Building a 'rest of life' bike?

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  • Building a 'rest of life' bike?
  • fasthaggis
    Member

    Why not try some quality window shopping

    Even if you don’t buy ,you might see your dream bike ๐Ÿ˜‰

    Premier Icon Pickers
    Subscriber

    My first thought was Spa Cycles, but I really like the look of a Roberts Roughstuff frameset

    Premier Icon firestarter
    Subscriber

    Any of the thorn do anything for you, at cycle sense an tad they have some nice van nic that may fit the bill and a dutch firms stuff , is it kuga ?? If memory serves. That could be worth a look mate

    If I had the cash I’d be goin with a custom build and get exactly what you want, and a rohloff lol

    globalti
    Member

    This is my “rest of life” mountain bike – a gradual evolution of bits and pieces that have travelled some way with me and ended up staying because they’re so good. It’s very light, very fast, very comfortable and should last forever – although I read about a cracked Global TH1.5 frame last week so now I’m not so certain. A bike like this is easy to carry up mountains, fast and reliable on a long mountain day and a good deal less tiring than a heavy FS rig. The weakest point is those Hope wheel bearings, which do seem to need replacing every couple of years. It has thumbshifters too, dinky little Suntour XC Pro jobs, which can be indexed or friction so are perfect for reliability in the field.

    I don’t plan on changing much on this bike, it should do me now until I can’t ride any longer. It won’t get much use anyway because I’ve gone over to the more subtle delights of the road though it will be out in the snow this afternoon!

    Jones for sure – mine will be staying with me! – 3 bikes in 1 – 700c touring wheels, for , er, touring, 50mm wheels for the rough stuff and a fat front for fun times = 1 bike to rule them all!

    boblo
    Member

    @Globalti With a saddle angle like that, you’ll not have to worry about having the snip when you’re done breeding ๐Ÿ™‚

    bencooper
    Member

    I’ve built a few “rest of my life” bikes for people. Generally they’re at or past retirement though ๐Ÿ˜‰

    Considerations have been things like can you add electric assist later and stuff like that…

    Premier Icon stevemakin
    Subscriber

    Salsa Fargo ๐Ÿ˜‰

    Premier Icon ton
    Subscriber

    if the folk who think i am calling it a day, cos i am too old, or lazy read my op, the reason i am doing it it because i am no longer able to ride offroad like i did in the past, on the terrain that i did in the past, at the speed i did in the past.
    therefore, this rest of life bike is NOT a symbol of submission, it is a bike to enable me to carry on doing the kind of riding that is suitable for me to carry on into oldage.

    Premier Icon Grace
    Subscriber

    Take a trip to Bespoked Bristol in April for some inspiration….consider 9 speed stuff as road and mtb can be mix and matched…(they made the cable pull ratios different when they went 10 speed)..or go rohloff/alfine..(i prefer the latter)…something like a Singular Peregrine but custom would be where my money would go.

    gravitysucks
    Member

    Fargo + a zillion.
    On road, off road, tour, mtb, road, mudguards with big tyres, more bosses than you can shake a stick at, suspension or rigid forks, variour pannier options, drop bar or sit up and beg position if your back goes and available in Ti if you get a stiffy for it.

    1 shed
    Member

    Built up a Van Dessel WTF for similar reasons, more ride from the door than bike for life. Its quite heavy but good fun. I’ve ridden it round Delamere no problems, road and bridleways in Norfolk and plan to ride a easy short tour in Scotland this summer. 29r wheels, drop bars with 42/24 x 11/28 gearing. If you get the new bike built up how about a STW bimble to celebrate.

    gusamc
    Member

    suspect I’m there

    2 O 5s 2005(think) + 2009, building up 26″, 9sp, generic bits spares set along the way, more than enough function for my ability, only change would be a motorbike if the law opened up for offroad (ho ho lookout for the falling pig excrement) and keeping an eye on leccy bikes for when my body really starts to go/when we get the ‘last house’ so we can nip down the pub

    retirement, caravan and remote Scotland plans

    Premier Icon wool
    Subscriber

    Got a Merlin XLM in 96 as a bike for life three years later replaced with a Orange Sub 5 that’s gone to ( Fisher Rosscoe currently no doubt replaced with a 29er full suz)
    The only bike I kept hold of is the Dave Yates from 91 in 531c, did 65 miles yesterday on it.
    A contender certainly. Salsa Fargo, Steel crosser with disks something like that would be on the list.

    puffnutts
    Member

    Go on a frame building course – such as the Dave Yates one. Build the bike you want. You will never sell the first frame you have built/nobody will ever buy it.

