Battery chainsaws

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  • Battery chainsaws
  • st
    Member

    I’m after a bit of advice on battery chainsaws.

    I’ve got hedge to cut back before the leaves start to bud and reckon it’d be a lot easier with a chainsaw than a combination of hedge trimmer, loppers and saw. It’s a job to do every few years so not regular use.

    As I’d also have a use for a chainsaw for a bit of trail maintenance I was wondering about a battery powered version on the basis that it’ll be quieter in use for low key trail work and it’ll save having to store fuel and maintain an engine.

    But are they any good? I’d be looking at under £150 where there seem to be a few.

    Ta.

    I have the Aldi one, was 50 quid for the base saw with no battery or charger, another 50 for 2 batteries and a charger IIRC (I have a petrol husky, but the battery saw is very quiet for under the radar trail work 😉

    It’s very good, not sure if they sell em online.

    Premier Icon Tracey
    Subscriber

    We have a Ryobi one+. Use it for local trail tidying and the occasional logs for the fire pit. Does what we want it to do

    Merak
    Member

    I saw a cooncil chap using a battery Stihl saw the other day. I was impressed tbh not sure it would have the kick of my fossil Husky but it’s loud AF.

    Goes off to research battery chainsaws. Can they really cut the same as petrol power?

    I’ve got hedge to cut back before the leaves start to bud and reckon it’d be a lot easier with a chainsaw than a combination of hedge trimmer, loppers and saw. It’s a job to do every few years so not regular use.

    What you need is an Alligator.

    nickjb
    Member

    Got the florabest pole saw from Lidl and a little shihl. Both are nice to use. Minimum fuss. Quiet. Clean. The Stihl is nicer and does cut better but the florabest is great for the money. The chain and bar are Oregon parts, I presume they make it. No need for petrol unless you really are doing loads of cutting away from power.

    Premier Icon maccruiskeen
    Subscriber

    It’s a job to do every few years so not regular use

    Unless you have other things to use the batteries for in the meantime get something mains powered or hire something when you’ll actually use it.

    powertool batteries have a habit of being unchargable after being left unused for years at a time

    another reason to hire would be – you probably only need to attack a hedge with a chainsaw because it’s gotten out of hand and really needs reshaping. After that a hedge trimmer – as the name suggests – is probably the best tool for trimming a hedge. It would take about a decade for any new growth to be anything a hedge trimmer couldn’t handle

    B.A.Nana
    Member

    I put a Makita electric chainsaw together for between £250-£300. Makita body £116 (ebay), 2 X Makita battery charger £70 (online or ebay), 2 x 18v Amazon batteries £50-£80 (amazon). Can’t recall exact final price but has been brill for lighter duty. None Makita batteries I found have been good but no idea how they compare to the much more expensive originals.
    this one
    https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/41S%2B4aus5hL._AC_SX466_.jpg

    chains I bought from a co in sheffield at 2 for £15 postage incl. recommended by a local gardener / tree surgeon guy.

    Can they really cut the same as petrol power?

    No, but I use it for different jobs than I do my petrol saw, I knew that when I bought it.

    Premier Icon burko73
    Subscriber

    The makita ones are good. I’ve got a top handled version of the above. It’s great for bits and bobs around the garden and odd jobs.

    The chain will still cut you etc so you’ll need to take care. Using a chainsaw on a hedge up a ladder isn’t the easiest or safest introduction.

    Also – using it on someone else’s land isn’t a great idea if you don’t have permission, safety gear, arent insured etc. You’re ‘going equipped’ if you’ve managed to plan ahead enough to take a chainsaw with you! A silky saw in your bag is one thing…

    Premier Icon GeForce Junky
    Subscriber

    Slightly off topic, but I have a mains powered Oregon chainsaw and I love the fact the chain stops very very quickly. Feels much safer to use for untrained mortals.

    st
    Member

    Thanks for the feedback all. Sounds like it might be a worthwhile investment.

    The hedge in question is 6’ high and I want to cut up to 1’ off the top before growing season kicks in and the birds start nesting. It’ll be done standing on the drive.

    As far as heading into the woods it’s for clearing trails rather than felling trees. I’ve done enough time on the Silky to know how that goes ;o)

    Premier Icon nach
    Subscriber

    None Makita batteries I found have been good but no idea how they compare to the much more expensive originals.

    Not the same batteries but might give you an idea. These can be a bit tedious to watch, but he’s pretty thorough. Short version: brand name tool batteries will tend to be built from higher quality 18650 cells. Off-brand batteries generally do fine though.

    scruff
    Member

    Get it bought, lets build some mo’ shore.

