Building bike storage out of this stuff… will I/my bikes die?

  • This topic has 19 replies, 14 voices, and was last updated 1 week ago by  ajaj.
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  • Building bike storage out of this stuff… will I/my bikes die?
  • We’ve now got more bikes than we have secure shed space for at home, so I’m thinking of building some additional covered storage in our back yard.

    Mainly for speed (and for a handful of other reasons), I’m thinking about using this kind of stuff…

    https://www.shop4handrail.co.uk/standard-range-1-c.asp

    …to make a ‘shed’ shaped frame, onto which I’ll first fix a corrugated plastic roof, and eventually (maybe?) timber sides.

    Seems like it should be pretty sturdy, I can build it to fit the space I have, and I’ll also be able to secure the bikes to the actual frame itself without adding any further anchors, etc.

    But, I’m 99.9% likely to be missing something obvious here. What is it, STW? What am I missing?

    Premier Icon Greybeard
    Subscriber

    eventually (maybe?) timber sides

    I’d want sides on before I put bikes in – one of the best ways to stop people stealing your bikes is to avoid letting them see that you have any.

    ajaj
    Member

    We have bikes hanging off a scaffolding pole held up by Kee Klamp fittings. It’s fine. We do have a bracing pole along the span.

    You’ll need to figure out how to attach the bikes to a pole, it’s not trivial. You will also need bases for the uprights (otherwise they’ll bore their way through whatever they’re standing on, sorry if that’s obvious, it wasn’t to me). When measuring remember to allow space for the fittings.

    Kee Klamp say that they can support 900kg if you do them up right and don’t reuse them.

    cbike
    Member

    It’s a faffy way to build a shed or bike store that is not very secure. If you want timber sides, then build it from Timber and fit anchor mounts into the ground. Or buy a shed or bike store?

    It’ll add expense and weight but you could effectively create stalls in your bike stable. That’ll give side bars to lock too and also make it too tight to manoeuvre in but I’d also cover it before putting bikes in.

    A heavy front door could be made too.

    It’s a faffy way to build a shed or bike store that is not very secure

    I was thinking it would be the opposite. Once I’d cut the tubes to length, it would just be a case of quickly bolting it all together using the clamp joints. A bit like big Lego Technic. Then some timber cladding which would only need to be cut to length. In terms of security, the bikes would lock to the frame itself – no need for ground anchors. I can probably build the frame (tubes and clamps) for less than £200. Then another £100 or so for timber cladding. It would be sturdier than anything I could buy for £300… and anything that I could build myself from scratch out of timber.

    I’d want sides on before I put bikes in – one of the best ways to stop people stealing your bikes is to avoid letting them see that you have any.

    Yeah, agreed. We’ve got high fences/walls so can’t see into the yard from outside of the yard, but I would build some sides – and a door.

    It’ll add expense and weight but you could effectively create stalls in your bike stable.

    Hmmm.

    Premier Icon wwaswas
    Subscriber

    some timber cladding which would only need to be cut to length

    and attached to the tubes (which will be uneven wherever there’s one of those joints)?

    you’d have to drill the tubes for every screw holding cladding on which would take forever and make them prone to rust through?

    Nah, few of these plus some battens, and it’ll be reet!

    joshvegas
    Member

    Can i just clarify you’re going to lock your bike to the frame? The frame what is bolted together with grub screws…

    … Don’t leave a multitool on your bike, they’ll take your bikes then come back for bits of shed

    UrbanHiker
    Member

    I’ve been looking for a way to make a re-configurable set of shelves for my office. These fitting look ideal. If I coupled them with some pine planks, would they be strong enough to support stacks of books, PC monitors etc? I’m sure they would, just thinking out loud really.

    Sorry to hijack the thread.

    Premier Icon jimdubleyou
    Subscriber

    Don’t leave a multitool on your bike, they’ll take your bikes then come back for bits of shed

    Once you’ve sure you’ve got it built how you want, hammer ball bearings into the grub screws.

    ctk
    Member

    How many bikes? A purpose built Asgard shed wouldnt be much more would it?

    Once you’ve sure you’ve got it built how you want, hammer ball bearings into the grub screws.

    All well and good but a hacksaw would go through that tubing with ease. It’s nothing more than a glorified rain shelter security-wise.

    I’ve been looking for a way to make a re-configurable set of shelves for my office. These fitting look ideal. If I coupled them with some pine planks, would they be strong enough to support stacks of books, PC monitors etc? I’m sure they would, just thinking out loud really.

    Sorry to hijack the thread.

    Easily, in fact well over engineered. People build similar shelving from electrical conduit which is much smaller.

    Looks like you’ve decided to go with this, and make it work to me, Better making a timber shelter and fitting some ground anchors.

    sarawak
    Member

    I’ve been looking for a way to make a re-configurable set of shelves for my office.

    What about Spur shelving?
    Or Big Dug?

    UrbanHiker
    Member

    @sarawak, thanks for the ideas.
    spur – really after free standing.
    big dug – and a little less agricultural looking 😉

    Can i just clarify you’re going to lock your bike to the frame? The frame what is bolted together with grub screws…

    See… I told you I was 99.9% likely to be missing something! :oD

    andyl
    Member

    the idea has legs, but I caan’t seem to get onto their site so can’t see the prices.

    I was wondering about the grub screws. You can either hammer ball bearings into the hexes or get some security torx type (just to make it a little harder) and then face all of the heads round the back to make it very awkward. Failing that glue therm in with some epoxy and then if you ever need to dismantle it then you just need to blow torch them to break the epoxy (or high strength threadlock). But if they are galvanised then wear a face mask when blowtorching it. If there is a stainless option then that would be better.

    For added security you could fill the tub with concrete and some rebar to make them beyond a hacksaw or small cordless grinder.

    I was just about to start a thread about making a small bike and tool shed (roller cabinet) out of 2″ thick t&g dungwall with some kind of metal mesh to prevent breaking through the walls. Some form of metal frame inside would be good too. I need something temporary in our new rental place but an Asguard would only do the bikes as I only have room to put it up on the path.

    andyl
    Member

    Would scaffold poles be cheaper?

    ajaj
    Member

    There are more fittings for 48.3mm (scaffold) tube but it isn’t / wasn’t noticeably cheaper.

    It’s not quick stuff to cut through with a hacksaw. Easier to cut through your Asguard or wooden shed.

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