bollocks tits and arse and peacocks on the roof!

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  • bollocks tits and arse and peacocks on the roof!
  • yunki
    Member

    Why does my garmin edge 500 insist that my house is 67m below sea level!?

    I know that I can set up a fixed known altitude, but it would really help if the bloody machine could tell me what that should be!
    Any advice?

    steve_b77
    Member

    Search on google for the altitude at your house / street and then set that on the Garmin.

    Thats what I did with my 800

    dantsw13
    Member

    Or take it to the beach, and enter zero!! 😀

    brakes
    Member

    Any advice?

    eat yellow snow.

    Premier Icon binners
    Subscriber

    Yunki earlier….

    Peacocks on the roof and your under water……yeh right!

    yunki
    Member

    Sussed it.. Heavens above.com is a cracking site for getting your altitude

    brakes
    Member

    I am currently at 17m above sea level

    ndthornton
    Member

    Why does my garmin edge 500 insist that my house is 67m below sea level!

    I imagine its either……

    A, not got a very good signal right now (although if its accuracy is this far out it shouldn’t report your elevation at all – see option c)

    B, broken

    C, a rubbish device

    D, 67m below sea level

    If its D its a blooming amazing device as GPS doesn’t penetrate water or Earth.

    Premier Icon ddmonkey
    Subscriber

    “bollocks tits and arse and peacocks on the roof”

    Sounds like a great party even if it is 67m below sea level.

    scottfitz
    Member

    Or take it to the beach, and enter zero!!

    At high tide or low tide?

    dantsw13
    Member

    Get a tide table and work it out, or try somewhere non tidal like the med!

    Rogan Josh
    Member

    What size wheels?

    Premier Icon jam bo
    Subscriber

    D, 67m below sea level

    If its D its a blooming amazing device as GPS doesn’t penetrate water or Earth.

    http://geology.com/below-sea-level/

    plenty of places in the world you can be more than 67m below sea level and get GPS.

    just not newton abbott…

    Premier Icon granny_ring
    Subscriber

    What size wheels?

    650 of course.

    Freester
    Member

    The 500 uses a pressure sensor so you need to ‘calibrate’ it.

    On the settings is an ‘Elevation Point’. Basically you plug in the altitude at known spots, usually your house and other places you start rides.

    Loads of websites /apps can give you an accurate (ish) elevation at a known sport. Get your home elevation plugged in to your garmin!

    Cheers

    Freester
    Member

    Oh and after reading the OP properly –

    I use an app called “Get Altitude” on my Android phone to erm get the altitude. It’s just a google map where you point and hold on the point you want the altitude and it displays it. That’s the elevation I plug into my Garmin. Simples.

    mduncombe
    Member

    err, isn’t the easiest way by just looking at an OS map? Trickier in a town or city admittedly. But as bing maps has 1:50 and 1:25k you might be Ok. or if you have mapping software such as memory map or basecamp its really easy.

    GPS will get your altitude from one of three sources

    GPS, not very accurate as the geometry of GPS satellites is not conducive to accurate vertical positioning. the worse the view of the sky the worse the fewer satellites you can see, which means worse geometry and therefore less accurate height data. think +- 50 meters for GPS altitude.

    Air pressure which varies constantly, those with ABC watched such as mountaineers will be familiar with manually setting your elevation when ever you reach a feature with a known height (calibration). think +- 10 meters depending on how recently you calibrated. Can be used as a powerful navigation technique in conjunction with a map as knowing your height on a mountain side will narrow down the number of places you might actually be.

    From a loaded map or height database file. totally dependant on how good the data is.

    Sea level in the UK can vary throughout the course of a day by up to 12 meters BTW, depending on location.

    so if elevation is really important to you, set your altimeter manually based on the height a known location (ride start) referenced to a map and do it often, how often depends on the weather and how much faff you can put up with. But I suspect its not that important to most people.

