of being a ‘real’ mountain biker. As far as I’m concerned that’s a different sport really from what I do, which is ride up mountains and then down them.

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