    I built a fixed gear road bike on his course a while back. Due to a change in my commute to a much hillier area and a dodgy knee i do not ride it as much as I would like but i will never get rid of it. A very nice riding frame.

    If you don’t fancy building but want a nice light tourer try the Gunnar Sport. I have one with steel forks – very nice True Temper frame. Does everything you require above – fits 28s the full guards or larger without. Nice to ride without a rack and lighter wheels also.

    Premier Icon igm
    Subscriber

    Ton – if you want a look at my Gryphon, let me know. Too small for you but it’ll give you some idea.

    Oh yes – you don’t sell aerials for DAB do you?

    Premier Icon ampthill
    Subscriber

    Full marks for throwing yourself into what you can do rather worrying about what you can’t do.

    In your position I would be talking to a frame builder. Mainly as its just such a good excuse.

    However an off the peg tourer would meet all your needs. A mate has a Dawes galaxy with replacement hand made wheels that would meet all of your needs off the peg. He has the bars really high although that is with quite alot of spacers. But if i was talking to a frame builder I’d be looking for something similar which could take 2 inch tyres.

    Do you know whether you want drop bars or not. That seems like the first question and all other decisions will follow this one

    Ayup Ton- maybe should get your old Peugeot hybrid you used to ride back out of the shed ๐Ÿ˜‰

    Seriously though,for different reasons I bought a Kona Sutra a few years back. It’s a great bike. Not the lightest,not the fastest but it has racks front and back,full guards, is capabale of a bit of off road and very comfortable for all day rides.All of which fits your description. I keep trying, but TBH I can’t find anything I don’t like about it.

    oldgit
    Member

    Audax bike.
    I have a Ti road bike from 2004, but I ended up putting old race bits on it over time, people just assume it’s my race bike now.

    I do get a sentimental attachment to things, like I would like a Bob Jackson Audax Club and built to last. No STIs bar shifters etc, and I’d look at it and think we’ll be around together for a while.
    So I think that’s the sort of thing to look at, they just seem immune from change!

    uponthedowns
    Member

    has anyone ever thought about building a bike that will last the rest of their lives?

    No, where’s the fun in that?

    Giving up buying bikes is like giving up on life.

    Premier Icon bigblackshed
    Subscriber

    Something bespoke. I like the idea of build it yourself. LINKY

    And a Rohloff.

    Premier Icon BigJohn
    Subscriber

    If I bought a motorbike it would last me the rest of my life.

    Less than a week, I reckon, which is why I’ve never got on one.

    Life is too short. Don’t buy a bike for life. Buy one for now. Love it and move on. What we want from biking changes with us. Don’t be tempted to define your riding by the bike you ride, I have two bike and it means I don’t have to pigeon hole myself in to one thing or another.

    Premier Icon curiousyellow
    Subscriber

    Something from Ibis I reckon.

    Premier Icon Northwind
    Subscriber

    I’ve already had my old carrera for most of my life, and it’s not going anywhere soon.

    But as much as I love my 2 mountain bikes, I don’t expect them to last forever- bits will wear out, new stuff will come along that does the same job better. I could build a bike today that’d need only minor replacement parts until the end of time, downside is it’d be ****.

    Premier Icon jameso
    Subscriber

    Giving up buying bikes is like giving up on life.

    ๐Ÿ™‚ and ‘life is too short to ride sh1t bikes’
    I shouldn’t say this when my wages depend on people buying bikes, but giving up on buying bikes because you’ve got a great bike or 2 that does it all and lasts is a good place to be, somewhere I like to be anyway. Consumerism is hugely over-rated.

    The Roberts Rough Stuff mentioned above – really nice.

    I’d second whoever said going to Bristol Bespoked if you want something special and don’t mind a wait(my Paulos Quiros took 6 months from first contact to built frame)

    I looked at lots of different builders on the net and then went and spoke to 5 at Bristol.

    Flashy
    Member

    I have a surly 1 x1 and karate monkey that I intend to keep long term. The 1 x 1 has changed guises over the years and my favourite KM is currently fixed. Both may end up a afined if my knees finally pack up.
    I quite like the idea of a Jones except it’s probably too big and I’d have to sell one of the Karate Monkeys and I like them too much.

    I have ordered a custom bike from 18 bikes which will be a rest of life bike.

    I’ll have my other bikes along side it but ultimately this is the bike that will last through the ages.

    Simple hand made Singlespeed road frame, Upright position, Pauls components throughout,

    A bike for riding to the pubs, shops or just going for an easy ride down the summer lanes.

Viewing 29 posts - 41 through 69 (of 69 total)

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