Best skills course

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  • Best skills course
  • Ringo
    Member

    Jedi, he’s the best

    hora
    Member

    Yoga? Core training, weights and fitness? I’d do these first.

    mulv1976
    Member

    “The don” was pretty good

    abennell
    Member

    I already do all of the above Hora, I know my fitness can be improved a bit, however I climb better than most of my friends, just need to improve some more.
    Plus mrs ab is wandering what to get me for xmas!!!

    Grizla
    Member

    I’ve been to see Jedi, and had a great day.

    Would like to go see Ed Oxley (Great Rock) too.

    Premier Icon thepurist
    Subscriber

    If you can get to Jedi, go. If you can get to Ed-O, go. That is all.

    xiphon
    Member

    Depends on what areas you feel you need to improve on?

    Ringo – Member
    Jedi, he’s the best

    Who else have you been to?

    Premier Icon sandwicheater
    Subscriber

    Did a two day course with Ed Oxley and took a great deal away from it.

    Gave me a good base to build on and Nigel Page was there for added advice.

    Do hear good things about Jedi, been a few posts on here.

    abennell
    Member

    The Ed Oxley one is closer, I will look into them both and have a think.

    many thanks

    Ant

    sharkattack
    Member

    Can anyone give a little sneak peak at what they actually teach you on a skills course? Why are they so great?

    I imagine they’re mostly for people who come to mountain biking in later life and are terrified of jumps, drops and roots (no bad thing, got lots of mates like this).

    If you spent your whole youth doing skids and wheelies and can ride anything put in front of you is there anything you can gain from a coaching session?

    Premier Icon Onzadog
    Subscriber

    Having been to both Ed-O and Jedi this year, it’s Jedi I’ll be going back to.

    xiphon
    Member

    Sharky wrote:

    Can anyone give a little sneak peak at what they actually teach you on a skills course? Why are they so great?

    I imagine they’re mostly for people who come to mountain biking in later life and are terrified of jumps, drops and roots (no bad thing, got lots of mates like this).

    If you spent your whole youth doing skids and wheelies and can ride anything put in front of you is there anything you can gain from a coaching session?

    The million dollar question!

    Ringo
    Member

    Haven’t been to any others, but I’m a cocky fecker and Jedi is the best. In my opinion and to me that’s all that matters

    abennell
    Member

    Hello,
    I want to improve my skills as I’ve been riding for a long time and want to get better.
    Who would you recommend, I’ve heard good things about the Jedi but wondered if there is anyone else?

    Any advice is gratefully received.

    Ant

    chvck
    Member

    Sharky wrote:

    Can anyone give a little sneak peak at what they actually teach you on a skills course? Why are they so great?
    I imagine they’re mostly for people who come to mountain biking in later life and are terrified of jumps, drops and roots (no bad thing, got lots of mates like this).
    If you spent your whole youth doing skids and wheelies and can ride anything put in front of you is there anything you can gain from a coaching session?

    I went to a jumps and drops course with a couple of mates, we were already pretty comfortable jumping small gaps etc… One of the major things that we learnt was that we were jumping with the totally wrong technique. Jumps now feel much more comfortable and if I mess up I’m more likely to ride it out.

    edit: I’ve been riding since I was a kid but everyone is going to get a different amount out of a course etc…

    Ringo – Member
    Haven’t been to any others, but I’m a cocky fecker and Jedi is the best. In my opinion and to me that‘s all that matters

    ftfy

    xiphon
    Member

    chvck wrote:

    I went to a jumps and drops course with a couple of mates, we were already pretty comfortable jumping small gaps etc… One of the major things that we learnt was that we were jumping with the totally wrong technique. Jumps now feel much more comfortable and if I mess up I’m more likely to ride it out.

    What if you’re comfortable launching 15-20ft gaps?
    And happily ride any trail blind – up to what the ‘instructor’ would consider their own limit (blind).

    (Which is what I think what sharkattack is getting at)

    chvck
    Member

    What if you’re comfortable launching 15-20ft gaps?
    And happily ride any trail blind – up to what the ‘instructor’ would consider their own limit (blind).

    (Which is what I think what sharkattack is getting at)

    Fair enough! I can’t really comment there but I’d think that anyone (who isn’t top of their game) would learn something if the ‘instructor’ was a pro racer or the like.

    robinlaidlaw
    Member

    Fair enough! I can’t really comment there but I’d think that anyone (who isn’t top of their game) would learn something if the ‘instructor’ was a pro racer or the like

    Presumably they don’t need to be a top racer, they just need to be a very good coach. After all, the top DH racers still benefit from coaching, but must be more capable on their bikes than their coaches, otherwise the coaches would be the ones racing and winning.

    xiphon
    Member

    robinlaidlaw wrote:

    Presumably they don’t need to be a top racer, they just need to be a very good coach. After all, the top DH racers still benefit from coaching, but must be more capable on their bikes than their coaches, otherwise the coaches would be the ones racing and winning.

    True, in respect of football team managers vs. the players. Each is good at their respective thing.

    I wonder if the pro DH’ers receive ‘skills’ training from their coaches, or more ‘psychological’ (and nutritional, and fitness….)

    Same with tennis players – the pros play against each other for match training – but have coaches for other things.

