Boost. Or not to boost ….

Home Forum Bike Forum Boost. Or not to boost ….

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  • Boost. Or not to boost ….
  • Premier Icon scotroutes
    Subscriber

    Boost.

    It’s the way of the future.

    stumpy01
    Member

    Boost, you say….?!
    Most definitely yes!

    [Img]http://www.theconstructionindex.co.uk/assets/news_articles/2012/11/1354085202_cadburys-boost.jpg[/Img]

    P-Jay
    Member

    Boost, OE has gone boost which pretty much curtains for non-boost.

    fifeandy
    Member

    Or wait till next year for BoostMax™

    I’m going to wait for BoostMinus

    Premier Icon matt_outandabout
    Subscriber

    If 2018 is boostmax, 2019 is boostlite…

    mrmoofo
    Member

    Go one the, what is boost going to do for me?
    And do I need a new front hub ( as this will only affect the front), or a new wheel …
    Someone has said you can get spacers and re-dish the wheel. But how will the spacing for disc brakes work???

    Rickos
    Member

    Go one the, what is boost going to do for me?

    Nothing other than keep you up to date before your second hand kit loses all its value.

    Premier Icon nickdavies
    Subscriber

    Go one the, what is boost going to do for me

    Nothing. It’ll just mean you can buy another pair of pikes as they aren’t making non boost any more. Or possibly if you need to warranty them in 18 months.

    Of course irrelevant when boost max, minus, and 26 & 7/8ths” render boost obsolete in 2 years…

    mrmoofo
    Member

    Re warranty …. are Pikes “challenging”?

    poah
    Member

    Non boost and coil it if you are going for a pike.

    Boost is an over marketed, incremental gain in wheel strength acheived by making hub flange spacing wider, thus improving the spoke angle against side forces.

    I’d only go to boost on a new frame or fork. Certainly not worth it just to have it.

    Premier Icon Rubber_Buccaneer
    Subscriber

    Someone has said you can get spacers

    Hope make kits to make your 100mm hub boost 110. Brake side stays where it is, drive side is 10mm wider cap and you need to dish the wheel to compensate. Small bonus is a more even triangle for your spokes but it’s a pretty marginal benefit, the bigger benefit is not buying a new hub yet but still having boost forks that may or may not be more future proof

    Premier Icon Rubber_Buccaneer
    Subscriber

    Oh yeah, if the fork takes torque caps make sure to get the right Hope adapter kit, it will improve your life 😀

    Premier Icon howsyourdad1
    Subscriber

    What about at the rear? I’m looking at discounted 2017 Transition frames that are all 142…. I presume they will be boosted for 2018

    Premier Icon Rubber_Buccaneer
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    poah – Member
    Non boost and coil it if you are going for a pike

    Pretty rough to butcher a new fork like that but I agree about the coil if it’s a 2017 or earlier Pike. CRC had good deals on Lyriks (better air spring) especially if you have a BC discount

    Non boost and coil it if you are going for a pike.

    Coil. Hmmm…

    I’d love to do a blind test on the coil shouters, to see if they actually can tell the difference.

    Premier Icon Rubber_Buccaneer
    Subscriber

    I have an air sprung and a coil Pike so pop around if you want to feel the difference. Blind testing MTBs is hazardous though 😀

    I’m no suspension expert but I’m very confident I’d know which was which by feel alone, it is quite distinct

    poah
    Member

    I went for a mattoc with the IRT chamber. Been better than the pike I had with a luftkappe. Had the pike not had bushing issues I would have coiled it

    mjsmke
    Member

    Boost? Wait for ‘Yorkie Man Sized’.

    mrmoofo
    Member

    I am about to buy some Pikes. Using a current hope hub, I would have to go non boost. Or I go boost …. price of the forks isn’t hugely different. But it would mean a new front wheel ( I assume)
    Is it worth it?
    Thanks ….

    oldtalent
    Member

    Boost can F right off. 150mm so you could whack in a set of dh wheels for an uplift day? Nah lets make it 148mm.

    piemonster
    Member

    I’ve just acquired both boost and non boost forks.

