Avoid Being Killed by Watching Where You Are Going (And Wearing Sunglasses!)

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  • Avoid Being Killed by Watching Where You Are Going (And Wearing Sunglasses!)
  • Premier Icon D0NK
    Subscriber

    “Dazzling sun” played a part in 2,233 car crashes excuses for driving like a twunt

    “wearing dark clothes at night” played a part oh dear, sounds suspiciously like blaming the victim to me, either ped didn’t look so got knocked over or it was the motorists fault but he tried to blame dark clothes.

    Rise in cyclist KSI stats is worrying wonder if there are inline with rise in numbers cycling or not.

    Premier Icon GrahamS
    Subscriber

    Interesting story on the BBC discussing the causes or road accidents amongst drivers, cyclists and pedestrians:

    “Failed to look properly” was the biggest reason of all, reported in 42% of all accidents.

    51 cyclists crashed because of a “dazzling sun”.
    “Dazzling sun” played a part in 2,233 car crashes

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/business-19746515

    Premier Icon Mr Agreeable
    Subscriber

    Road.cc have a bit more of a breakdown:

    http://road.cc/content/news/67386-dft-release-2011-annual-report-road-casualties

    Not surprisingly, cyclists seem to have more of an incentive to keep their eyes on the road than drivers.

    The increase in casualties is in line with the increase in cycling, which does raise the question of where the much-vaunted “safety in numbers” effect is supposed to kick in.

    Premier Icon D0NK
    Subscriber

    don’t think anyone said S-I-N would be immediate mrA

    rush hours most dangerous for cycling, no surprises.
    rise in drink driving, 280 deaths 🙁
    presumably the 6,000+ none traffic cylists include some of us lot getting carried off a mountain/trail centre?

    Premier Icon Northwind
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    Hopefully it goes without saying that cycling crashes are very under-reported because there’s no insurance companies etc involved- they’ll only make the stats here where there’s an injury or another person involved.

    Premier Icon Mr Agreeable
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    CTC’s line is that safety-in-numbers effect is being overridden by the government being slack on motorists, which seems a bit feeble. If there’s a connection between postponing the increase in fuel duty and cars hitting cyclists, it eludes me.

    Junkyard
    Member

    CTC having evangelical zeal despite the evidence SURELY NOT

    Where is TJ when you need to make sense of stuff like this 😥

    Premier Icon Mr Agreeable
    Subscriber

    I totally applaud the efforts of anyone who campaigns for more cycling,a and yes there’s a massive need to make roads safer for cycling, but when they talk about places like Holland and Denmark being safer to cycle as a result of the number of cyclists, they’re missing a trick.

    I know that it’s traditional in these threads to link to a cycling blog which backs up your views, but this is well worth a read:

    http://crapwalthamforest.blogspot.co.uk/2011/02/what-wont-bring-about-mass-cycling-6.html

    Premier Icon unklehomered
    Subscriber

    Why would I be killed by watching where I was going? Or my sunglasses? Oh god I have 5 pairs of sunglasses!!! They’re everywhere!!!

    ##reads post##

    Oh right…

    matt_bl
    Member

    MrA,

    I’m sure he makes some valid points, but I decided not to read any further after this point below.

    Of much more interest are trends – changes which are consistent year after year. Here are some trends. In 2002 the annual total of ALL cycling casualties was 17,107 and in 2009 it was 17,064.

    Premier Icon mikewsmith
    Subscriber

    Wearing dark clothes at night is not blaming the victim it’s pointing out that it’s stupid to not be visible at night

    TuckerUK
    Member

    Did they cover twazzock pedestrians you walk on the wrong side of the roas where there is no pavement?

    Increasingly seeing more of that around here. National speed limit road with no pavements, tall hedgerow either side, blind corner, pedestrain on your side unaware of your presence because they’re not walking facing the direction of traffic.

    Premier Icon GrahamS
    Subscriber

    which does raise the question of where the much-vaunted “safety in numbers” effect is supposed to kick in.

    My understanding is that it is visible on more local levels, as many of the significant cycling increases are regional.

    Nationally we’ve not really seen a significant increase – the actual numbers of people cycling regularly as transport are still pitifully low.

    Premier Icon Mr Agreeable
    Subscriber

    matt_bl – Member
    MrA,

    I’m sure he makes some valid points, but I decided not to read any further after this point below.

