Brewers of STW

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  • Brewers of STW
  • davidrussell
    Member

    i was wondering about a brew with no bittering hops to see if its a bitter flavour from boiling them, so might just go daft with hops on one brew. the frustrating thing is the lead time to find out its not as good as you hoped 🙁

    j_d any links to the beer line cleaner? i dont know if its relevant but the last few times i’ve used my youngs autosyphon it seems to have introduced bubbles in the syphon (god knows how as its submerged) just wondering if that might be an issue as the beer tastes different between racking to bottling fv and after its carbonated in the bottle (which i’d expect to a degree)

    lots of things to tweak. i am near the williams bros brewery and know someone who works for them so half inclined to send a bottle their way and ask for their opinion on what the off flavour is. i’m certainly not going to be stealing their market share any time soon:)

    davidrussell
    Member

    hey pf- would be good to meet actually, could even combine it with a bike ride if you fancy it. can’t make a brew but can still chuck a leg over 2 wheels 🙂

    its a fair point on beer age, because the stash is kept in the house now i dont think any brew has lasted >1 month really, so it might be too young still. there is a bit of sediment in the bottles but not tons of it. i’m sure i will crack it but i was hoping this brew would have been a bit of a eureka moment, not a urea moment 🙂

    peterfile
    Member

    I always have the issue with my pales David, they taste incredible in the bottling bucket, only to have lost that once carbed up, only for it to turn into a wee cracker a while later. Give it another month and then reevaluate.

    Oxygenation is an issue, but you shouldn’t be picking it up at 11 days.

    Honestly, when I read your posts I feel like it was me writing them a year ago. Gradually every part of your process improves, bit by bit, subtly. Before you know it, your beer has gone from “this is drinkable, but I don’t like it” to “this is pretty darn good!”

    Lots of small improvements and changes and practice and it will get there.

    I was never truly happy with any of my beers until fairly recently, but I’ve currently got 6 different styles bottled up which are just random recipes off the internet and I’m happy with how all of them have turned out. I couldn’t tell you one major thing Im doing differently now that’s led to that, but I could probably list 100 small things I do differently!

    David, if you’ve drank all your batches within a month then Im not surprised you’ve not been happy with them! Seriously, give them time to sort out all the off flavours. I bottle up half a dozen 200ml bottles with every batch. I don’t touch anything for 2 to 3 weeks and then sample a 200ml every week or two until I’m happy it’s ready.

    I’d say I start drinking IPAs from 6 weeks in the bottle, porters 8-12 weeks, stouts at 8-12 weeks.

    Get a pipeline going and you won’t even notice the time passing!

    TheBrick
    Member

    Just bagged up a big pile of hops. Hopefully I will have time to try a batch over christmas.

    john_drummer
    Member

    try here: http://www.morleyhomebrewcentre.com/ucommerce/cleaning-sanitiser/pro-kleen-purple-beer-line-cleaner-5ltr/c-23/c-162/p-1206

    basically a capful or two per gallon of lukewarm water. Let anything that’s going to touch the beer after the boil sit in it for 10-15 minutes, then rinse well as normal. That includes your bottles and caps, siphon tubing, little bottler, spoon for priming sugar etc

    Also, don’t forget the campden tablet per every 5 gallons of brewing liquor.

    finally, +1 for giving the beer time to mature. Mine usually take 2-3 weeks to carbonate & only then do I move them somewhere cool and leave for at least another 3 weeks. Longer = better

    for siphoning I keep it simple: one of these: http://www.morleyhomebrewcentre.com/ucommerce/equipment/bottling-aids/youngs-simple-syphon/c-23/c-231/p-1913 plus one of these to replace the little tap thing: http://www.morleyhomebrewcentre.com/ucommerce/equipment/bottling-aids/automatic-bottling-stick/c-23/c-231/p-1909

    Premier Icon lukedwr
    Subscriber

    PSA…

    I work for a brewery in Hampshire (Bowman Ales), and I currently have several hundred empty 500ml brown bottles that I’m about to throw away. They have our labels on them and need washing, but they are undamaged. They came from a batch of beer that had quality issues.

    I just wondered if anyone wants any of them. I can possibly deliver them in Hampshire/Southampton/ Portsmouth/Chichester/Swinley/ QECP/ Fleet/Andover. (Obviously you don’t have to take all of them, I can do them by the (malt) sackful!

