Can you be happy without a life plan?

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  • Can you be happy without a life plan?
  • RealMan
    Member

    Sometimes.

    Your brother has made a brown, cylindrical and sticky plan.

    Premier Icon wwaswas
    Subscriber

    I’m the ‘you’ to my brothers ‘your brother’.

    I’m happy (apparently as happy as him) but certainly poorer than he is.

    Premier Icon GHill
    Subscriber

    I don’t even really know what a life plan is, but I think I’m happy.

    Unless I don’t know what that is either.

    crikey
    Member

    He knows where he’s going

    Hmmm, or he’s a bit too short on imagination to be able to consider the alternative, or a bit too scared to consider that things may not go according to ‘plans’.

    He might be ‘special’ he might be ‘successful’, but neither of these always equate to happiness.

    Relax, live life your way, it’s not a race to see who gets to be the most successful, it’s a journey worth savouring.

    FunkyDunc
    Member

    If he has a life plan for everything he will only end up being very disapointed.

    You can have aspirations and goals but be prepared to change them

    Life plan?

    Sounds a bit anal and boring to me but, but hey ho if it makes him feel happy and achieve what he wants best of luck to him.

    nobtwidler
    Member

    I am planning on making a plan someday might do it at the end and it will look like I followed it perfectly!

    bristolbiker
    Member

    life is what happens while your busy making other plans…. or summin’….

    crikey
    Member

    …and if I were you, I would plan on taking a small bottle filled with urine on the next trip to his house, and I would plan on emptying it into his shoes.

    Didn’t plan for that, did he?

    wors
    Member

    lifes a journey not a destination.

    camo16
    Member

    Thanks guys.

    I thought maybe it was me.

    Frankly, this ‘life plan’ business gave me the willies… apparently, bro has worked with a Buddha-like single pointed mind for more than a decade to realise his plan.

    Meanwhile, I was getting ratted, riding hill and dale, and generally wondering what next Tuesday would feel like.

    This forum is great… as is the hive.

    😉

    flip
    Member

    Never had a plan and like it that way, if you’d have told me 5 yrs ago(working 12 hr night shifts in a factory) i’d have my own business and would have spent this week at college aquiring my pesticide license i’d have told you to piss off 😐

    Ecky-Thump
    Member

    My 17 yo son is not sure what to do and lack direction.
    He seemed shocked when I told him that I don’t know what I want to do when (if) I grow up 😳

    Premier Icon big_scot_nanny
    Subscriber

    **** that! I find a general idea helps, but I ma not the kind of person who has a “life plan” and it would make me miserable to create one.

    A bit more “seat of the pants” for me, and it’s fun!

    Having said that, having a plan to get us back to Scotland to live would be good. Living in switzerland with 2 (almost 3) kids it’s gettign mroe and more difficult to figure that bit out!

    Kev

    Meanwhile, I was getting ratted, riding hill and dale, and generally wondering what next Tuesday would feel like.

    Now that’s a good plan. Some vague goals might not go a miss… you know making it to 30, nailing some massive drop off, that sort of thing. But your bro sounds like he lives to work… that’s a life failure.

    wors
    Member

    .and if I were you, I would plan on taking a small bottle filled with urine on the next trip to his house, and I would plan on emptying it into his shoes.

    Didn’t plan for that, did he?

    😆

    Ecky-Thump
    Member

    I guess its a “personality type” thing.
    This is me summed up nicely and I can’t see a life plan dropping out of that!

    randomjeremy
    Member

    Entropy means rigid plans inevitably fail. Just go with the flow and enjoy the ride.

    Premier Icon mactheknife
    Subscriber

    I have 2 brothers, one is a vet and has always known exactly what he wanted to do. He is one of the happiest guys i know and an inspiration to me in many ways, The other is a complete ditherer and just goes with the flow. He loves his life and with a masters in zoology decided he was bored last year and is now teaching english in vietnam. Me i was very motivated in my chosen careers until about last year when for some reason i hit a plateau and realised that i had finally got to exactly the place i wanted to go and kind of lost interest. I dont think i am as happy as my brothers because of a few choices i have made but…..in answer to your question it really doesn’t matter about plans. What matters is the happiness that others bring to your life and the happiness you bring to theirs. Live a good life and try to be happy. The rest will hopefully fall into place.

    mrlugz
    Member

    I plan on retiring in less than 30 years.