    B.A.Nana
    Member

    I’ve just had a check and the above makita duc353z I put together for £213

    duc353z body from PowertoolWorld (not sure if direct or ebay) @ 116.99
    dc18rd charger from top_tools_ltd off ebay (new) @ 46.45
    2 x batteries from powayup off Amazon 5.5ah @ 49.99

    replacement chains from northern arb supplies @ 2 for £15

    marksnook
    Member

    I’ve got the brushless makita saw, it’s amazing for quick jobs in the garden and cuts out the need for engine maintenance. I use makita cordless kit in work though so i have a ready supply off batteries

    The option for cheeky quiet trail use is a massive bonus especially with all the storms knocking down trees at the minute.

    Would a hedge trimmer be more useful? When cutting The thicker branches in my hedges I have caught a small branch/bramble before and jammed the chain. No snapped chains yet but I have a landscaper friend and he has been hit by chains jamming and snapping on small stuff. I think I only use my chainsaw for a tiny proportion of garden duties. Hedge trimmer and hand saw probably get used for hedges and 2” or smaller branches

    alpin
    Member

    Have got the makita chainsaw.

    Great for quick jobs, best used with 5Amh batteries as the smaller ones run out of juice quickly.

    If you’ve got lots of timber then petrol is best.

    z1ppy
    Member

    Was recommended a Stiga SC 24 ae unit by a guy who works in a garden machinery place, he’s put aside his internal discount to go elsewhere to buy one… I thought that a pretty good recommendation. Personally I was looking at their heavy duty(ish as they do a more power ful one..) hedge cutter supplemented by my silky. But bills have put pay to that for a month or so, then I’m into the hedge cutting ban

    Murray
    Member

    @st how long’s the hedge? It might be easier to use long handled loppers to cut the main stems – you’ll get a lot of foliage for a small number of cuts.

    I’d to just below 6′ so that you get fresh growth to the height you want.

    Premier Icon dropoff
    Subscriber

    We use stihl rc82 in both r and t variants. Best advice to you would be to hire a rc82r. You’ll do a better job in half the time as trying to do it with a chainsaw. Also it could be worth getting a price for someone else to do for you.

    Premier Icon nuke
    Subscriber

    Slightly different approach, i use a Makita cordless reciprocating saw using standard lxt 18v batteries; already had 18v batteries so just bought the body..with various blade options, lots of uses aside gardening duties and also useful for trail building/maintenance

    Premier Icon djflexure
    Subscriber

    I would not hedgetrim with a chainsaw – its just the wrong tool. Hedge trimmers work fine. Worx do a battery powered jobthat cuts our lower hedges. For the above head height then I get somebody in rather than wobble about on a ladder.

    Kit
    Member

    Whatever you buy, at the very least get yourself a pair of chainsaw trousers/chaps, boots and eyewear. And watch some vids on proper chainsaw safety! They’re not be **** around with.

    I would not hedgetrim with a chainsaw – its just the wrong tool.

    This is the right tool. The Black and decker Alligator. All the benefits of a tiny chainsaw without the element of danger. I love mine…

    st
    Member

    The hedge is over 30m long and between 1-2 m deep. At the level I want to cut it to there are lots of “knuckles” from which smaller branches have developed after years of pruning to roughly the same height.

    I have corded and cordless hedge trimmers, loppers and a couple of good size Silky saws so all the right kit to do the job more conventionally.

    The issue is that there is a lot of targeted cutting with the loppers and hand saw to deal with the thicker stems before I can get the trimmers in. I’ve just finished cutting the face back to take 20cm or so off which wasn’t too bad but I didn’t have anywhere near as much to do with the stems as I will with taking the top off.

    As The cutting will be around shoulder height there’s no need to climb a ladder.

    What I really need is to catch the guys that use a tractor mounted cutter to maintain the public stuff of the other side (the hedge is outlet boundary between the front of the house and a canal towpath. But there’s never any warning that they’re coming!

    I’d hoped that a chainsaw would cut easily through both the thick and thin growth and as I can get to both sides would only leave a strip in the middle at the wider end.

    This is the right tool. The Black and decker Alligator. All the benefits of a tiny chainsaw

    How big do they cut? My wee Aldi chainsaw will happily cut 8″ logs in a single cut, but I’ve cut much bigger coming from each side.

    Are they not really just loppers?

    Billhook and some string and lay it properly. Will take you most of the rest of your life, mind.

    How big do they cut?

    I chopped up a rowan tree in the garden that was maybe 9” or 10” thick but had to cut from both sides.

    The bar is a bout 6” and It’ll do 4” as a straight lop.

    Combined  with my Titan shredder it’ll eat most of what I need to get shot of in the garden

    Superb, I thought they were only really for a couple of inches.

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