    Either reply on here or to luke.d999 AT gmail.com

    Anyone got a recipe for something easy to drink and ready in 3 weeks from brewing?

    I’ve got a birthday party Nov 15th and was planning on 2 brews. My first (a Black IPA) is going to be in the fermenter for another week, so I can’t do another until then….

    john_drummer
    Member

    3 weeks? unlikely. bottle conditioning takes at least that long, and that’s from fully fermented.

    you could always buy another fermenter, they’re only a tenner. but it won’t get you another brew ready to drink by Nov 15th

    Premier Icon zilog6128
    Subscriber

    Any brew will be ready to drink after 3 weeks. Probably not at it’s best though.

    This was one of the first beers I made purely because of the speed (and the simplicity of the recipe!). It’s a wit (like Hoegaarden) and they tend to be best drunk fresh. It was really good after about 10 days fermenting and then 10 in the bottle. http://www.jimsbeerkit.co.uk/forum/viewtopic.php?f=5&t=38303&sid=cf236497d5a1bdf055d8aa83ed0d7f8f

    john_drummer
    Member

    Any brew will be ready to drink after 3 weeks

    I suppose so

    to be honest mine take 10-14 days just to get through primary fermentation & the bottling bucket, and they need another 2 weeks on top of that for in-bottle carbonation. I guess you could keg it & squirt some CO2 in to force carbonate, that way I guess it could be ready in 3 weeks. but as you say, it wouldn’t be at its best. I’d certainly move the keg to the party location ASAP to allow it time to settle

    Ok, I’m gonna do the standard Wit Beer off of Brewsmith.
    Off to the homebrew place tomorrow and will buy a new fermenter and brew it that day which will give me 4 weeks + 2 days.

    OK Booze Team, some success.
    Doing a simple Wit, using my refractometer and thermapen and (biggest change) a big wide grain bag I just came within 0.0001 g of my target initial gravity.

    Sweet.

    rewski
    Member

    So after years of wanting to brew I’ve done a days brew course at a local brewery, love the mash stage and now my days work is fermenting downstairs, I must admit I’m a bit nervous about the next stage, siphoning and bottling, would be a shame to go and cock this stage up. Any tips greatly appreciated whilst I read through this thorough post. Cheers

    Anyone experimented with adding fruit peel, wondering how pomelo peel would work, I’m getting ahead of myself.

    davidrussell
    Member

    Hey, good luck with the first brew! I discovered the root cause of my siphon working badly at the weekend. I’d put a nylon filter bag over the end of the siphon at the FV and it was causing the siphon mechanism to suck in air around the seal, instead of sucking in the wort. Once i ditched the filter bag it worked like a charm. sadly i’d stirred up the wort a good bit by this time so it was pretty cloudy by the time i got it into the bottling bucket. There was a small amount of splashing too when it started. I took the opportunity to use one of the c02 capsules i got for pressurising my barrel to purge the secondary FV and let it sit for a good few hours to settle.

    so, my top tips would be:

    1. take your time. i used to think any exposure to oxygen was bad, but its not bad enough to warrant you rushing and making a hash of it 🙂
    2. make sure your bottles are spotless – clean throroughly, rinse well and look through them at a bright light – any remaining gunk will be easy to spot.
    3. buy a little bottler, a bottle sanitiser and a good bottle capper. the expense is worth it!

    good luck!

    rewski
    Member

    Thanks David, that’s reassuring advice.

    I’m due to bottle Sunday, would it hurt if I left a day or two? Fermentation has slowed down a lot so I think it’s ready.

    Fruit Peel

    Yes, Done it with the remains of pressed oranged froma juice factory.
    Blanched them with hot water to pastuerize and kill off wild yeasts , then left in a CT for a week after primary . Used approx 100gm/gall iirc.

    Leaving it an eaxtra day wont make a jot of difference imo , probably be better , just remember to do 3-4 pet pop bottles and leave them in the airing cupboard . will let you know aboyt conditioning levels quicker and if you need to warm or cold hold your bottles

    The Wit beer I made needed orange peel.
    I got some (from Curacao oranges) from the home brew store. Came as hard little dark things, not like orange peel at all.