    Premier Icon zilog6128
    Subscriber

    I went to a jumps and drops course with a couple of mates, we were already pretty comfortable jumping small gaps etc… One of the major things that we learnt was that we were jumping with the totally wrong technique. Jumps now feel much more comfortable and if I mess up I’m more likely to ride it out.

    Yep, I got Jedi’d a few months back and he basically (politely!) told me I was doing everything wrong, then over the course of the day he showed me his way of doing it – which tbh did feel much better/smoother/more in control. Having never intentionally got both wheels off the ground before I was clearing the 6′ table by the end! Would recommend 100%.

    Even if you’ve been riding for years (like I have) unless you are a riding god there’s probably something to be gained by having someone with experience watching you ride and giving you stuff to work on. Yeah it was expensive but I wish I’d done it years ago!!

    iolo
    Member

    I’m not sure if they still do it but the Athertons did excellent training days in Llandegla.

    Premier Icon bails
    Subscriber

    Presumably they don’t need to be a top racer, they just need to be a very good coach. After all, the top DH racers still benefit from coaching, but must be more capable on their bikes than their coaches, otherwise the coaches would be the ones racing and winning.

    +1

    I went on a jumps and drops course which was run by a very competent rider, but he wasn’t a great coach.

    Essentially it was “do some manuals”, then 4 repeats of “ride over this jump while doing the manual type of movement”.

    Each time he’d watch us do it a few times each and then we’d move on. no real individual feedback or analysis.

    As a fairly competent rider (my weakest aspect is probably jumps and drops –hence the course–, stuff like Caddon Bank at Innerleithen, the jump combined with a descent and a big drop on the one side freaks me out a bit) I didn’t gain much from it. I certainly don’t think that there’s anything I couldn’t do before that I now can.

    Someone else on here has described the (not so good) skills courses as “a guided tour of a trail centre” and I’d agree with that.

    Ringo
    Member

    Sounds about right rusty… Cheers 🙂

    marco
    Member

    Ed O, he’s not egotistical, knows loads about bikes & biking, loves bikes & biking and is an all round great fella.
    Plus his beard is frickin awesome

    xiphon
    Member

    “a guided tour of a trail centre”

    Ha! Love it!

    iolo
    Member

    Steve from Wheelism is also really good. I’ve not personally used him but have only heard good things.

    Premier Icon Onzadog
    Subscriber

    Of those who are suggesting Jedi or Ed (generally the two most popular suggestions on such threads), how many have first hand experience of both?

    Premier Icon Onzadog
    Subscriber

    As for the “guided tour of a trail centre”, I did that one as well. Most uninspiring. So much for the legacy!

    kudos100
    Member

    Fair enough! I can’t really comment there but I’d think that anyone (who isn’t top of their game) would learn something if the ‘instructor’ was a pro racer or the like.

    Nah xiphon is so good he thinks he can teach Greg Minnaar riding skills.

    Comedy gold.

    Premier Icon zilog6128
    Subscriber

    Of those who are suggesting Jedi or Ed (generally the two most popular suggestions on such threads), how many have first hand experience of both?

    You are the only person I can recall saying has been coached by both! I guess most people would just go to whoever’s closest. Not sure many can afford to drive all over the country having multiple coaching sessions (although it would probably be money well spent!)

    I did a weekend with ed in a group, he’s a really nice guy and I had a great weekend but I feel the coaching needs to be done as an individual as I didn’t get that much out of it as I’d have hoped.

    hora
    Member

    From what I understand you need a few lessons.

    Ive heard people say great but forgot most of what learnt after a while.

    Euro
    Member

    Even if you’ve been riding for years (like I have)

    Having never intentionally got both wheels off the ground before I was clearing the 6′ table by the end!

    Not meaning to single you out zilog, but this crops up quite a bit on here. What were you(s) doing for all those years? Riding a bike a not doing jumps? It’s as if this guy never existed 😀

    fakesounding
    Member

    Onzadog wrote:

    Of those who are suggesting Jedi or Ed (generally the two most popular suggestions on such threads), how many have first hand experience of both?

    I’ve done the 2-day flow course with Ed, and have been jedi-ed. Would happily (and when finances allow, will) go back to either. Ed is a great teacher with an exceptional beard, and jedi is a quiet genius who will open you up to a totally different approach to riding your bike, and will also make you a great cup of coffee

    Premier Icon Onzadog
    Subscriber

    Hora, that’s the difference with Tony/Jedi, although it can vary with learning style, the transformation is often instantaneous.

    Mate of mine found it didn’t click on the day which he found frustrating. However, a few rides later, midway through, it just clicked. You could actually see the moment it happened.

    Euro
    Member

    How many skills courses you been at Onzadog?

    dantsw13
    Member

    I did a 1 to 1 with Jedi, and a group “Alps Prep” with Ed Oxley. I’d go back to both, but very different courses.

    fakesounding
    Member

    Onzadog wrote:

    Mate of mine found it didn’t click on the day which he found frustrating. However, a few rides later, midway through, it just clicked. You could actually see the moment it happened.

    It did take me a few rides to get used to the jedi method on other trails. Then I knackered my wrist at work and haven’t been able to ride for 2 months so I’ll no doubt have forgotten most of what I had learned 🙁

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