    What’s wrong with that? Yes I know the CTC will argue that increased casualty figures are down to an increase in cycling and distance cycled, but applying the safety-in-numbers logic you’d expect a drop, not a static figure.

    TuckerUK
    Member

    Wearing dark clothes at night is not blaming the victim…

    Yes it is.

    Just like saying a paraleticly drunk naked girl/boy perhaps shouldn’t go and stand in the dark alley at 3am is, or saying the multimillionaire shouldn’t go into the ghetto wearing all his jewellery whilst carrying a bundle of £50 notes and the latest notepad and iPhone.

    You’re a nasty nasty person. 😉

    Premier Icon Mr Agreeable
    Subscriber

    My understanding is that it is visible on more local levels, as many of the significant cycling increases are regional.

    In that case London should be among the safest places, but it’s oddly absent from the CTC’s campaign literature.

    http://www.ctc.org.uk/resources/Campaigns/CTC_Safety_in_Numbers.pdf

    drlex
    Member

    MrTucker,
    Here’s a good twazzock pedestrian who was doing his best to get run down:
    pillock

    mikeconnor
    Member

    Safety in numbers you say? Good idea. I think I’ll do that tonight actually. 6.30, on the South bank next to Waterloo bridge, anyone?

    Premier Icon D0NK
    Subscriber

    Wearing dark clothes at night is not blaming the victim…

    I disagree, do you wear a high viz vest whenever they leave the house after dark? Going for midnight walks on roads in the middle of nowhere some bright clothing would be a good idea. Nipping across the road to the pub/shop/your mates…seriously? Wearing dark clothes is contributory? cobblers.

    SkillWill
    Member

    MrTucker,
    Here’s a good twazzock pedestrian who was doing his best to get run down:
    pillock

    Odd video. Could have been someone in need of help?

    Junkyard
    Member

    those were my thoughts – wanted help or to rob you I would have locked the doors but stopped personally.

    drlex
    Member

    Did a U turn where it was safe & went back to check. Seen hoofing away through hedgerow- think he was just off his face and thought that waving a car down for a lift was a bright move. Lucky it wasn’t his last one.

    Premier Icon Mr Agreeable
    Subscriber

    I reckon he was a dandy highwayman and by courageously driving away at top speed you escaped being asked to stand and deliver.

    Premier Icon irc
    Subscriber

    Going for midnight walks on roads in the middle of nowhere some bright clothing would be a good idea. Nipping across the road to the pub/shop/your mates…seriously? Wearing dark clothes is contributory? cobblers.

    Well exactly. Whether dark clothing is a factor depends on the circumstances. I know of one fatality a couple of miles from me where the deceased ped was walking in the middle of the road (rural, no pavements, no streetlights) with his back to traffic.

    He was wearing a black jacket. I think with light or reflective clothing on he might still be alive today. This was around 2am after he had been at a social function all night. I don’t know if alcohol was a factor.

    teasel
    Member

    Wearing dark clothes at night is not blaming the victim it’s pointing out that it’s stupid to not be visible at night

    In reality it makes little difference what colour your riding garment is, it’s reflectivity and illumination that makes you visible to other road users.

    Premier Icon irc
    Subscriber

    In reality it makes little difference what colour your riding garment is, it’s reflectivity and illumination that makes you visible to other road users.

    But the dark clothing comment referred to peds not cyclists. Are you saying a white jacket isn’t anymore visible at night than a black jacket?

    From the linked BBC piece

    but it was actually pedestrians who suffered the biggest rise in deaths last year, up 12% to 453.

    More were seriously hurt too, up from 5,200 in 2010 to 5,454 last year.

    “Pedestrian failed to look properly” was a factor in 59% of those accidents, and is easily the biggest single reason why pedestrians got hurt.

    Parked vehicles blocking the view helped cause 16% of those injuries, and for 824 people who got hurt (about 4% of the total), “wearing dark clothes at night” played a part.

    Premier Icon jameso
    Subscriber

    “Dazzling sun” played a part in 2,233 car crashes

    Or more accurately perhaps, was the excuse in many insurance claims. A wasp in the car, a spider, anything like that can get you off running someone over.

    teasel
    Member

    But the dark clothing comment referred to peds not cyclists. Are you saying a white jacket isn’t anymore visible at night than a black jacket?