    Dunno if it’s going to be ready in time for my party though. Not quite ready to bottle yet and it’s two weeks on Saturday. Hopefully I can bottle at the weekend. Got 6 SGs to drop by then

    Premier Icon Clobber
    Subscriber

    @Peterfile

    Since increasing the size of your stockpot have you increased the volume of water that you mash with to a nearer full volume BIAB?

    Premier Icon zilog6128
    Subscriber

    I’m due to bottle Sunday, would it hurt if I left a day or two? Fermentation has slowed down a lot so I think it’s ready.

    I have had a lazy couple of months brewing-wise i.e. have done nothing! Finally got around to doing my Christmas brew yesterday (a nice porter that I’ve done before but with a Christmas pudding in the FV!).

    I also bottled the beer which had been in primary for 2 months. I was pretty apprehensive as I’d heard when the yeasties run out of sugar they basically cannibalise each other and the resulting by-products do not taste nice. However I’ve also heard that with small-scale brewing (I only do 10L at a time) you can get away with more for some reason (e.g. virtually impossible to over pitch).

    Anyway the beer (a Belgian blonde) tasted amazing straight out of the FV, probably one of my best so far – really smooth flavour already and no off-flavours that you sometimes get in a “young” beer. It made me think that regarding conditioning the beer, maybe time on the greater volume of yeast in the FV is worth more than time in the bottle. Thoughts?

    peterfile
    Member

    Since increasing the size of your stockpot have you increased the volume of water that you mash with to a nearer full volume BIAB?

    The main reason I increased the size of stockpot was so that I could do a full volume BIAB, and also to ensure I was getting a full 10l into the fermenter. I now don’t need to dunk sparge or top up the boil volume, I’m still hitting 70% efficiency and I’ve obviously got one less step to do 🙂

    I’ve been putting together some drawings for a recirculating mash BIAB set up. But getting all the parts I need is coming in at around £500 (including chiller etc). After a chat with NZCol today, he’s put me on to a prebuilt unit that’s designed almost exactly the same way, but obviously avoids the need for me to faff about with metalwork and electricity (which I was half looking forward, but half dreading). Even better, it costs the same as my proposed DIY build!

    I’m still brewing every two weeks (which is actually slow down since I’ve now got limited space in my fermentation fridge), but reckon I must have brewed more than 30 batches now.

    Latest has been a Chocolate Oatmeal Stout which I added 100% Madagascan black cacao to the boil, then soaked some cacao nibs in dark rum and added them to secondary. I’ve just bottled it and will leave for a few months before getting stuck in.

    I thought a while back that some of my pales were being limited by the quality of the hops I was picking up. The state of the hops on opening the packets was so hit or miss. So after a few chats with guys from a local homebrew club I was put on to a US company called Nikobrew that nitrogen flushes their hops at packaging and have a reputation for selling some of the best hops in the US.

    I bought 1.5kg of mixed (expensive variety) hops in little 50g packs (which is perfect!) for £70 including shipping to the UK. So that’s £4.60 per 100g including shipping…which is cheaper than what I currently pick up hops for here! I just finished a brew with them on Wednesday and I honestly cannot emphasise enough how incredible they smelled. “Dank” would be a good word to use. Really really looking forward to tasting the finished product.

    I’ve also started buying milled to order grain from Malt Miller. Which again, surprisingly, works out cheaper than the run of the mill (sorry) pre-packed stuff.

    Other developments have been the purchase of a PH meter (which hasn’t arrived yet), since I’ve done so much work around water chemistry that it seems odd to be blindly accepting the calculations as being correct. The little PH strips I’ve been using are absolutely rubbish 🙂

    I entered half a dozen random beers I had lying around into the UKNHBC to see if the judges would pick up any off flavours that I wasn’t. Surprisingly, all the beers did pretty well (within the “very good” category) and the majority of marks I lost was down to being out of style (eg using Australian hops in American Pales etc) rather than for flavour/aroma/body/off flavours etc. So pretty encouraging all round.

    Next up is trying to find a 20-25 litre fermenter that will fit my fermentation fridge so that I can brew a larger volume without having to change the FF. Once I find the fermenter, I can start building a draught beer set up…which means I can drop bottling the beer!

