Australian Sheepdog

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  • Australian Sheepdog
  • GregMay
    Member

    Ok so I spent two days at Crufts over the weekend with my partner. Never been before, unreal, what an excellent way to get to see all the dogs you’ve been thinking about owning. Like a massive bike show but more interactive 🙂

    So I’ve been debating the eternal trail dog/running dog question for a while and have thought more and more about an Australian Sheepdog. Don’t want a Collie, don’t want a Springer (yet), but want a dog that can work up to longer runs and rides. Spent an inordinate amount of time talking the woman at the stands ear off about them, she was only happy to talk, but I felt bad for anyone else who had questions!

    So do we have any owners? Any actual info from people who’ve had them? And just for ‘aawwwwww’ sake:

    z1ppy
    Member

    Not an owner, but a friend has two, incredibly intelligent and incredibly active… and and mean incredibly on both counts.
    Dogs obviously need a lot of commitment, but aussies need more as they get bored really easily.

    No doubt I’m just repeating what you were told, but it’s worth repeating it. Bored dogs get frustrated and cause issues..

    Premier Icon maccruiskeen
    Subscriber

    Thats not an Aussie Sheepdog

    This is an Aussie Sheepdog

    Premier Icon scaredypants
    Subscriber

    is that Uluru, the giant sheepdog, astride Ayers Rock ?

    smiffy
    Member

    I have a Welsh Collie/Kelpie and he does not go well with the bike.

    Premier Icon darrell
    Subscriber

    you need to see “Marmaduke” the movie

    GregMay
    Member

    @z1ppy – yeah, aware that they need a lot of attention, somewhat like myself! Hence the choice. Would be living in a house with an ultra runner and a MTBer who errs towards the longer side of riding. I know that a pup would need to grow into these, but long time to get there! Other experience with dogs was Springers….oh dear how nuts they are

    @maccruiskeen – they did mention how they worked better when inverted.

    z1ppy
    Member

    I knew I’d only be repeating what you’d have been told but it worth repeating, great dogs though.

    Other experience with dogs was Springers….oh dear how nuts they are

    Very, and we only have a half springer/half lab, not the best combo.

    I’m surprised no one picked up on the fact that I said an aussie’s can be very intelligent…. 😈

    richc
    Member

    after owning an incredibility active, and bright working dog cross (mines a Chesapeake cross). I think its worth emphasising the incredibility bit.

    These types of dogs are meant to have constant company and be given lots of things to do. So unless you can commit 3 hours + a day to exercising and training them, you are going to be replacing a lot of chewed up broken furniture and are going to get very very pissed off with the dog. They have been selectively bred to be bright and tireless workers, and that energy has to be directed somewhere.

    Mine for example, until he was 3 would happily empty the contents of several wardrobes into my hall and chewed off several dado rails off entire rooms when he was left at home alone for a few hours a day and this destructive behaviour was after having a minimuim of 3 hours worth of walks a day (running, walking or chasing a bike) and lots and lots of training.

    Just to warn you.

    @z1ppy – yeah, aware that they need a lot of attention, somewhat like myself! Hence the choice. Would be living in a house with an ultra runner and a MTBer who errs towards the longer side of riding.

    The running will be fine, the long long rides however may kill the dogs hips plus you will have to be giving it lots and lots of water. As whilst the dog can go all day, it cannot sprint all day, which when following a bike it could be running much faster than its all day pace.

    Mine would run all day following a bike, but I wouldn’t dream of making him follow me for more than 3 1/2 hours as the dog will kill itself trying to keep up, and I wouldn’t want to hurt him.

    Premier Icon deadslow
    Subscriber

    Are you positive you don’t want a Springer. This is our 11 month old (spayed 3 weeks ago) but the happiest face in the world

    Except when she wants to go out and play and I am working on my computer/posting stuff on STW.

    GregMay
    Member

    @richC – Great info thanks! Aware that they need lots of time, thankfully working in academia allows me…shall we say flexible daytime hours at the least. Agree with the riding side, I’d not think of running/sprinting a dog for that long, Would be inclined to ride from the house on trails, do a loop then drop him/her off. I run a lot also (both triathletes also) so would be possible for us to get dog out a few times in a day if needed. Training wise, we were talking about this and we’re both interested in doing some training, and down the line events with the dog, she was even talking about seeing if we could do some agility trials. Would be great! But a few years out.

    So that was going to be my next question on sex. Any difference in endurance or activeness?

    @deadslow – Springer is my ‘fallback’ (??) dog. They are so much fun, perfect for us, we just want something different I suppose!

    richc
    Member

    I haven’t owned a sheepdog breed, but my experience of dogs compared to bitches is bitches are smaller and more clingy and Dogs are bigger and tend to roam (a little more independent) plus they are keener on mounting every other dog they meet.

    Personally, my next dog will be a bitch as hauling your dog off every other male can become a right PITA and some owners of other dogs really really don’t like it, even if there dog does (because it ain’t right! apparently)

    GregMay
    Member

    Oh to be a dog and be able to get up on everything…

    Ok, good to know, was thinking a bitch myself anyway.

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