Viewing 40 posts - 1 through 40 (of 44 total)
  • Bilateral hip replacement, tips and tricks!?
  • Premier Icon twinw4ll
    Free Member

    Going in to have hip replacement surgery this week after grinding it out for two years. All the advice has been to not have them done at the same time but i just want it sorted so i can get better quickly and get back on a bike again. Any insight/what to expect would be enlightening, thanks in advance for any gems of wisdom.

    Premier Icon tjagain
    Full Member

    Do not get them done at the same time – indeed I would be surprised if any surgeon would do both at the same time.

    Recovery is hard work and plenty of it.

    Premier Icon longdog
    Free Member

    I know a few who’ve had both hips done, and recovery was pretty quick for each one, but not both at the same time. I think that would be too challenging and you’d need a lot of support at home with everyday living.

    Premier Icon shermer75
    Free Member

    There’s a protocol to follow for the first few weeks as there is an increased risk of dislocation (no crossing your legs or flexing past 90 degrees- you’ll be told exactly what after the surgery but you’ll be groggy so hold on to any bits of paper they give you!) and then it’s all about making sure you do your rehab, as replaced hips are VERY prone to getting stiff- as in permanently, disablingly stiff. So do your exercises! Oh, and evidence supports early mobilisation (as in getting out of bed on day 1 or even day 0 post surgery) is a good indicater for a successful surgery. So when the physio comes round to get you out of bed, feel free to have a quick moan about the pain but then get out of bed! We’re not doing it for our own amusement. In fact, trust me, it’s not amusing at all, just super important, for your sake

    Premier Icon shermer75
    Free Member

    Recovery is hard work and plenty of it.

    Exactly this ^^

    The surgery is not the solution, just the start of it

    Premier Icon duncancallum
    Full Member

    Had one done.

    Best thing ever! Just keep at the physio

    And then more physio etc.

    Premier Icon dyna-ti
    Free Member

    See if you can get the old hips home with you. Say its part of your religion or something to be buried whole.

    You could make a smashing pair of bedside lamps

    Premier Icon ahsat
    Full Member

    My Mum had one done, and the second 2 years later. Tbh, I would personally not do both at once seeing her having gone through that (she was given the choice), as for starters getting in and out of bed with one done is really hard – both would be nearly impossible. She now cycles a lot; so its well worth it. Advice above is all good. Only comment on reflection – get some private physio once you have a bit more go ahead after the initial phases. NHS physio isn’t great (certainly not in Yorkshire) post hips (the physios are lovely, they just don’t have the resources – and I imagine even less so now many are tied up post covid), and my Mum feels her glutes never recovered which has lead to some other issues (that said, I don’t think they might quite such a big cut as they used too – hers are 8 and 6 years old now).

    Premier Icon tjagain
    Full Member

    See if you can get the old hips home with you. Say its part of your religion or something to be buried whole.

    My mother asked for hers – she was shown them but not allowed to keep them. Hazardous waste regs or some such nonsense

    Premier Icon nbt
    Full Member

    See if you can get the old hips home with you. Say its part of your religion or something to be buried whole.

    My mother asked for hers – she was shown them but not allowed to keep them. Hazardous waste regs or some such nonsense

    Never thought to ask for Mrs NBT’s and was not offered the choice. THe surgeon was later struck off for taking them home though 😮

    Premier Icon avdave2
    Free Member

    Advice from my dad. Just because it’s stated in your notes 3 times that you are allergic to penicillin, that you have a wrist band on which states it and you have had the conversation more than once with them doesn’t mean they won’t give it to you!

    Premier Icon twinw4ll
    Free Member

    Looks like i may be in uncharted territory with both being done.
    I had a feeling it was a long shot, I’ll report on the challenges next week.🤣

    Premier Icon tjagain
    Full Member

    Please reconsider having both done at once. Its really a bad idea as your rehab will be very much more difficult. Usually at least a 6 month gap between them

    Premier Icon argee
    Full Member

    I’d just get one done as many other say, then ask for the injection in the other to keep you going once the first has recovered, that way you at least get to feel normal prior to the second, so maybe Op1 this week, injection +3 months, then hopefully only another 1 injection before the 2nd Op, if possible of course, it’s a bit of a mess just now for these ops, especially with cancellations and so on.