    Somewhere with a warmer climate.

    Other than that, take it as it comes.

    Premier Icon kimbers
    Subscriber

    it takes a special type to be fulfilled by academic chemistry!

    i dont think i ever had a plan, but im quite happy about where my lifes ended up

    is suspect worrying about it too much will just get in the way of enjoying life anyway

    camo16
    Member

    Ecky-Thump, this personality type thing is fascinating.

    I’ve been tested and apparently I’m an INTP, which means I “live in the world of theoretical possibilities”, “seek clarity in everything” and am an “absent-minded professor”. Av it, bro!

    This is my favourite bit from the INTP case file:

    Their natural drive to turn theories into concrete understanding may turn into a feeling of personal responsibility to solve theoretical problems, and help society move towards a higher understanding.

    Maybe this makes me life plan immune?

    sobriety
    Member

    I had a life plan until earlier this year, when it got spectacularly nuked. Since one of the main tenets of the plan was ‘This plan is subject to change’ I’m actually finding not having a plan, just more of a general direction rather refreshing, and I’m a damn sight more cheerful now than I was three months ago, so there!

    Premier Icon Garry_Lager
    Subscriber

    Like your bro, I have pursued high level academic chemistry for years. I’ll probably know your bro if he is an organic chemist (and if he really is at a high level). The path to success is indeed very clearly defined for the academic track. So if you’re on it, then this is reassuring in a way. The challenges are clear and understood, which is good. This sort of thing is more the exception though – most people find their own way in life without such structures in place.

    Happiness, though, is a different animal. The sharp end of scientific research (or anything else for that matter) is not a happy place. That’s not to say it’s a miserable place – anyone who has a job that allows total creativity is blessed. But I don’t know too many chemistry profs who I’d characterise as ‘happy’.

    jackthedog
    Member

    I don’t have any sort of plan. I don’t think our world is a great one to be making plans in, with things stacked as precariously as they are. I’ve also seen that plans can be so easily ruined by the simplest of occurrences.

    Those I know with some kind of solid life plan are generally those with a lack of imagination, and their plans tend to be based around the most dull things. Conversely, everyone I know that is remotely exciting generally hasn’t got a clue what they’re doing or what they might want to be doing in a few years time.

    I think finding what you’re best at and trying to do that as much as possible is far more important than forming some sort of long term plan. Generally we enjoy doing the things we’re best at, and we do best what we do most.

    With solid long term plans you can end up goal obsessed and before you know it you’ve died having not paid attention to anything except the next goal.

    The chances are, with the human condition being the way it is, if you actually made good on your plans and achieved everything you set out to achieve, you’d find yourself no more content than before you started. So learning to feel complete with ones lack of completion might be a wiser move.

    Life, you could say, is a bit like cycle touring. Some people like to meander and take in the views, to chat and stop for a pint on the way. Others like to get their heads down and crank away to the next check point as quickly as possible. The latter might get to the end quicker and earn internet bragging rights, but the former probably got more from the trip.

    Unless you actually enjoy going hell for leather all the time, which can of course be quite fun. Speed just has that one unfortunate side affect – the faster you go, the quicker you’ll invariably get to the end.

    deviant
    Member

    Life plans are one of those horrible Americanisms that makes its way into British language every now and again….same as 5 years plans and 10 year plans etc….previously we’d have said somebody was ambitious or simply wanted to do well in their career.

    I started young in my chosen field and then took on a mortgage at 26….i like my job and my little house….i am fortunate enough to have a small disposable income that allows me to ride bikes (both pedal and motor)….and thats good enough for me.

    The problem with making firm plans is that if they arent achieved then disappointment and a sense of failure can set in….who wants to make themselves feel like that?

    As a baseline i try to maintain the above (my career and my mortgage)….if i go for a promotion at work then it will be a nice bonus but i wont set it in stone when that will be….i like to do one big thing at a time….life is simpler and more enjoyable for me like that, i see friends trying to do too many things at once and they even look stressed on a night out….not for me thanks.