    Premier Icon Clobber
    Subscriber

    Ha! We seem to be heading down the same path, albeit I’m somewhat behind you…

    I was looking at building a braumeister style thing but the grainfather (I assume you’re talking about) seems to fit the bill. Although I do wonder how long the 2kW element will take to heat the water.

    I really want to go 60L brew length though so I may end up with my design yet…

    I brewed this http://www.insidebeer.com/articles/20100527 at the weekend, hopefully it’ll turn out alright, was an amazing colour.

    Think I might try the full volume BIAB if you’re hitting 70% with it, seems like it’s not worth doing anymore faff if it’s working for you and you’re hitting your volumes into fermentor.

    Great tip on Nikobrew, thanks for that. Also if you tell Rob the Maltmiller that the grain is for BIAB he does a slightly different crush for you. I think there is a notes thing during checkout.

    Very well done on your results at the beer marking, I need to sort a few things out prior to attempting that, like water treatment and temp control on the fermenting cupboard.

    We should do a recipe share, are you using beer engine?

    EDIT: Perhaps we can do a joint order to Nikobrew at some point if it saves costs

    peterfile
    Member

    We do indeed seem to be heading in the same direction clobber! Yeah, it was the Grainfather that Col was telling me about. He’s got one arriving imminently from NZ.

    Part of me wants to do the DIY build because it’s good experience, but the other part says just spend the same amount and buy a proper one! Re the 2kw element…probably wouldn’t be too much of a job to drill a hole and stick in another 2kw element to use when bringing up to temp? Would need to plug it into a different ring main though.

    That imperial stout looks nice. I brewed a RIS last year, but at that time a few of my processes were a bit loose and I oxygenated the wort when bottling, which meant that the beer turned a bit grim before it had the chance to fully mature.

    I’m keen to keep brew length fairly short at the moment, simply because it means I get to brew more often. Honestly, even if I had to throw away all my beer once it was ready, I’d still brew as a hobby! The fact that I get a case of “free” beer at the end is just a major bonus.

    Cheers for the tip on malt miller. I honestly can’t recommend Nikobrew enough. I’ll let you know what the taste verdict is in a few weeks, but based on aroma alone they are in a different league to the stuff I’ve been getting a hold of.

    I’d definitely recommend picking up a 19l pot and doing a full volume mash, it’s just so much easier, quicker and cleaner. Also, whilst the mash is almost at the top of the pot, it means that you’ve got loads of headroom for the boil (rather than the massive brewery inch, which is prone to boil over).

    I use beersmith, but most of my recipes are now on paper records, since I find it easier to take detailed notes during the brew and to reference back to. I could scan some of them in and email over.

    Have you seen the Synek? Very tempted by one of these. You fill up 8 pint (I think) bags with your beer and they keep for yonks. Then, whenever you fancy a particular beer, you drop that bag into the unit and dispense as normal. Seems like a nice and small kegerator unit. Just keep the filled bags in a cool place/fridge until you need them. Apparently the beer lasts 30 days even once you’ve poured the first pint.

    EDIT: Perhaps we can do a joint order to Nikobrew at some point if it saves costs

    Definitely up for that…although I’ve currently got enough for somewhere between 15-25 brews so might not be for a while! Although, I’ll probably be bored of Citra, Cascade, Centennial, Amarillo and Galaxy by then, so maybe we could do a swap of a few.

    davidrussell
    Member

    EDIT: Perhaps we can do a joint order to Nikobrew at some point if it saves costs
    Definitely up for that…although I’ve currently got enough for somewhere between 15-25 brews so might not be for a while! Although, I’ll probably be bored of Citra, Cascade, Centennial, Amarillo and Galaxy by then, so maybe we could do a swap of a few.

    i’d be up for a hops group buy too. I’ve been getting my hops from Brewuk and they seemed fine, but i’m not experienced enough to know if they are great.

    i’ve just ordered a custom BIAB bag as i was sick of the one i had not quite fitting properly, and i think i’ll ask for the water treatment for Christmas, 2015 with be the rise of Potters brewery!