    You’re correct; I was thinking cyclists when I wrote the post. But in answer to your question, naturally a white jacket would reflect more light than a black jacket but not sure whether it makes much difference when illuminated by a dipped beam which only seems to light-up clothing beneath the waist IME. Full beam is an entirely different matter, of course.

    But seriously – white jackets ? Didn’t we have enough of that in the eighties…

    Premier Icon GrahamS
    Subscriber

    Why don’t they require all cars to be fluorescent?

    Surely that would hugely reduce the number of car-on-car SMIDSYs? 😉

    Premier Icon Kryton57
    Subscriber

    I feel the need remind some of the posters here know that there’s a resaon why ninja’s and the SAS wear dark clothes at night.

    That is all.

    Premier Icon binners
    Subscriber

    Wearing dark clothes at night is not blaming the victim it’s pointing out that it’s stupid to not be visible at night

    Cobblers! All my riding gear is black or dark colours. I don’t believe the colour of your clothes makes one bit of difference. Both myself and the bike are however lit up like a christmas tree. Thats what gets you seen. Not dressing like Don Johnson….

    😉

    Premier Icon Mr Agreeable
    Subscriber

    I feel the need remind some of the posters here know that there’s a resaon why ninja’s and the SAS wear dark clothes at night.

    Is it so that if they get run over a bunch of uninformed strokers can write sneery things about them?

    Premier Icon GrahamS
    Subscriber

    I feel the need remind some of the posters here know that there’s a resaon why ninja’s and the SAS wear dark clothes at night.

    Why would ninjas or the SAS want to get run down?

    Premier Icon Mr Agreeable
    Subscriber

    For everyone who reckons that the answer to road safety is making everyone dress like they’re on their way to a Klaxons concert, bear in mind that it’s quite possible to “see” something but not have it processed by the brain. The “looked but failed to see” phenomenon is well-documented.

    Looked But Failed To See Errors

    teasel
    Member

    …there’s a resaon why ninja’s and the SAS wear dark clothes at night.

    Even at night I believe it depends on terrain as to what the SAS wear. And aside from the ‘fact’ that ninja may never have existed at all (instead, I believe, being based on masked rogue samurai mercenaries or some such), it’s only the Hollywood image that puts them togged-up to the eyeballs in hooded ebony pyjamas.

    And neither ride bikes as far as I know. Well, at least not in action…

    teasel
    Member

    My mistake…

    cheez0
    Member

    I struggle with long sentences.

    when going outside after dark there are two well known hazards that the average person should mitigate for every time.

    bad drivers and zombies.

    you KNOW that you are likely to be run over by a stupid SMIDSY driver so you must help them to see you, and also help yourself avoid being inconveniently dead, by wearing something bright.

    For Zombies, you need a chainsaw.

    If you come off worse in a confrontation with either, without heeding this sound advice, you must accept some of the blame.

    RichPenny
    Member

    Increasingly seeing more of that around here. National speed limit road with no pavements, tall hedgerow either side, blind corner, pedestrain on your side unaware of your presence because they’re not walking facing the direction of traffic.

    If they could see you coming at 60mph, WTAF do you expect them to do? Dive into the hedge? Not arguing that it’s a particularly sensible place to be walking, more that it doesn’t particularly matter which side of the road you’re on in that scenario.

    Premier Icon garage-dweller
    Subscriber

    Nice pic. Not as stealth as some cycle commuters though. Personally wouldn’t wear exclusively black or grey anywhere other than the hills. Whatever the rights and wrongs i would choose to help myself and take the excuses away. Black or grey outfit across a small surface area (eg a cyclist seen from behind) on a similar coloured background is not that helpful when you are sharing road space especially at dusk. Co existence on the road does require all types of user to give and take and do what they can to accommodate each other. The fact that most drivers are unhelpful twits should not stop cyclists doing what they can to protect themselves in my view.

    Premier Icon garage-dweller
    Subscriber

    Something no one mentions about Holland is the degree of segregation of cyclists from main traffic and the brilliant road design that many junctions have to control motor traffic (speed, direction and road position). My experience of dutch drivers while driving there on holiday last year was they are not that much nicer or competent than their British counterparts. With that in mind I certainly believe safety in numbers is in part at least driven by public infrastructure spending that is justified by the higher user numbers rather than exclusively volume itself. Of course where numbers and density is as high as it is in places like Amsterdam then car use falls but we are a looooong way off that!

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