    One of the most liberating things i learnt shortly before turning 30 was the expression “get f##ked”….provided my actions wont jeopardise my job or my mortgage then i am more than prepared to tell somebody (or metaphorically speaking a situation) to “get f##ked” and then walk away….its the beautiful simplicity i like and its made life so much easier.

    camo16
    Member

    My brother (aka the ‘special one’ or the ‘successful one’) has a life plan. He’s pursued high-level academic chemistry for years. He knows where he’s going. This knowledge, he tells me, makes him happy because he knows he has the talent and the connections to follow it through.

    Personally, I don’t have the faintest clue where my life’s heading. I’d love to have a plan. I’d be equally happy to embrace the moment and wallow in the sensations of the present. That sounds pretty rewarding too.

    But I’ve got to the age where I know neither’s going to happen. All I can do is think about the next month or so and hope nothing brown, cylindrical and sticky hits the 16 fan.

    So, do you need a life plan to be fulfilled – to be happy?

    < Apologises in advance for absence of flippancy. Promises to do better next time. >

    huws
    Member

    I expect there’s something about mountain biking that attracts looser, freer thinking out doorsy types so the above replies which mostly state they take life as it comes are to be expected, over on golftrackworld they’re probably laying out their plans to have a C-class at 26 an E-class at 32 an S-class at 40 before retiring to the golf courses of southern Spain with an SL by 50.

    The world is full of different types of people and that’s great.

    Anna B
    Member

    I think you absolutely can be happy without a life plan, just like you could be happy or unhappy WITH a life plan.

    For a long time I did things because they made me happy, rather than that they were part of a plan. My degree, and subsequent job that I fell into and remained in for 9 years for example.

    Now I’ve had a career change, and new job last year and with that has come career ambitions and more of a plan, and I like the way that feels. My advice would be live how it makes you feel happy, and you will know if/when you feel like you want to change that. Also remember – comparisons are pointless!

    jonba
    Member

    Have a plan to pursue happiness. A specific plan may be a bad things if things don’t work out.

    Premier Icon ton
    Subscriber

    life would be pretty boring if it was all laid out in plans in front of you.
    i take each day as it comes, always have.
    dont have a pension so will keep on working as long as i have to.
    life throws up challenges and we as a family try to deal with them as and when.

    coffeeking
    Member

    I try not to plan, planning just leaves you open to failing. If you fail to plan, everything is a success.

    GlitterGary
    Member

    I planned to buy a yum yum in Greggs, but when I’d got there they’d all sold out. I changed my plan unexpectedly and bought 6 doughnuts instead. Life is, as they say, wonderful.

    alpin
    Member

    i’ve had a life plan since leaving school.. it’s called “me”.

    i’ve not planned things as such, more that i’ve said that “x” is something i’d like to do and i’ve gone and done it or taken an opportunity when one has arisen. most of my decision have been short-termist, but mostly with positive long-term consequences.

    life is too important to take seriously…. do what makes you happy, not what others think you should be doing….

    ilovemygears
    Member

    i get stoned and ride my bike 🙂

    If you find something you want to do, then plan it and do it. That kind of achievement can be feel rewarding and give confidence.

    I’ve never felt that strongly about anything. Am I happy? Well I suspect that’s a relative feeling and more to do with one’s innate personality. But not setting and achieving goals does seem to dent my self-esteem a bit.

    The problem is that I cannot set out to satisfy life aspirations without upsetting other important people. And the idea of setting any professional goals at work is a joke – we do what we’re told.

    Premier Icon nedrapier
    Subscriber

    Ecky-Thump. Just read your link. Spooky! No life plan here either! Currently trying to work towards an idea of where might I want to live next, where might be a good place to bring up kids, what I might do for a living there.

    “What do I want to do when I grow up?” really! 🙂

    Markie
    Member

    mrlugz – Member
    I plan on retiring in less than 30 years.

    Somewhere with a warmer climate.

    Other than that, take it as it comes.
    But funding that does require planning now, surely?

    No life plan here, but I got lucky. Cousin with a five year rolling life plan has done spectacularly, mind!

    PeterPoddy
    Member

    WTF is a Life Plan???

    I mean, are you flippin’ seroius?

    Other than “work as little as possible” and “don’t worry if someone else has a bigger TV” what else do you really need to know?

Viewing 40 posts - 1 through 40 (of 86 total)

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