    Incidentally what do you call your brewhouse? I called mine Potters because the magic happens in the cupboard under the stairs. More like David blaine at the moment to be fair – stuff hangs around in there and doesn’t do much for a couple of weeks and it smells a bit funny when you let it out 😉

    peterfile
    Member

    Just looking at Nikobrew’s site, they have a flat rate of $25 on international shipping up to 3.5-4 lbs. Probably wouldn’t save much doing a group buy and will increase risk since it’s uninsured (I’d rather 1.5kg of hops went missing than 4.5kg!). Plus we’d also have the time/cost/hassle of splitting and posting on the hops to the others once they arrived in the UK.

    I’ve not got a name for mine david, but quite like the sound of the Whistling Nostril 😉

    Brewuk’s hops are decent, but just wait until you open a pack of Nikobrew’s stuff! I sat smelling the empty pack throughout the boil last week hahah!

    rewski
    Member

    The guy I did my day brew course with has just opened an online brew shop, not bought anything yet but I will in due course. I’m going to try my bottle conditioned pale ale at the weekend, feeling strangely nervous.

    http://home-brew-depot.myshopify.com/

    peterfile – thanks for all the useful info, this thread is my second favourite on STW, first is the Tripster ATR 😀

    Premier Icon Clobber
    Subscriber

    Yeah, Peter, you’ve been very good at sharing your info on here! Thanks!

    That synek looks great but pricey! with respect to smaller batches you’ve obviously not told your friends about your brewin, when one of mine is ready they all pile over and it’s gone before I know it hence the longer brew length…

    I also want to be able to do a decent size batch for special occasions etc..

    Premier Icon NZCol
    Subscriber

    Careful, i started with 40 then 60 then 100 then 1500 litres – slippery slope 😉

    Premier Icon Clobber
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    how many grainfathers can you bring in then Col?

    davidrussell
    Member

    Just popped a brew i bottled back in early sept, so about 9 weeks in the bottle. Its definitely benefited from more time in the bottle, the off flavours are definitely reduced and the aroma and bitterness are actually mellowed. carbonation, colour and clarity is pretty good too. actually enjoying it, although its not perfect. Fired me up a bit for a brew at the weekend though! I have 100g each of east kent goldings and centennial and plenty of MO. i’m thinking a smash with centennial? I’d like to do something with a hop overload at the end, keep the bitterness down to make sure its not one of the flavours i’m getting.

    as a final note i’d echo the thoughts above too. this is one of my favourite threads on here and the generosity of knowledge, advice and good natured banter is great. Some of the threads on here could do with following this example.

    Maybe what you perceive to be off flavours are just normal flavours produced during fermentation that havent reduced to a low level. Diacetyl is noticable at tiny amounts, DMS at higher levels can guve green beer a skanky nose .
    Then there are vicinal diketones (sp) that can make you think your beer is made up of vegetables.

    Centenial is a great hop ,try a load in a muslin bag in the FV maybe?

    peterfile
    Member

    Good stuff david, glad to see the patience paid off! 🙂

    Go for around 100g of hops at 20/10/0 mins…loads of aroma flavour and a nice, rounded bitterness. Play around with beersmith, but you should still hit around 40-50 IBUs just using bucket loads of late additions. Have a read at this on Mr Malty. I rarely do 60 min additions anymore.

    Also, +1 for liking this thread…definitely one of my favourites on here.

    davidrussell
    Member

    quite possibly singletrackmind, i’m just not sure what i was smelling / tasting to start with as i couldn’t put my finger on it!

    i’m going to seek out some experienced brewers (i have a line into a commercial brewer) and get their honest opinion on it. i know PF is reasonably local to me (central Scotland) so anyone else local? we could meet for a bike ride somewhere and have a wee tasting session mid ride? might not be conducive to shralping the gnar afterwards though…

    rewski
    Member

    I’ve tried two bottles of my first batch after 10 days bottle conditioned today, on the whole it’s not bad, it’s a little tangy almost acidic but has a good nose, I wondered at the time whether I used enough sugar, I was being cautious. I also wondered whether my garage was too cold for storage. I’m going to leave it alone for a few more weeks to see what happens.

    durhambiker
    Member

    Cracking thread, just spent a while reading through from the beginning. Last Christmas when we were all a bit skint the entire family gave each other stuff they had but didn’t use as gifts, and I ended up with the brother-in-law’s homebrew stuff. So far only got as far as doing a couple of brews of the same kit (Wilko’s Meixcan Cerveza) but I’m keen on having a go at BIAB. So after being inspired by this thread I’m going to put a bit of a shopping list together and wait for my Christmas tips to roll in at work and get everything I need to make a start

    peterfile
    Member

    I’m keen on having a go at BIAB. So after being inspired by this thread I’m going to put a bit of a shopping list together and wait for my Christmas tips to roll in at work and get everything I need to make a start

    Do it! Great time of year to start too (you can brew on days when the weather doesn’t warrant going for a ride and less worry of fermentation temps getting out of hand).

