Viewing 25 posts - 1 through 25 (of 25 total)
  • best brakes for a tourer?
  • Premier Icon ton
    Free Member

    gonna give my rourer a bit of a overall. mainly because the TRP spyre brakes, run with shimano brake levers are pretty crap.
    so option 1 is to change the brakes to something i know works, that being avid bb7 cable discs or shimano slx hydros.

    or swap the bars to some wide drops and have a go with some drop bar hydro brakes, which i have never tried.

    to be run on my disc trucker, with a 21 stone rider and panniers.

    Premier Icon swedishmetal
    Free Member

    I’d go with hydros with big discs. You’re a big guy with a heavy bike and luggage, power doesn’t need to be massive but heat dissipation does! I’m similar and I have Deore touring Hydro brakes (4 finger levers) and 180/180 discs.

    Premier Icon n0b0dy0ftheg0at
    Free Member

    If tourer is flat mount, https://www.merlincycles.com/shimano-105-r7020-hydraulic-disc-sti-levers-r7070-flat-mount-disc-calipers-11-speed-119868.html is hard to beat in their current promo, ~£221 even if you don’t add more to basket to get it over £300 for 10% discount.

    Premier Icon stevemakin
    Full Member

    Pauls Klampers 😉

    Premier Icon trail_rat
    Free Member

    For actual touring -cable something’s probably bb7s as they are the most user friendly -even if some folk on here still make a mess of it.

    For a touring bike thats just used for getting about and not actually for touring

    Hydros of some kind.

    You’ll always get a brake cable even from tesco or a little backwoods shop mid no where -as ssuming you already used your spare….hydro seals always go at the most inconviannt time. Likewise they don’t suffer from fluid boiling on long loaded descents

    Premier Icon mickolas
    Full Member

    I have trp spyre on the back of a road bike. Bit disappointing. Somewhat improved with jagwire pro compressionless outer. I’ve heard that the standard pads are junk and there are big gains with changing to swiss stop or some other. That is my next move.

    Premier Icon jameso
    Full Member

    Well this works – listen to Swedishmetal…

    (another option is TRPs with 180s F+R or a 203 up front, deore resin pads, good outers and maybe SRAM levers for a slightly different pull. Set them up biting with the TRP arm as far back as poss.)

    Premier Icon damascus
    Free Member

    Compressionless outer cables, cut correctly and to the correct length to avoid movement makes all the difference with cable brakes.

    Premier Icon montgomery
    Free Member

    After ten years on BB7s with no problems, I tried compressionless Jagwire cables out of curiosity. Cost more – and made no improvement that I wouldn’t have got with a bog standard set of new cables. Possibly maintained that ‘new cable’ feel for longer, but otherwise no benefit. I’ve filed it under the Fairy Liquid/salt, compliant steel frame school of received cycling bullshit lore.

    Premier Icon 5lab
    Free Member

    assuming you’re not riding in the alps, large rotors will largely be a complete waste of time – in the UK there’s very few roads where you’ll exceed the heat capacity of small rotors on a road decent

    Premier Icon simondbarnes
    Full Member

    assuming you’re not riding in the alps, large rotors will largely be a complete waste of time – in the UK there’s very few roads where you’ll exceed the heat capacity of small rotors on a road decent

    I’d completely disagree with that. Fully loaded touring bikes weigh a *lot* – I can barely lift mine. Ton isn’t exactly lightweight either.

    Premier Icon airvent
    Free Member

    @5lab theres plenty, especially in the North Pennines areas there are roads that descend several thousand feet in one hit.

    Premier Icon vincienup
    Full Member

    I believe the old Hope 6-pot Monos used to be a popular choice for tourer fronts specifically because of heat handling from heavily loaded bikes…

    Premier Icon simondbarnes
    Full Member

    especially in the North Pennines areas there are roads that descend several thousand feet in one hit.

    The highest point in the Pennines is under 3,000ft (Cross Fell) so you’re stretching things a bit there.

    Premier Icon 5lab
    Free Member

    Most uk road descents dont need as many stops as the Alps do either – if you’re happy to carry moderate speed on a given road air resistance will do everything you need, it’s only roads of more than about 1 in 8 with loads of switchbacks that’ll really generate heat, and I stick by my assertion that theres probably few enough of them in the uk not to really worry

    An normal bike with rider is what, 90kg of weight? How much load are you strapping to a touring bike to significantly impact that? On a tandem you’re into serious problems (or my cargo bike, with toddlers on board, and drum brakes), but a bit of gear is not a significant weight to the overall system

    Rotor size adds naff all extra heat capacity anyway, the difference in surface area of a 160 vs 200mm rotor is somewhere around 15%

    Premier Icon MoreCashThanDash
    Full Member

    Given that plenty of riders comfortably exceed 90kg, plus 15kg for a touring bike plus another 20kg of kit…….

