bird-slicing eco-crucifixes

Home Forum Chat Forum bird-slicing eco-crucifixes

Viewing 45 posts - 1 through 45 (of 68 total)
  • bird-slicing eco-crucifixes
  • CountZero
    Member

    The turbine lobby would have us believe there’s no evidence that turbines are a threat to wildlife, birds in particular.
    Well, there is now. A shame such a beautiful creature flies all this way, and its a human construct that causes its death.

    Grizla
    Member

    I’m sure it would have otherwise flown into a window or been killed by a domestic cat, like the hundreds of thousands of birds that meet that fate each year.

    Premier Icon scotroutes
    Subscriber

    The most recent figures are from the Mammal Society, which estimates that the UK’s cats catch up to 275 million prey items a year, of which 55 million are birds. This is the number of prey items that were known to have been caught; we don’t know how many more the cats caught, but didn’t bring home, or how many escaped but subsequently died.

    The most frequently caught birds, according to the Mammal Society, are probably (in order) house sparrows, blue tits, blackbirds and starlings.

    No evidence
    Despite the large numbers of birds killed, there is no scientific evidence that predation by cats in gardens is having any impact on bird populations UK-wide. This may be surprising, but many millions of birds die naturally every year, mainly through starvation, disease, or other forms of predation.
    http://www.rspb.org.uk/advice/gardening/unwantedvisitors/cats/birddeclines.aspx

    parkesie
    Member

    So? Do they taste good?

    russianbob
    Member

    Yes. What we must do is continue to use non-renewable sources of energy so a few birds don’t die.

    Premier Icon ahwiles
    Subscriber

    probably a bit like pigeon…

    (is my guess)

    Premier Icon portlyone
    Subscriber

    Evolution. Only birds that don’t fly into things will survive

    Premier Icon ransos
    Subscriber

    Gosh, I’d better cover up my French doors, seeing as one of the few garden birds not eaten by a cat managed to fly into it.

    maxtorque
    Member

    Surely the best thing would be to nail a cat to the top of each turbine? Bird have evolved to keep away from cats as a natural preditor, by putting a cat on each turbine, the birds would automatically associate a turbine with Danger……………

    slugwash
    Member

    That rare bird was already thousands of miles off course. It didn’t exactly have a track record for paying attention did it?

    Junkyard
    Member

    It was seen by birders fly straight into the turbine. It is ironic that after waiting so long for this bird to turn up in the UK it was killed by a wind turbine and not a natural predator,

    Cars drive into trees and the drivers get killed so it obviously the fault of the tree

    Premier Icon ahwiles
    Subscriber

    it’s the spinning blades that are the problem, you’d need a cat nailed to the end of each blade.

    (make sure each cat is wearing a bell – to be sure)

    Premier Icon scotroutes
    Subscriber

    Kamelbakskuttle wrote:

    That rare bird was already thousands of miles off course. It didn’t exactly have a track record for paying attention did it?

    ๐Ÿ˜†

    Premier Icon zilog6128
    Subscriber

    they’re even rarer now…

    except, they aren’t rare at all, are they? They are in the lowest tier of threat level. It’s rare to see them in this country but that’s not the same thing at all.

    Premier Icon 40mpg
    Subscriber

    The White-throated Needletail – the worldโ€™s fastest flying bird – was thousand of miles off course

    Not a good start…

    after over 80 twitches flocked to Harris – with scores more on their way

    So it can have a peaceful rest and get back on its way…

    others were coming from all over the country

    Well, not that peaceful

    It is ironic that after waiting so long for this bird to turn up in the UK it was killed by a wind turbine and not a natural predator

    So it probably wouldn’t have made it out anyway

    Some people will have lost the cost of their flights

    The crux of the problem.

    So basically it was a lost, possibly sick bird that didnt stand much of a chance, and having been chased into a turbine by the twitchers, they take their grievance out on the fact that the turbine was there ๐Ÿ™„

    Premier Icon thepurist
    Subscriber

    maxtorque – if the cats were nailed on so they were upside down on the downstroke then you could also harvest the energy from them trying to spin round to land on their feet.

    fasthaggis
    Member

    That rare bird was already thousands of miles off course. It didn’t exactly have a track record for paying attention did it?

    Thank you sir ,a perfect Friday LOL

    Premier Icon ir_bandito
    Subscriber

    Some ace comments there. Lunch all over the keyboard. ๐Ÿ™‚

    ocrider
    Member

    it’s the spinning blades that are the problem, you’d need a cat nailed to the end of each blade.

    (make sure each cat is wearing a bell – to be sure)

    – if the cats were nailed on so they were upside down on the downstroke then you could also harvest the energy from them trying to spin round to land on their feet.

    Perpetual motion may no longer be a myth!
    I don’t think that bells would be neccessary, a nauseated spinning cat would probably be an audible enough warning for even the most ****-witted of birds.

    wordnumb
    Member

    The White-throated Needletail – the worldโ€™s fastest flying bird – was thousand of miles off course

    I thought the Peregrine Falcon was fastest, able to do the Kessel Run in under 12 parsecs.