    I’m not sure what kit you’ve got already, but Bazz posted a link to this deal the other day on here. Quite frankly, it’s an absolute bargain! I’d be impressed if you could put together a similar package for less.

    My PH meter arrived the other day, along with some buffer solution. I’ve been playing with it over the last few days to see how well it holds after calibration. Initial impressions are excellent. I’m getting accuracy of 0.01 to 0.02! Considering I only need to be accurate to 0.1, it’s good news.

    Will be interesting to see how far out my water chemistry adjustments are. The beer has been tasting much better since the tweaks, but I suppose I won’t know what I’m actually hitting until I test it. Quite excited.

    I’m very close to pre ordering one of those Grainfathers. The only thing holding me back is a potential house move, which would mean a dedicated space for brewing and the ability to custom build something. Then again, due to the limited availability I’m pretty sure I could shift the Grainfather with ease if it’s no longer needed.

    peterfile
    Member

    Used my pH meter for the first time last night (it’s an Extech PH100, which seems to be a good balance of price and accuracy for brewing).

    I was actually a bit nervous when I drew a sample from the mash, since I’ve invested quite a bit of time learning about the water chemistry side of things (mostly because I find it interesting), and didn’t want to find out I was way off the mark.

    Brewed an IPA i’ve brewed before and was shooting for a mash pH of 5.4. By either good science or sheer fluke, I hit 5.41! I’d have been happy anywhere between 5.3-5.5, so really pleased.

    I suppose it’s also confirmed that the £18 spent on water analysis and initial treatment recommendations from Murphy’s was well worth it too. Given that my mash additions were designed to bring down the pH, I wonder what it would have been sitting at if I’d left the water untreated?

    I’ve noticed a big difference in my pales since fixing my water. They were tasty before, but felt a little one dimensional and the hops always seemed muted, regardless of how much I used. Now I feel like the hops are clearer and have a bit more zing to them, more defined.

    I’d definitely recommend Murphy’s water testing and treatment recommendation service. I emailed the lab a few times afterwards with questions about my report and help with styles and they were always prompt and helpful with their responses. A bargain at £18 IMO if you fancy tinkering with your water.

    chambord
    Member

    Don’t want to start a new thread so I’ll stick this here:

    I’m looking for a brewing heat belt for a 25L fermenting bucket – can anyone recommend a good one?

    Also are lagers normally hopped? – The belt is a gift for someone who has just started brewing (lager) and is using the tins, however so far they haven’t had much luck. I wonder whether I could buy him some posh hops to stick in to improve flavour a bit?

    Cheers brew boffins of STW

    john_drummer
    Member

    I wouldn’t recommend one to be honest

    a) the heat is too close to localised portions of the brew
    b) there’s little to no control
    and
    c) lager yeasts prefer lower temperatures anyway. better to ferment lower, slower for lager. Lager yeast prefers temperatures below 18deg, ideally 12-15. If you ferment at too high a temperature, there’s a risk of all sorts of odd flavours being introduced.

    Hops are used in lagers, yes. Often Saaz, Tettnang, Hallertauer etc. But if your friend is brewing from kits, there will be hops already in there; you don’t want to be adding late / dry hops to lagers, that’s more of an ale trick, particularly hoppy ales such as IPAs or American Pale Ales.

    Do you know what brand of kits? some will give better results than others. e.g. Hambleton Bard & Coopers kits will give better results than Geordie or John Bull, for example.
    Better to change the fermentables – if currently using common or garden sugar, switch to brewer’s sugar, or better still, spraymalt (dried malt extract).

