Viewing 15 posts - 41 through 55 (of 55 total)
  • British parents are more physically active than their children
  • Premier Icon funkmasterp
    Subscriber

    What I’m finding bizarre is the whole kids have to be doing something seven days a week from a young age. I can only recall getting kicked out of the Cubs. I was too busy climbing trees, riding bikes and being a kid.

    It almost seems like it’s a competition for the parents. My child attends x number of classes per week sort of thing. Just seems weird. My eldest (5) just does swimming, occasional bouldering and a multi-sport class. The rest of his free time is spent playing Pokémon (with me and invisible Pokémon for us to battle), kicking a ball about or generally playing.

    stevextc
    Member

    It says something when there’s so much talk of kids going to clubs or the gym, as if that stuff is a requirement for staying active. It’s exactly that kind of thinking that’s the problem. If there are clubs nearby, and the kids want to go, great. However…

    Kids are active when you kick them out at 8am for their walk to school.

    They’re active when they get back and play football in the street.

    If they want to play cricket, or tennis, or anything else, they can play with their mates. Jumpers for goalposts and all of that.

    I don’t think I’m being nostalgic either. There are in some cases very real practical and safety concerns, but that is a problem we have created and it is one that we can undo. Kids should be entitled to these freedoms and I think it’s somewhat shameful to construct a society without them.

    I completely agree but we increasingly live in a nanny state that wants to take away these freedoms in the name of *something*.
    I’m not really sure what that *something* actually is…. or if its warm and snuggy or soft and wet.. I’m not even sure it’s known to them whomever *them* is.

    It’s not just kids, it seems pervasive but this talk of kids in gyms and clubs obviously has many feeling that exercise is something needs to be done “safely” which means supervised?

    What for me is weirdest is although I don’t agree I end up going along with it to a large extent.
    My kid does after school activities … though it’s also convenient as his mum is teaching at the same school so it works out… but I guess also if he was to go to his best mates after school he’d end up playing some electronic game anyway…which is so weird as his mates’ parents bought their house on the common so their kids could play..

    One seemingly random thing struck me reading the news… BBC report the police prevented people leaving a shopping centre due to flooding and that is seemingly OK ??? That somehow it’s justifiable to essentially detain people who have done nothing wrong for their own safety?

    I can’t rationalize that … FFS before I was 10 I was swimming across Coniston… I wasn’t much older when I got washed out of Ingelborough and someone thinks it’s OK to decide if I can or can’t make my own way home through some floods?

    Premier Icon molgrips
    Member

    Kids are active when you kick them out at 8am for their walk to school.

    They’re active when they get back and play football in the street.

    These things are not universal. Some people just don’t like football. So I can’t exactly stand over my kids forcing them to kick the ball to and fro, can I? Yes, these things are quite cultural and you need to create the culture from babyhood, however a) by the time you realise how this works it’s too late, b) I don’t play or even watch football myself and c) there’s a large element of personality invovled. Kids are not all the same nor are they copies of their parents.

    Plus our school is too far away, and my daughter’s only 8.

    BBC report the police prevented people leaving a shopping centre due to flooding and that is seemingly OK ???

    They won’t have been detained, don’t think that is legal – just strongly advised I’d imagine. But in any case, since it’s the emergency services that have to pick up the pieces when people get into trouble it’s not unreasonable to strongly encourage people to accept their advice. And remember flood water is not nice clean lake water. I am a decent swimmer but there’s no way I’d go through floods just to avoid a night on a bench. Don’t be a statistic, filed under ‘idiots who defied advice’.

    stevextc
    Member

    These things are not universal. Some people just don’t like football. So I can’t exactly stand over my kids forcing them to kick the ball to and fro, can I? Yes, these things are quite cultural and you need to create the culture from babyhood, however a) by the time you realise how this works it’s too late, b) I don’t play or even watch football myself and c) there’s a large element of personality invovled. Kids are not all the same nor are they copies of their parents.

    Plus our school is too far away, and my daughter’s only 8.

    I don’t like football but when I was that age we just did STUFF…. sometimes football with jumpers and sometimes building rafts on the canal and sometimes building treehhouses or making trails for bikes…we moved when I was 10 so I’m remembering stuff based on where we lived knowing I was under 10… funnily enough weekends my dad watched football and that was enough to drive me from the house… but from memory I just remember “put your coat on” and the worst punishment being grounded.

    I just can’t imagine being able to do that today with the school interfering… it’s bad enough having to account for his bruises after a bit of MTB…last year was a huge panic when a year 4 kid walked home alone (a whole freakin 1/2 mile) …

    They won’t have been detained, don’t think that is legal – just strongly advised I’d imagine. But in any case, since it’s the emergency services that have to pick up the pieces when people get into trouble it’s not unreasonable to strongly encourage people to accept their advice. And remember flood water is not nice clean lake water. I am a decent swimmer but there’s no way I’d go through floods just to avoid a night on a bench. Don’t be a statistic, filed under ‘idiots who defied advice’.

