• This topic has 19 replies, 12 voices, and was last updated 4 days ago by chewkw.
Viewing 20 posts - 1 through 20 (of 20 total)
  • Asian fire/barbecue cooking
  • molgrips
    Full Member

    Camping at the weekend a group of Asian young adults arrived who I think, based on a guess re their language may have been Vietnamese. They brought out a load of meat and veg and cooked a big proper meal, using some device I’d never seen before.

    It was small and portable sized of course, and seemed to have a fire in the bottom and a conical chimney about 30cm long and 20cm wide. The food was cooking in a sort of gutter around the base of the chimney.

    Anyone know what this could be and what cuisine it’s from?

    Pyro
    Full Member

    Probably something like an old-fashioned Mongolian Hot-Pot*?

    (*Dunno if that’s the proper term, but it’s a term I know.)

    retrorick
    Full Member

    Looks like a Kelly kettle for food?

    VanHalen
    Full Member

    they definately up teh ante when it comes to teh humble barbequeue! i was walking with my daughter through the parks in sheffield and the smells and contraptions creating them were just amazing! – i was well jealous.

    Pyro
    Full Member

    Looks like a Kelly kettle for food?

    Bit like, yeah. The way I’ve seen them used in the past was broth in the ‘gutter’ heated by contact with the chimney, then you dangle thinly sliced bits of meat, veg etc into the hot broth to cook them through. The broth gets more flavoursome as time goes on!

    eddiebaby
    Full Member

    There’s quite a few on Amazon and ebay. Look like a spicy fondue set. Brilliant! Never noticed them before. Quite a few YouTube guides and recipes as well

    ads678
    Full Member

    Ooh, I like the look of those. Might have to get one.

    stwhannah
    Full Member

    If anyone finds a good one please stick a link in here!

    chewkw
    Free Member

    They brought out a load of meat and veg and cooked a big proper meal, using some device I’d never seen before.

    LOL! I don’t think they are BBQ-ing.

    This type of cooking is very popular in the far east countries. Rather healthy too because they use very little oil but … I like to add MSG otherwise blunt. Yammy!

    As above that is the conical shape chimney cooker they are using. You can buy them from Chinese supermarket or Vietnamese shop.

    The most important aspect of this cooking is the soup or the base soup to flavour whatever they are cooking. You can buy the soup base/paste from Chinese Supermarket but a word of warning, they love spicy super hot chili based soup and most of the soup are chili based. Hence red in colour. LOL!

    Once the soup has boiled they add the fresh ingredients to the soup to cook and the soup adds flavour to the food. Depending on what they are cooking individual will either dip the food into the boiling soup and cook to their individual liking, or simply let the food to boil. The more they cook the more the soup taste will change accordingly and the soup will reduce and you need to top it up again plus to add more soup base.

    This sort of cooking is meant for gathering or amongst few friends.

    If you ask me if I like this sort of cooking … I hate it. LOL! Once my mainland Chinese friends invited me to a dinner with this type of cooking I just found the food blunt tbh, but for my Chinese friends they were in high heavens!

    Give it a go and you might like it.

    molgrips
    Full Member

    Yes, that!

    Is it a Mongolian thing or pan-Asian or what?

    chewkw
    Free Member

    Yes, that!

    Is it a Mongolian thing or pan-Asian or what?

    Widespread use in the far east especially China. i.e. from Mongolia to Indo China to SE Asia (Chinese descendants). I think originally it came from the North China because cooking could double up as “central heating”. Traditionally, Mongols prefer proper BBQ because of their nomadic lifestyle.

    sofaman
    Full Member

    Yup – soupy stuff in Myanmar:

    boondock
    Full Member

    I’m familiar with that contraption as a Beijing hotpot, a few lumps of charcoal down the chimney, the outside is filled with water which boils due to the charcoal. You then dunk all sorts of thinly sliced meat into the water for a few seconds to poach. Had an amazing night in Beijing eating and drinking in a very ‘local’ restaurant – happy days – pre-covid obvs…

    chewkw
    Free Member

    You then dunk all sorts of thinly sliced meat into the water for a few seconds to poach.

    No MSG no taste good to me. LOL!

    Did they use MSG?

    boondock
    Full Member

    Not a clue! It was the type of restaurant where it was best not to ask about the provenance of the ingredients or their source!

    chewkw
    Free Member

    Not a clue! It was the type of restaurant where it was best not to ask about the provenance of the ingredients or their source!

    LOL! If the soup base is heavily spiced then No MSG needed but if no spice then MSG a must. LOL!

    I remember my parents would refer to this sort of northern food (our ancestors are from the south) as food for the “country pumpkins” LOL!

    Oh ya … the thinly slice beef has to be sliced semi-frozen otherwise they cannot be paper thin.

    Kryton57
    Full Member

    I went to a Mongolian barbecue in Chester once a few years ago.

    chewkw
    Free Member

    I went to a Mongolian barbecue in Chester once a few years ago.

    I have only tried the wannabe Mongolian food once. It was just a simple bowl of beef noodles cooked by a young chap in the far east, edible. I suspect the authentic Mongolian food will be very nice. Not just their bbq but they also cook differently, depending on the region they come from.

    Earl
    Free Member

    You will see it referred to as a Steamboat at many restaurants.

    Make sure you do it with good friends. There is inevitable flow back.

    chewkw
    Free Member

    There is inevitable flow back.

    What do you mean by that? LOL!

    Yes, some reuse … LOL! But those are the naughty ones

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