    Premier Icon Clobber
    Subscriber

    The main reason I increased the size of stockpot was so that I could do a full volume BIAB, and also to ensure I was getting a full 10l into the fermenter. I now don’t need to dunk sparge or top up the boil volume, I’m still hitting 70% efficiency and I’ve obviously got one less step to do

    GREAT CALL! Just brewed like this, hitting over 70% with it also. Won’t muck about again!

    Bigger pot and full volume biab FTW!

    peterfile
    Member

    Bigger pot and full volume biab FTW!

    Aye, it certainly makes the whole process a lot easier! 🙂

    Also, the 19 litre pot still fits comfortably into my fan oven, so I’m still able to hold mash temps within 0.5 degrees.

    I just bottled an IPA that I’ve brewed before, but this time I used fresh malt and those uber tasty Nikobrew hops. Took a sample when i bottles (obviously!) and it was delicious. Can’t wait for it to carb up!

    This was also the first beer I’ve cold crashed. I crashed for 72 hours to drop all of the pellets out of suspension that I threw in for dry hopping. Worked very well, it all formed a nice tight layer on the bottom on the FV.

    hey all, been a wee while since i posted on here previously (my forum name has changed due to going premier, but not too hard to reconcile who i was 🙂 ) hope you are all well.

    I haven’t brewed for a couple of months sadly.My last creation was a citra double IPA which is quite potent and worked out reasonably well, but the hop burst isn’t really shining through. I almost get a note of pine from the Citra hops, but its quite subtle – not unpleasant though.

    the thread on the front page reminded me to post here. Thanks to a very generous Christmas present from the GLW I’m off to Stewart brewing in Edinburgh this weekend to brew with them for the day. Quite excited about it actually, i think we have a consultation to decide what to brew, then get on and create something. Go back in 3 weeks time to bottle. I can’t wait to get a professional perspective on my skills and hopefully pick up some tips. i’m planning to take one of my bottles along to get their view on it too, so i’ll let you all know how it goes!

    This was also the first beer I’ve cold crashed. I crashed for 72 hours to drop all of the pellets out of suspension that I threw in for dry hopping. Worked very well, it all formed a nice tight layer on the bottom on the FV.

    what temp did you cold crash at PF? 5-6 degrees?

    I think I’ll upgrade to a bigger pot.
    Just re-done my kitchen and put in an induction hob, the Massive Brewery pot is lacking in ferrous metals and doesn’t work on it unfortunately.

    That eBay 19 litre one looks OK, stainless steel.

    Also looks like I’m having to change the central heating system in my flat. While an annoying expense, the upside is that it frees up a big cupboard after we remove the old water tanks.

    While I may make it into a sauna, I may also use it as a brewery!

    peterfile
    Member

    Thanks to a very generous Christmas present from the GLW I’m off to Stewart brewing in Edinburgh this weekend to brew with them for the day. Quite excited about it actually, i think we have a consultation to decide what to brew, then get on and create something. Go back in 3 weeks time to bottle. I can’t wait to get a professional perspective on my skills and hopefully pick up some tips. i’m planning to take one of my bottles along to get their view on it too, so i’ll let you all know how it goes!

    That sounds fantastic david! Take some pictures!

    what temp did you cold crash at PF? 5-6 degrees?

    Whatever temperature my kitchen fridge sits at 🙂 I think it’s about 4 degrees!

    I’ve just bottled a hoppy amber. I brewed the amber a while back and loved it, but the thing that struck me at the time was how good it would be with a nice session type hoppy amber. Can’t wait to try it.

    I’ve actually not brewed in a month or so (longest for a while!). Might try to rectify that tomorrow!

    Premier Icon Garry_Lager
    Subscriber

    Back on the brew here after some months off – can anyone recommend a good stout BIAB recipe?
    I’m not a huge stout drinker tbh, but it would make a nice change from the usual IPA stuff I do. Am I right in thinking that you still use a predominant pale malt base for stout?

    peterfile
    Member

    I’ve got belter of an oatmeal stout, great for using up ingredients too!…

    This is for 10 litres, so adjust accordingly

    1800g pale
    500g flaked oats
    175g British caramalt
    140g roasted barley
    135g chocolate malt
    115g carapils
    60g black malt
    60g flaked barley

    18g northern brewer @ 60 mins
    16g cluster @ 15 mins

    67 degree mash.

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