    Premier Icon verses
    Subscriber

    if the cats were nailed on so they were upside down on the downstroke then you could also harvest the energy from them trying to spin round to land on their feet.

    Brilliant.

    Perhaps alternating upside down cats and buttered toast on the blades…

    wrecker
    Member

    Loving the thread title. That’s one to be proud of.

    Premier Icon Imabigkidnow
    Subscriber

    I get about 5 birds a week fly into my 2mx3m large living room window FWIW. only ever had to go out out and physically pickup a baby pigeon once in the 2.5 yrs I’ve been here and that seemed stunned for longer than 20 minutes coz I was worried a cat would come by (as they do quite reguarly).

    Article said that bird is a fast bird … anything flying into a blade/pylon, esp at 30-40 mph or more isn’t going to survive. Figures prob not out there but I’d be interested to see how many birds mown down on roads by cars or in the air by aircraft as % vs green energy generation!!

    Premier Icon ahwiles
    Subscriber

    gosh, that pillock Delingpole finally got something right:

    they’re even rarer now…

    And of course, no birds have ever died due to pollution from fossil fuels, oil spills etc….no bird habitats have ever been displaced in order to mine for coal/drill for gas…. ๐Ÿ™„

    Premier Icon Coyote
    Subscriber

    baby pigeon

    Are you sure? Really sure?

    maxtorque
    Member

    So, it’s a “fast flying bird” How come it manged to hit one of the blades? The “turbine disc” isn’t solid, in fact, it’s much much more air than blade. Only by flying slowly was the lazy bird likely to get hit………….

    wordnumb
    Member

    So, it’s a “fast flying bird” How come it manged to hit one of the blades?

    It was distracted by a crowd of binocular-fetishists.

    Premier Icon Lifer
    Subscriber

    littlemisspanda – Member
    And of course, no birds have ever died due to pollution

    They do but it’s not as instant as hitting a turbine and no-one wants to sit around watching things eat garbage and then slowly die.

    Premier Icon bigjim
    Subscriber

    Just one? pff, oil is much better at killing http://dailydeadbirds.com/

    Premier Icon thepurist
    Subscriber

    It was distracted by a crowd of binocular-fetishists.

    Or deafened by the sound of miaowing and ringing bells and blinded by hot butter dripping into its eyes.

    Premier Icon steveoath
    Subscriber

    it is ironic that after waiting so long for this bird to turn up in the UK it was killed by a wind turbine and not a natural predator

    Surely it is coincidence, not irony? ๐Ÿ˜•

    sharkbait
    Member

    It is said to be the fastest-flying bird in flapping flight, with a confirmed maximum of 111.6 km/h (69.3 mph).It is commonly reputed to reach velocities of up to 170 km/h (105 mph), though this has not been verified.

    And it couldn’t avoid a turbine blade? Darwin.

    Premier Icon Imabigkidnow
    Subscriber

    Coyote – Member
    baby pigeon
    Are you sure? Really sure?

    Not really .. something like that though!

    EDIT: i.e. something young and pigeon/dove-esque

    Fastest flying bird is actually an Eider Duck. Strange but true. Fastest dropping bird is a Peregrine. Might just apply to UK birds.

    Premier Icon Coyote
    Subscriber

    “World’s fastest bird” or not it should never be flying beyond it’s limits to brake safely and under control. Bird is wholly at fault.

    Premier Icon molgrips
    Subscriber

    I wonder if any of those birdwatchers hit anything in their car as they flocked to Harris?

    Birds die when they crash into all sorts of things. Numbers are the issue. So far we have ONE confirmed kill don’t we?

    Premier Icon ahwiles
    Subscriber

    it’s a bit more than one…


    (photo from spain)


    (photo from Denmark)


    (photo from Brighton)

    unovolo
    Member

    Surely the best thing would be to nail a cat to the top of each turbine

    If it could not see the turbine baring in mind the size of the buggers its got no chance seeing a cat on it.

    “Worlds fastest flapping bird,with worlds worst eyesight”

    Tis a shame still.

    Premier Icon Coyote
    Subscriber

    Not wanting to be skeptical but the turbine would have to have exceptionally sharp blades and be rotating at a fair old pace to slice the head clean off a seagull.

    ocrider
    Member

    Not that they don’t deserve it, Cougar! ๐Ÿ˜‰

    Premier Icon thepurist
    Subscriber

    awhiles – so what would be an acceptable level of avian mortality to generate energy using less environmentally damaging/more sustainable means than fossil fuel?

    wordnumb
    Member

    You know how James Dyson ‘revolutionised’ office fan design with that deformed albino hula-hoop thing, could the design not be reversed to make a bladeless wind turbine?

    wordnumb
    Member

    Or we could simply burn seagulls to fuel power stations, they’re oily enough. Imagine the smell.

    Premier Icon v8ninety
    Subscriber

    Planning regulations stipulate that blades of wind turbines must;

    be able to maintain sufficient sharpness so that when bird strikes occur… the dispatch of avians would be be considered humane and prevent uneccessary suffering or distress

    -UK planning portal

Viewing 45 posts - 1 through 45 (of 68 total)

The topic ‘bird-slicing eco-crucifixes’ is closed to new replies.