    In Sheffield, hundreds of people – including those attending the Christmas Live event, which was cancelled – were kept inside Meadowhall centre by police after the surrounding streets were flooded.

    The centre later reopened but many people chose to stay overnight, after being unable to get home.

    https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-50341846

    They were arranging TAXI’s…. the whole language is bullshit snowflake… unable to get home? What they can’t walk through exhaust high water for 10 miles???

    My principal objection to this is because many of them probably can’t…. somehow we have produced a nation of pathetic capabilities where avoiding some minor discomfort is life threatening. The “Oh… I’ll stay on the beach/sandbar as it’s cut-off by the tide in case my mobile phone gets wet”

    Kids are ferried to school… go to safe organised clubs… grow up and have kids who are ferried to school… etc. to the point it’s a panic if a yr 4 kid walks 1/2 mile home ? There was no need to panic, the kid was sat on the step at home! In my day he would have let himself in and made some food?

    easily
    Member

    stevextc

    I can – and have – walked for miles through waste high flood water. It’s a bit harsh to criticise those who don’t want to do this, though.

    These people were in a shopping centre, probably having driven in. They were not prepared or dressed for wading. They were of various ages. Some of the had kids. It was cold and dark (when I did my wading it was in the tropics). No-one could be sure how bad the flooding was – we’ve all seen floods with cars floating down the water.
    If the police advised me to stay put I’d probably stay put.

    stevextc
    Member

    I can – and have – walked for miles through waste high flood water. It’s a bit harsh to criticise those who don’t want to do this, though.

    These people were in a shopping centre, probably having driven in. They were not prepared or dressed for wading. They were of various ages. Some of the had kids. It was cold and dark (when I did my wading it was in the tropics). No-one could be sure how bad the flooding was – we’ve all seen floods with cars floating down the water.
    If the police advised me to stay put I’d probably stay put.

    I agree it’s a BIT harsh but my initial objection is the BBC wording…

    were kept inside Meadowhall centre by police

    How accurate that is ??? Were they physically detained or just advised?

    Wider though what I see is people avoiding minor discomforts… the times I’ve been at Waterloo station and delays and people unwilling to walk 4-5 miles home reported as “stranded”? Quite a lot of them would normally get home then drive to a gym to go on a treadmill. (People I know)

    I’m not saying everyone should … I’m really just saying “it’s a option”….

    Kids rugby club 10 miles…. why not get a bike? 5 miles why not run?

    Premier Icon butcher
    Subscriber

    These things are not universal. Some people just don’t like football. So I can’t exactly stand over my kids forcing them to kick the ball to and fro, can I? Yes, these things are quite cultural and you need to create the culture from babyhood, however a) by the time you realise how this works it’s too late, b) I don’t play or even watch football myself and c) there’s a large element of personality invovled. Kids are not all the same nor are they copies of their parents.

    I hated football. Still do.

    The whole point is about providing our children with the freedom to make their own activities. They go out to play, and they decide.

    It’s one thing being confined to a handful of activities at selected times throughout the week, but it’s important to remember that not all parents can afford them, or are able to transport their kids there. And it’s the transport that’s one of the main factors keeping the kids confined to the house in the first place, and thus it becomes a vicious circle.

    Kids should be able to wander out the front door and find an appropriate place to kick a ball about, if they wish. Or play hide and seek, British Bulldog, go to the park, or whatever.

    Plus our school is too far away, and my daughter’s only 8.

    Many local schools have closed down, which contributes to the problem, and that is a very modern one. As I say, this is a society of our creation. In 1971, 80% of children between the ages of 7 and 8 made their own way to school, unaccompanied by an adult. In the Netherlands, where they made an active decision to prioritise child safety in their society, I can’t find the official stats just now, but I’m sure they’re still pretty close to that number today.

    stevextc
    Member

    It’s one thing being confined to a handful of activities at selected times throughout the week, but it’s important to remember that not all parents can afford them, or are able to transport their kids there. And it’s the transport that’s one of the main factors keeping the kids confined to the house in the first place, and thus it becomes a vicious circle.

    Kids should be able to wander out the front door and find an appropriate place to kick a ball about, if they wish. Or play hide and seek, British Bulldog, go to the park, or whatever.

    In 1971, 80% of children between the ages of 7 and 8 made their own way to school, unaccompanied by an adult.

    Transport isn’t needed … it’s the mindset that kids can’t just wander out the front door… go to their mates and say “is johnny/jessica playing out”

    My kids school REFUSES to allow 7/8yr olds to walk to school alone they have to be handed over by an adult…. it’s a freakin emergency when one walks home. Year 5 they are “encouraged” to drop kids at the gates …

    Premier Icon molgrips
    Member

    In 1971, 80% of children between the ages of 7 and 8 made their own way to school

    It’s a shame that they allowed you to shop around for school places. This means that council-provided transport is unrealistic for every kid, because they are going to schools all over the city (ours included). When we hit school age there was no primary school within walking distance. There is now but it’s heavily over-subscribed.

