Buying a house in a flood risk zone – bad idea?

Home Forum Chat Forum Buying a house in a flood risk zone – bad idea?

Viewing 19 posts - 46 through 64 (of 64 total)
  • Buying a house in a flood risk zone – bad idea?
  • chr15
    Member

    Thanks for all the input. Big debt yes, but still room for some flippancy (Or I wouldn’t have asked on here!), but thanks TooTall.

    It is the nicest house in town for the best price, and not the only one at risk from rising water, but it’s not dirt cheap either. Will be asking for more info on the last flood – If it was a trickle down the back stairs that got the floor wet then adaptations might provide enough peace of mind but if it was a gusher through the front door I don’t think I’d take the risk. Definitely a concern that more extreme weather may be becoming more common and that flood defences planned for the town are likely to concentrate on the town centre and may make things worse on the outskirts either upstream or down… (Levels were raised upstream last year by a huge whirlpool forming where the two rivers meet, bet they weren’t expecting that to happen!)

    Premier Icon footflaps
    Subscriber

    You could just spend a few grand making it a bit more flood proof:

    http://www.flood-guards.co.uk/

    number18
    Member

    A flood plain is just a line drawn on a map by someone.

    I just don’t think I’d ever take the risk of living somewhere like that, fortunately in Huddersfield there are plenty of hills to live on!

    Can you just build some relly thick walls around the house to create a barrier?

    Premier Icon bails
    Subscriber

    If it was a trickle down the back stairs that got the floor wet…..but if it was a gusher through the front door……

    Premier Icon miketually
    Subscriber

    I’ve never been flooded but am within 100m of a lake, and even though I’m about 30m vertically higher than the lake some companies won’t cover me!

    My sister struggled to get contents insurance for a flat she was renting, because it was right by the river. It was a second floor flat.

    We pay over the odds because there’s a river at the bottom of our garden. The garden’s 300 feet long and slopes downhill the whole way – if our house floods half of Darlington would be under water.

    Premier Icon footflaps
    Subscriber

    A flood plain is just a line drawn on a map by someone.

    I think you mean a map. A flood plain is plain on which a river floods…..

    hora
    Member

    Miketually in Look at my fancy house willy-waving 😉

    trail_rat
    Member

    seems to me like they might have been just . Flooding damages more than just the interior and your posessions you know ?

    Premier Icon miketually
    Subscriber

    Miketually in Look at my fancy house willy-waving

    The flood water almost reached the stable once 😉

    fasthaggis
    Member

    FIL is a retired civil engineer ,he used to specialize in river and tidal models ,and did a lot of work on dams for hydroelectric schemes.
    He get still gets the odd bit of consultant work and is shocked by some planners casual attitude to ancient flood plain areas.
    Very much,”Oh it hasn’t flooded round here in years ,it will be fine”.
    There is still an ignorance and lack of understanding in to how some rivers and waterways need to(and used to) be maintained and looked after,or it will come back and bite you.

    I just don’t think I’d ever take the risk of living somewhere like that, fortunately in Huddersfield there are plenty of hills to live on!

    Did I just read ‘fortunately’, ‘live’ and ‘in Huddersfield’ all in the same sentence? 😯

    “See, thats where I would see the opportunity to get a really nice house a lot cheaper, because so many people would have exactly that reaction.”

    first rule of buying a house. location.

    a nice house in a shit area is still shit.

    This.

    And chances are you’ll want to move at some point. Which will sell faster – a smaller house away from a flood plain, or a bigger, cheaper house that sits in the middle of one?

    rob2
    Member

    I worked on the original project that underpins most flooding maps – the flood estimation handbook – on the hydrology bit. Those were the days!

    I would look at the EA maps, get the history of flooding etc. Basically get the facts out and see what it looks like all together.

    It’s not just river flooding you need to worry about mind it’s also the sewers. Your house may not flood, but the sewers often will back up if flooding happens near by and flood your house that way.

    Personally, unless it’s very cheap or the area really hasn’t seen much historic flooding (i.e. look back over the last 100 years) I don’t think it’s worth it.

    There is a flood database on the british hydrological society website where you can look for historic floods by river etc.

    samuri
    Member

    Which is great – if the OP wasn’t asking for advice about the biggest debt he’ll ever get in to.

    I only provide flippant advice if the the OP has had their question answered seriously.
    You can check back if you like, it’s a rule of mine.

    Any way, I said I agreed with binners after he had posted a picture of his roadriver.

    CountZero
    Member

    If everyone stopped turning their gardens into hard paved areas flood plains into large housing estates we would have much less of a problem as a lot of water would be absorbed into the ground at source rather than just channelled along to somewhere else to cause a problem.

    There is a large housing estate in Chippenham, called Monkton Park, which the River Avon curves around. It’s actually built on a bund, setting it a few metres above the flood plain, which used to flood regularly, until the river was dredged and a new weir put in. Recently there were suggestions that as part of the drive to increase the town’s population even more, houses could be built safely on the floodplain. Now, there have been a number of occasions when the river level has risen to the point that, while it’s not gone over its bank, the area itself has filled with water! Great for those residents who wish to have water features without needing too much effort…
    Frankly, the whole idea is bloody daft.

    grantway
    Member

    Wouldn’t do it
    Especially at the bottom of an hill

    Kuco
    Member

    Wouldn’t do it
    Especially at the bottom of an hill

    Agree, seen a few properties flooded due to run off from fields that backed onto them.

Viewing 19 posts - 46 through 64 (of 64 total)

The topic ‘Buying a house in a flood risk zone – bad idea?’ is closed to new replies.