    Premier Icon qwerty
    Free Member

    Hip Hop – you don’t stop 🎶🎵

    Premier Icon ton
    Free Member

    had my left one done 3 years ago. best thing i have done (since heart surgery ).
    currently waiting for a date for my right doing.

    i didnt need my right doing 3 years ago. but if i did i would have had em done together.
    pain was minimal. physio was done very strictly, i was back on the bike after 10 days.

    Premier Icon longdog
    Free Member

    injection +3 months, then hopefully only another 1 injection before the 2nd Op,

    If you’re referring to a steroid injection, be ware that some surgeons have a minimum time limit that you can have one before a replacement to avoid the risk of infection. I had to be wary of this when I got my knee replaced. I think my surgeon was happy with 3 months since the last injection, others could be longer.

    Premier Icon mikertroid
    Free Member

    My girlfriend is recovering from her Right hip replacement 3 weeks ago and I’m caring for her.

    On no planet would I recommend doing both at the same time!!!

    Premier Icon scaredypants
    Full Member

    pay the extra and get the “limbo” or “disco” model

    If they’re contemplating letting you have both sides done, maybe its “just” resurfacing ?

    Premier Icon RamseyNeil
    Full Member

    Had one of mine resurfaced and it’s just as big an operation as a full replacement .

    Premier Icon twinw4ll
    Free Member

    It’s not resurfacing it’s complete hip replacement, it’s interesting to know there are folk on here who seem better informed than my consultant who has looked at my xrays and chatted extensively with me. I was looking for things that have been experienced first hand that may help AFTER I’ve had the operation. I know some of you mean well, but telling me i should only get one done at a time is NOT helpful.
    Thanks Ton 👍

    Premier Icon duncancallum
    Full Member

    You got a pool close?

    Walking in water helps as you are obviously not full weight bearing let’s you get rid of the crutches and practice Walking.

    And never cross your legs…

    Premier Icon undarra
    Free Member

    I’ve only had the one done but echo what others have said, physio, physio, physio. Best thing ever though to get your fitness and mobility back. Good luck and hope all goes well.

    Premier Icon mikertroid
    Free Member

    Well, if you’re dead set on getting both done, you’ll need a carer close at hand as you won’t be able to dress, wash or feed yourself (hands will be busy with crutches) for a few weeks.

    If you have someone who will be with you most of the day, then it’ll be possible for sure as people do have both done at the same time.

    The consultant doesn’t necessarily see the aftercare perspective as he/she is more concerned with the operation side….there’s plenty I’ve learnt after the event that hasn’t been discussed with him or mentioned in the advice.
    A chat with a physio might be useful.

    Also agree about physio and strength. My g/f was riding up until the day before her op, but in the 3 weeks since has lost an amazing amount of strength in her operated-on leg.

    Premier Icon shermer75
    Free Member

    And never cross your legs…

    This is only for the first few weeks, not forever

    Premier Icon shermer75
    Free Member

    You may get a different protocol, but this can serve as a guide:

    Total hip precautions after surgery should be followed for 3 months and include:
    o Avoid hip flexion past 90°
    o Avoid internal rotation of the lower extremity.
    o Avoid crossing the midline of the body.
    o Avoid sitting on low, soft surfaces.

    Latest evidence suggests that the risk of dislocation is lower than was previously thought, but orthos get very serious about it still so it is probably good advice to follow.

    Premier Icon eddie
    Free Member

    I’ve assisted for a fair few bilateral hips over the years, surgeon will only do bilateral if he/she thinks patient can handle the post op. Mostly done on young ish fit people. Hopefully surgeon will be able to do it through a 2-3 inch incision which helps with recovery. It will be a bit of bitch for a month or so but least you only have to through it once. Physio most important as others have said.
    Good luck with it

    Premier Icon twinw4ll
    Free Member

    Just a quick update, i had my surgery full prosthetic on both hips on Thursday and came home Saturday, I’m really glad i had them done at the same time. The physio was amazed at my recovery, I’m able to put full weight on both hips and recon the crutches will be gone pretty soon.
    Yes it’s tougher than one, but you only have to do it once and i feel six inches taller, happy days. 🙂

    Premier Icon shermer75
    Free Member

    That’s great news! Sounds like you’re smashing it, good work 😀

    Premier Icon shermer75
    Free Member

    You hear about the evidence supporting the value of ‘pre-hab’ and how the fitter the patient is going into surgery the better the likely outcome is, but it’s nice to see it in action

    Premier Icon tjagain
    Full Member

    Good stuff – you proved my concerns false!  well done

    Premier Icon twinw4ll
    Free Member

    Thanks guys, means a lot, cheers for the support 👍

    Premier Icon GoatKarma
    Free Member

    Piggy backing on this thread. My (early 40s) wife fell about 10 days ago and severely fractured her hip – she’s had surgery for a transfemoral nail . She’s still in hospital recovering and the rehab only really started about 5 days after surgery due to low bp /oxycontin issues.