    Premier Icon pdw
    Free Member

    The UK may not have the altitude changes of the Alps, but it does do quite a good line in steep descents with poor visibility, forcing you to drag the brakes and losing nothing to air resistance. The Alpine descents I’ve ridden all have significant sections where you can stay off the brakes and let them cool in a 40mph breeze.

    I once rather foolishly tried to descend a hill in Wales using just the front brake, and completely overheated the pads, to the point where I was pulling harder and harder to achieve the same stopping force and very quickly that wasn’t enough to stop the bike.

    Obviously I’d normally use both brakes but it made me think that there’s not a huge margin for error. I’d guess I normally use 60-65% front brake, I’m 70kg, had no luggage, and this was a 160mm rotor with ice tech pads. A heavier rider with a bit of luggage would have been borderline at best on both brakes.

    To answer your question, touring kit could be 20kg, so a bit over 20% on a 90kg starting point.

    I reckon surface area is going to be approximately linear with diameter so going from 160mm to 200mm is 25%. Sounds like what you’d want to do on a tourer.

    Remember, you don’t want to plan for most road descents, you want to plan for the worst one you’ll ever encounter.

    Premier Icon swedishmetal
    Free Member

    assuming you’re not riding in the alps, large rotors will largely be a complete waste of time – in the UK there’s very few roads where you’ll exceed the heat capacity of small rotors on a road decent

    What a load of rubbish. Very easily overheated discs on my tourer before, I’m 16st and with a full load of panniers even big discs can struggle. You have to use both brakes and I tend to start with the rear to try and scrub speed off at the top of the descent and all the way down it reserving the front for braking for corners or if it gets a bit excessive.

    Anyway I’ve no idea why people are so resistant to bigger discs anyway – more power, better heat dissipation for hardly any extra weight. This is why I have 203mm discs front and back on my off-road MTB – why wouldnt you?

    Premier Icon Malvern Rider
    Free Member

    Used to have Spyres on the Vagabond. Was disappoint. Even with semi-sintered pads.

    Since swapping for a Longitude (again for roughstuff touring) I’ve inherited BB7s paired with the standard Avid 160mm rotors and (oddly) a pair of Sora R3000 flat-bar levers. These give me a fistful of pull that I’ve missed when using various Avid 2/3 finger levers over the years.

    Changing to loop bars it needed recabling so I found some NOS Avid Flak Jacket low-compression cable sets in the LBC and stuck those on. With this setup (and perfectly true rotors/tight pad tolerance) I find that the BB7s do outperform the Spyres by some margin.

    Weird, as I know with BB7s that there’s onlŷ one moving caliper and the braking is achieved by rotor deformation pushing it against the inboard (static) pad.

    Apart from some initial squealing in the wet/damp (which soon burns off) and my 230lbs bulk – I find that they lock up fine and modulate well enough. Nothing refined, but as that polo-necked sweater dude said – ‘it just works’. Haven’t carried any cargo down big hills as yet, and that will decide whether to go to a bigger rotor upfront.

    Premier Icon trail_rat
    Free Member

    Because the pads barely get warm enough under normal use in the UK and glaze/howl* and large rotors can be grabby (often talked about as “power” )

    * My experiance of running massive rotors is this is exasperated on largely road use.

    14st on a fully loaded tourer through the Canadian rockies on 160 tektro rxls or some other such often slagged off pish. No issues stopped me from 80kph on occasions- such as the police man not being impressed with my speed

    Premier Icon swedishmetal
    Free Member

    Because the pads barely get warm enough under normal use in the UK and glaze/howl* and large rotors can be grabby (often talked about as “power” )

    Barely get hot? Have you ever touched a brake when you’ve been down a big hill?

    Never had a glazing or howling issue – if you’re gonna get it you’ll get it with a 160mm disc as well as a 203.

    Grabby? Eh? Nonsense. Maybe you need more practise pulling brake levers.

    Premier Icon trail_rat
    Free Member

    *deleted * CBA … I don’t have the issues with overheating you have. I’ll leave it at that.

    Premier Icon martymac
    Full Member

    I’m a similar weight to ton, and use my bike in full bikepacking/touring mode.
    Hydro or cable are both fine, changing pads can make a difference also, but by far the most reliable change is to increase the rotor size.
    180fr 160rr would be the absolute minimum imo.
    200fr 180rr preferred.
    As mentioned above, it costs virtually nothing in terms of weight, so why wouldn’t you?
    I use 200\180 on my fs ebike, i go camping on that, it’s so heavy I can’t lift it, never had any issues at all with brakes.

    Premier Icon Dickyboy
    Full Member

    An normal bike with rider is what, 90kg of weight? How much load are you strapping to a touring bike to significantly impact that? On a tandem you’re into serious problems

    Somebody didn’t read the Op did they, at 21st the op is about 135kg and only 3st lighter than me & Mrs Db on the tandem – another vote for bb7 & 200mm rotors btw.

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