    Premier Icon Del
    Subscriber

    just not newton abbott…

    quite a few might wish ‘Downtown NA’ was 67m under water. 😉

    yunki
    Member

    ok.. I’m working on the calibration thing..

    I went down to the sea shore this evening after setting my home elevation.. to discover that I was 90 someting metres below sea level at the high tide mark 🙁

    I set another elevation point, and I’m gonna hit a few trig points next outing to see if that helps

    Freester
    Member

    So the thing is. These points need to be within 30 meters of when you ride by it on a route you are logging.

    Which is why what you really want to do is just set an elevation point say ‘home’, or ‘trail centre’ or wherever you normally start a ride and then it will automatically correct every time you start a ride.

    yunki
    Member

    well.. yeah, you’d think that 😆

    **** thing.. I’m just going to buy a snorkel.. a very long one

    CountZero
    Member

    That Earthlog site is nifty, I’ve saved it onto my homepage. According to it, I’m 62m, 203.4ft above sea-level, and I opened UK Map, which, apart from using free OS maps, also gives altitude, and it was showing ±5m, 197ft, so not far out. That was indoors… 😀

    Premier Icon Cougar
    Subscriber

    Does it actually make a fig of difference? If you’ve ridden (say) 500′ of ascent on a ride, it’ll still be 500′ whether you started at sea level or halfway up a mountain. What’s more important is that it’s accurately tracking change of elevation rather than the baseline, no?

    Cougar – Moderator
    Does it actually make a fig of difference? If you’ve ridden (say) 500′ of ascent on a ride, it’ll still be 500′ whether you started at sea level or halfway up a mountain. What’s more important is that it’s accurately tracking change of elevation rather than the baseline, no?

    POSTED 7 HOURS AGO # REPORT-POST

    No, because by the time you finish the ride, the 500 usually has you at the right altitude, approx.

    GPS is not very accurate foe measuring altitude.

    GPS info

    yunki
    Member

    no, you’re absolutely right in many ways Cougar..

    But I’m just interested in finding out stuff, like how high above sea level that little hill over there is etc

    And it just irritates me to start a ride at an impossible altitude.. and it makes the graphs look like nonsense..
    The other day for example, I rolled downhill from my house into town and caught a ferry across the estuary, rode a chuffin great hill on the other side of the river and then rode home along the bankside..

    It’s annoying to see that one side of the river is sixty odd meters lower than the other

    I’m just being fussy perhaps, but it’s a pretty big **** bug in quite an expensive and well known bit of kit..

    Premier Icon jam bo
    Subscriber

    i thought the 500 had a barometric altimeter? so it should be pretty accurate.

    is the port to it blocked?

    yunki
    Member

    Must be what’s causing it I guess

    Premier Icon Flaperon
    Subscriber

    i thought the 500 had a barometric altimeter? so it should be pretty accurate.

    Barometer in Garmin is referenced to standard pressure setting (1013 mb). High pressure system sitting over UK; currently 1035 in Exeter, leading it to under-read by about 600 feet.

    Set an elevation point corresponding to your house so the Garmin can calibrate its barometer before every ride.

    Dibbs
    Member

    If you want to know the accurate sea level you need to get down to Newlyn 😉

    http://www.ordnancesurvey.co.uk/blog/2011/08/how-do-you-measure-sea-level/

    Dibbs
    Member

    Set an elevation point corresponding to your house so the Garmin can calibrate its barometer before every ride.

    You can also setup multiple points eg if you often start a ride at Haldon you can mark a point there and set the elevation (820ft ??) and as long as you’re within about 50ft of that point the Garmin will reset to that value when you press Start.

    Premier Icon njee20
    Subscriber

    No, because by the time you finish the ride, the 500 usually has you at the right altitude, approx.

    That’ll depend on the pressure shirley? If there’s been a marked shift then it will be different, whether it started right or not. Hence you can sit on the turbo trainer and find your altitude changing quite markedly.

    I just use it for the altitude gain, rather than the actual number.

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