    There’s not much on the internet about this surgery (unless it has a different name) and the booklet she has been given is only for hip replacements. Can I assume the recovery will be similar? She can only shuffle a few steps on a zimmer and is in lots of pain with any lateral motion (minor hip abduction I guess)… No one seems to know if it’s just muscles/tendons rubbing and moving over the metal or if there’s something more sinister. Anyone had similar surgery?

    It’s a total nightmare trying to speak to anyone at the hospital as they are so understaffed and physio/occhealth/docs/nurses don’t seem to communicate with each other. My wife says she has already been discharged by occupational health as I ordered a frame for the toilet and they said that’s all she needed.. But we don’t even know if she can get up stairs to the bed when she gets home!

    Sorry.. Think there are questions in there somewhere.

    Premier Icon tjagain
    Full Member

    She should have had a proper home assessment prior to getting discharged and in my limited experience a nail is not the same as a full hip – I don’t think she should be putting full weight on it yet but really am not sure – not my field

    A nail should be completely encased in the bone I would have thought so nothing should rub on it but again my very limited knowledge from a long time ago

    Sounds like a situation where you need to politely but firmly ask for answers.  Unfortunately the squeaking gate gets the grease.  You need to advocate for her and be that squeaking gate

    she should be seen by physios and tested on stairs before discharge.  Is visiting allowed?  next time you are in ask for a meeting with the doc and have a list of questions prepared.

    Premier Icon Flaperon
    Free Member

    My dad had the same operation a few years ago and walked out of the hospital the next day. He was in his 50’s but relatively fit and strong.

    I got the impression that the loss of a lot of bone marrow (and maybe blood during the op) left him a bit anaemic but he was fully recovered within three months.

    One thing that did give him grief was the screw inserted lower down his leg to stabilise the pin, which had a permanent haematoma over it and was quite painful. He had it taken out at a private hospital as an out-patient and no problems since.

    Premier Icon tjagain
    Full Member

    You know this ( the OPs post) is one of the few times I have been genuinely pleased to be proven wrong!  🙂

    Premier Icon jamesoz
    Full Member

    @GoatKarma, two weeks ago I injured myself with a comminuted fracture of the left superior pubic Ramus and non displaced fracture of the symphysis pubis extending to the medial aspect of the inferior pubis ramus.

    I didn’t need surgery but most of a week in hospital

    I have not a clue what most of that means, except I fractured my pelvis in two places, I didn’t need surgery but what I can say is it is the most painful injury I’ve ever experienced, I can just about shuffle around on a frame/crutches. The Doctors/physio explained it is a very painful area for a fracture, in case I hadn’t noticed.
    Are the pain meds sufficient?

    Premier Icon GoatKarma
    Free Member

    Thanks all, I’m visiting every day and asked for a doc chat but it never materialized yet – they seem to come once in the morning at a random time then that’s it.

    Also spoken to nurse in charge about the pain issue she has and trying to get some traction for them to investigate. The physio thinks it’s because her muscle and bones are stronger so it’s a bigger trauma, but I’m not so sure as she’s in agony with any sort of hip abduction.

    Pain meds are tricky as her bp was dangerously low with fainting even lying down when she’s on a high dosage of oxycontin. She’s down to 3×3(whatever a 3 is) a day plus breakthroughs of a “2” when needed.

    Premier Icon tjagain
    Full Member

    Insist on the meeting with a senior doctor.  thats the best advice.  It might have to be at their convenience not yours and thats fair enough but the meeting should be accomodated

    Premier Icon northshoreniall
    Full Member

    @goatkarma I’ve not done much ortho but if traumatic injury it’s highly possible a lot of pain is from soft tissue injury which can take longer to settle, including local swelling – all potentially giving pain longer.
    As per TJ she should have a stairs assessment prior to discharge. Don’t be shy, also as per TJ, if you make more noise you’ll get the attention – it’s shit but needs must.

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