    However, even given the above there’s any number of things that could be done. Kids can very easily be bussed around, all it needs is a bit of cash for councils – nothing else. There used to be a bus (which we used) but it took an hour which is a long time for a 6 year old, but it got canned. With more money there could have been more bus routes and it’d have become a 20 minute journey from our neighbourhood, problem solved.

    What we need is a government that takes problems seriously and acts.

    stevextc
    Member

    What we need is a government that takes problems seriously and acts.

    There is a huge step before that though….

    It’s a shame that they allowed you to shop around for school places. This means that council-provided transport is unrealistic for every kid, because they are going to schools all over the city (ours included).

    This only matters for many if we start off with an expectation it’s someone’s job to get our kids to school… which goes a step further back about the idea they need to be accompanied outside the house.

    As far as I remember when I was 7 I was walking home with my 5yr old brother… albeit only a couple of miles… often with other kids .. sometimes not.

    hooli
    Member

    This has all gone a bit when I were a lad/kids don’t know how lucky they are/I used to cycle 50 miles in each direction to school in the snow, uphill in both direction etc…

    Kids rugby club 10 miles…. why not get a bike? 5 miles why not run?

    A 9 year old on his bmx heading down the dual carriageway to play rugby? Yep, perfectly sensible…..

    Premier Icon jam bo
    Subscriber

    This has all gone a bit when I were a lad/kids don’t know how lucky they are/I used to cycle 50 miles in each direction to school in the snow, uphill in both direction etc…

    i read through this and all I could think of was that monty python sketch.

    Premier Icon molgrips
    Member

    5 miles why not run?

    A ten mile run and rugby practice? Your kids may be absolute heroes but that’s a bit too far for mine. Or me tbh.

    As far as I remember when I was 7 I was walking home with my 5yr old brother… albeit only a couple of miles… often with other kids .. sometimes not.

    This is the point – it’s more than a couple of miles for many kids. Still, the situation is solvable with a modest amount of money. Much of which goes back to the city because we need to employ more bus drivers and mechanics and so on.

    Ro5ey
    Member

    Hey you, The Darknesss

    “Monday Football,
    Tuesday Basketball,
    Cricket on a friday night.
    He’s got Cross Country Club on Wednesday
    Cubs on Thursday
    Tag rugby on a friday
    After schooollll”

    A little artist license is used there in my verse and I couldn’t fit in Futsal or another football practise or another basketball practise. Let alone Gymnastics on Saturday or “proper” rugby and football matches on a Sunday morn.

    Costs a fortune!! All because society does not let a nine year old out to play in the park with his pals …. Oh well, what else am I going to spend my hard earned on ??

    Boys are like dogs….. They need daily exercise.

    And here’s the epiphany …. I/we do to !!

    Have fun this weekend …. I’m going to be hungover at basketball practise tomorrow morning … not good !! its sooooo LOUD with 20 odd balls being bounced.

    But double looking forward to Rugby on Sunday. It’s our (I help out a little with coaching) 6th game of full contact and all the boys are doing great with tackling…. It’s my highlight of the week.

    stevextc
    Member

    A ten mile run and rugby practice? Your kids may be absolute heroes but that’s a bit too far for mine. Or me tbh.

    Honestly, not trying to be too 3 yorkshiremen but when I was a kid if I wanted to do something I had to get there mostly on my own. (Not saying parents NEVER EVER took me but that was special occasions)

    Not JUST me…. this is what most of us did…. (I would have cycled but nowhere to keep a bike)… no-one considered it heroic because it was normal….

    Ro5ey:

    All because society does not let a nine year old out to play in the park with his pals …. Oh well, what else am I going to spend my hard earned on ??

    So here’s the weird thing…. we used to just go and play in the park. “I’ll come round your house after school and go to the park” … etc. The park was just kids … occasionally an adult would turn up to retrieve a kid but mostly (overwhelmingly) it was just us kids… “The woods likewise”

    Now society expects/demands I take my kid to the Park which is full of other adults also accompanying their kids…

    In the same way .. there is now some sort of shame attached with “latchkey kids”… and strong guidelines/legal…

    The NSPCC interpretation

    What the law says
    Babies, toddlers and very young children should never be left alone.
    Children under the age of 12 are rarely mature enough to cope in an emergency and should not be left at home alone for a long period of time.
    Children under the age of 16 should not be left alone overnight.

    FFS we were off camping at 13-14 alone…. my 10yr old is more than happy riding alone

    I’d ask – Why aren’t children under 12 mature enough to cope in an emergency (today)?
    and suggest the reason is because they have been mollycoddled…. not because inherently they can’t.

Viewing 15 posts - 41 through 55 (of 55 total)

You must be logged in to reply to this topic.