    One came with a new bike, one (cheap rigid forks tbf) came for an existing bike. Buy what suits best and with one eye on possible/probable redundancy and how long you expect to be using the parts in question.

    I went boost with the new bike not because it was the future, but because thats what the bike from the model range that allowed the options I wanted (27.5/27.5+/29er) came with, apparently the 29er version I was looking at couldn’t do 27.5+.

    So long as I get 3 to 5 years use out of the platform I’m fine with it. And I’m yet to struggle finding a bog standard old school QR rear hub.

    It really doesn’t matter one bit. Just got for the fork that you can get the best deal on. If it is a boost fork then use the spacer kit or the front wheel boostinator kit. Simple.

    Premier Icon deadkenny
    Subscriber

    Rubber_Buccaneer – Member 
    Hope make kits to make your 100mm hub boost 110. Brake side stays where it is, drive side is 10mm wider cap and you need to dish the wheel to compensate.

    MRP do a kit that doesn’t need dishing. Provides an adapter to push the disc out and longer end caps. Designed for DT Swiss though and 6 bolt hubs. https://www.pinkbike.com/news/mrp-boost-adapter-kit-for-dt-swiss-wheels.html

    Premier Icon chakaping
    Subscriber

    Is the fork going to stay with the bike or move on to your next build?

    sirromj
    Member

    I went non-boost on my hardtail as I want the trails to come alive.

    Premier Icon cookeaa
    Subscriber

    Hope make kits to make your 100mm hub boost 110. Brake side stays where it is, drive side is 10mm wider cap and you need to dish the wheel to compensate. Small bonus is a more even triangle for your spokes but it’s a pretty marginal benefit, the bigger benefit is not buying a new hub yet but still having boost forks that may or may not be more future proof

    That’s a crap solution, why not simply space either end +5mm and space the rotor outboard? No need to go re-dishing/rebuilding wheels…

    TBH if I was in the position to choose right now, I would buy a boost fork and worry about adapting or replacing the hub/wheel as a matter of “future proofing”.

    But if you’ve no pressing need to be bang up to date, and would rather save a few quid now I can’t imagine 15x100mm hubs vanishing from the shops overnight, plus aftermarket boost hubs still seem a little thin on the ground and slightly pricier…

    The tactic is more to push boost forks into the OE market and make the customers follow along…

    What about at the rear? I’m looking at discounted 2017 Transition frames that are all 142…. I presume they will be boosted for 2018

    This is another good point, I am in a similar position, trying to choose between possible 142mm 29er frames or 148mm 27+/29″ compatible.
    For now I am choosing to put the hub standards to one side and compare frames on their other attributes… But it’s hard to say longer term if “boost” will become the dominant industry standard for most MTB frames or if 142mm will be retained and used as another sub division of the market…

    Premier Icon Rubber_Buccaneer
    Subscriber

    That’s a crap solution, why not simply space either end +5mm and space the rotor outboard? No need to go re-dishing/rebuilding wheels…

    I prefer re-dishing rather than spacing out the rotor, personal preference I suppose. Helps that I have a wheel jig etc

    Premier Icon deadkenny
    Subscriber

    But it’s hard to say longer term if “boost” will become the dominant industry standard for most MTB frames or if 142mm will be retained and used as another sub division of the market…

    There’s no industry standard, just the next standard to obsolete what you’ve got. Without this the industry would probably die as there’s nothing new to sell. Not that I like changing standards.

    Still, retrobiking is very much a thing and old stuff can still be found long after they are supposedly dead. Hence I’m keeping my 26ers going along with 27.5. Not got boost yet and have zero intention to as it offers no benefit whatsoever for me. I’ll end up with it though due to new frame designs, much as I ended up with a 27.5 (though the wheel size offers little to me, but the geometry and long wheel base does make a big difference).

