Buying a bike – Paying by Paypal Gift?

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Viewing 20 posts - 46 through 65 (of 65 total)
  • Buying a bike – Paying by Paypal Gift?
  • Premier Icon D0NK
    Subscriber

    Man walks into shop, picks up packet of crisps that cost 50p, goes to pay shop keeper then asks him to pay 57p to cover the cost or reaching over and taking the money…

    crap analogy, price on packet is “offer to sell” or some such not a contract ie if they price it up for 20p by mistake he doesn’t have to honour it. Plus this is distance selling entirely different, man checks local shop webcam sees crisps for sale at 50p, emails shop owner to send to other side of country, shop owner figures there’s plenty can go wrong so charges 57p for the transaction.

    Premier Icon D0NK
    Subscriber

    I used Paypal Gift last month to buy a bike……
    I was stood next to the seller with my hands on the bars when I transfered it though (by phone).

    that seems weird presumably a large sum, would have done cash myself PP just seems over complicated for face to face selling. Tho maybe would have taken a diminutive martial arts expert big intimidating looking bloke with me to carry the cash tho 🙂

    Premier Icon mikewsmith
    Subscriber

    fair enough my bad, if I ever sell owt on here again though the price advertised will be the price to pay….

    Premier Icon D0NK
    Subscriber

    I just said your analogy was bad, i thought your other line was fair – assuming I read it right

    Advertise the price (including paypal fees), offer discount for cash on collection (loose the PP fees) if you want.

    as a rule I don’t use PPG, it’s too easy to work out the cost of the fees and how much you need to send to cover them: http://www.rememberingrolbe.com/paypal.htm for example.

    I’ve had a couple of things not turn up from forum based transactions and always got my money back through facilities that are not available to PPG users.

    Premier Icon Pawsy_Bear
    Subscriber

    Sorry both wrong. The price is an invitation to treat, recieve an offer for the goods.

    Under UK law, the price tag on an item displayed in a shop window (or advertised over public media) is an invitation-to-treat and not an offer of sale (the acceptance of which constitutes a contract).

    Once you have agreed a price you have made a contract even if its verbal. Hence ticking the Terms and Conditions box constitutes agreement of a contract between both parties.

    So to answer the question even if the seller says it includes other services such as paypal protection its all conditional upon an agreement between both parties. Thus there is no right or wrong on who pays what.

    Premier Icon mikewsmith
    Subscriber

    Yep Donk that was my point. All for a simple life really….

    By the sounds of it the changes in postage might signal an end to the cheap small parts side of the forum.

    Premier Icon D0NK
    Subscriber

    The price is an invitation to treat, recieve an offer for the goods.

    knew it was some sort of legalese (an ex-gf did law, I obviously didn’t listen to her very much) fair enough 🙂

    Premier Icon mikewsmith
    Subscriber

    now awaits a bill from Pawsy Bear for legal advice….

    Premier Icon tomhoward
    Subscriber

    IMO the buyer should pay the fees, on top of an advertised price, as its a service that exclusivly benefits the buyer.

    To those that say sellers should factor it in, why couldn’t a buyer do this? Like in real life auctions. Seller pays any applicable fees to have an item in an auction (or in any place to sell the item, like the classifieds), buyer pays the auction house commission on top of the final sale price.

    treat paypal gift as cash, nothing more.

    Premier Icon mikewsmith
    Subscriber

    buyer pays the auction house commission on top of the final sale price.

    The stuff I have sold at auction had the fees taken from the seller, as the auction house was doing the selling for the seller. (this was mostly animals but the principle carries though)

    Premier Icon Pawsy_Bear
    Subscriber

    ha ha ha as you agreed to pay Mike via ‘social media’ I feel a contact has been made – invoice incoming!

    IMHO if its your money you should protect it yourself by whatever means necessary at your cost. Caveat emptor, ‘Let the buyer beware’ is good advice

    Premier Icon Pawsy_Bear
    Subscriber

    as an aside I had a contractor give me a verbal ‘its fully inclusive price’. Are you sure? Does it include x and x? Oh yes fully inclusive! Ok its agreed at that price. Job done. Then invocie came in plus £10K of what was agreed. He was reminded of the conversation that we had over the phone and making a contract. I did not pay 😉

    Premier Icon T666DOM
    Subscriber

    AS a seller I’d accept PP, PPG, Bank Transfer or cash on collection. If a buyer insists on PP when the others are available I don’t think it’s unreasonable for them to pay for [their own] peace of mind.

    bigyinn
    Member

    I.e Bike up for £600, travel costs =£50 so he offers £550 for bike and explains this to seller, if they don’t like it he moves on to the next one.

    Seriously? You have to travel and you expect a reduction from the seller? REALLY?
    Do you ask a for reduction from Tescos to cover petrol costs when you drive there to do the weekly shop?
    If I was the seller I’d be politely suggesting that you are expecting a little too much there.

    Premier Icon aracer
    Subscriber

    that seems weird presumably a large sum, would have done cash myself PP just seems over complicated for face to face selling. Tho maybe would have taken a diminutive martial arts expert big intimidating looking bloke with me to carry the cash tho

    You cover the reason why in your second sentence. PP gift is effectively the same as cash (a point which still seems lost on some) both from a security and a cost POV, so what’s the downside of doing it that way? The upside is having no security worries about withdrawing and carrying around the cash. My largest ever cash purchase was £3000 for a car – would quite happily not do that again.

    I paid PP gift for a unicycle – a bit less than most here are paying for a bike, but a lot more than the average man in the street would. That was to somebody I’d never met, though I’d met people who’d met him and also nearly bought the uni when he bought it from the previous seller, so knew the history. I also had my mate collecting it from his house.

    Premier Icon D0NK
    Subscriber

    You cover the reason why in your second sentence.

    I was joking, have carried a fair bit of cash before and not really been worried, but

    PP gift is effectively the same as cash

    good point, they can’t claim back or anything, I stand corrected and may consider it in future

    <edit>oh yeah and you can pay for it via CC something cash in hand wouldn’t let you do

    Premier Icon aracer
    Subscriber

    you can pay for it via CC

    You can, but as mentioned above you’ll pay fees.

    You might have been joking, but I’m not – would prefer not to carry several hundred in cash, let alone several thousand.

    Premier Icon mikewsmith
    Subscriber

    yes those fees, what is it again
    2.4%
    £2.40/£100
    £24/£1000
    It can cost you £2.50 to use some cash machines
    such a rip off….

    Premier Icon aracer
    Subscriber

    3.4% I don’t use cash machines which charge.

    All a bit silly though, as it’s easy to link a PP account to your bank account and so not pay fees on PP gift, at which point it’s just like getting cash out of your account from a machine which doesn’t charge. As discussed above, there’s no obvious advantage to using a CC with PP gift.

Viewing 20 posts - 46 through 65 (of 65 total)

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