    Premier Icon benpinnick
    Subscriber

    Boost can F right off. 150mm so you could whack in a set of dh wheels for an uplift day? Nah lets make it 148mm.

    It would need to be 157 for that to work. All your discs and gears n stuff would be in the wrong place.

    But it’s hard to say longer term if “boost” will become the dominant industry standard for most MTB frames or if 142mm will be retained and used as another sub division of the market…

    Boost is definitely already the dominant standard.

    mrmoofo
    Member

    If I want to use the hub I have, use a 10 mm space on the none disc side and then re dish wheel? Or two 5 mm spacers each side and shim out the disc brake rotor ?

    Premier Icon benpinnick
    Subscriber

    On a hope your best option is to get the 110 adaptor Torque caps – then re-dish the wheel.

    Premier Icon cookeaa
    Subscriber

    Boost is definitely already the dominant standard.

    Really?

    I was under the impression it’s more prevalent on newer high price point bikes still…

    TBH I had envisaged it being used to differentiate either between “higher” and “lower” spec bikes or to help separate the more XC/marathon type bikes from Gnarr/plus/DH types down the line…

    Anything that prevents parts being migrated between bikes easily and therefore deters the upgraders and self-builders helps drive new bike sales…

    Premier Icon benpinnick
    Subscriber

    Well of course there’s still 135 QR, and by numbers thats always going to be the main standard, but if you’re talking bolt through, I doubt you’ll find that many 142 bikes on sale beyond 2018.

    mrmoofo
    Member

    2017 boost vs 2018 non boost …
    What is best ?

    Premier Icon benpinnick
    Subscriber

    Theres no such thing as 2018 Non boost pikes… so what fork?

    mrmoofo
    Member

    Okay … goes off to check Crc …

    chopchop
    Member

    I re dished a Hope/flow wheel to fit my new boost forks, it’s pretty easy and can be done with the wheel fitted to the fork so you don’t need any extra kit apart from a spoke key. I followed some instructions I found online, take your time and be methodical about it.

    Premier Icon Rubber_Buccaneer
    Subscriber

    Okay … goes off to check Crc …

    Beware, CRC have Pikes labeled as 2018 that are not. Think it even gets a mention in the questions.

    Premier Icon benpinnick
    Subscriber

    In a fight off between 2018 and 2017 forks, I would say you’d be wanting to save at least £100 on the 2017 forks over 2018 before its even worth considering, the inconvenience of boost if you have non-boost wheels aside.

    mrmoofo
    Member

    Thanks … that clears that up

    oldnpastit
    Member

    Can any ordinary person tell the difference between boost and regular?

    Premier Icon scotroutes
    Subscriber

    Me.

    I can’t run a 3″ rear tyre on a 2x gear system without it.

    Premier Icon benpinnick
    Subscriber

    Can any ordinary person tell the difference between boost and regular?

    No. At least not when comparing like for like tyres. I can honestly say that boost is offering not a lot, with the exception of providing extra tyre clearance. It does marginally improve your wheels, but realistically are you likely to be the 1 in 1000 person that doesn’t taco their wheel due to the small improvement in strength boost offers over non boost? Probably not. But remember its only 3mm of extra tyre clearance, so that in itself isn’t exactly awesome. Its not delivering your 3″ tyre clearance on a 2x drivetrain. Boost only made a 4% difference in that equation. That’s delivered by the availability of 3″ tyres and the person designing the bike making it work with them. 1x specific bikes offer far more of the real advantages touted about boost than boost itself. However as a british bike co. we’ll take that 3mm on our FS bikes to improve drive side mud clearance! It all adds up.

    All that said, its not a bad thing. Its basically just someone asking how big can we go before things like heel rub get too annoying. 148 (for whatever reason) was the number settled on, and so that became boost. It actually makes sense in many engineering ways in relation to being able to widen pivots etc., just not many that really correlate to the marketing nonsense.

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