Are we going to have much of a high street left after all this?

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  • Are we going to have much of a high street left after all this?
  • Premier Icon molgrips
    Subscriber

    Well, I’ve got a fair few LBS. Some are great, I shop at those. Others are rubbish, I don’t shop there and I wouldn’t mind if they went under. The better shops can take their staff and their business.

    Isn’t that how it’s meant to work?

    PeterPoddy
    Member

    Don’t believe everything you read in the Daily Mail or see on the tele…..

    I haven’t bought any newspaper for about 3 years and I don’t watch news as a rule. That was a pure observation.

    plecostomus
    Member

    Shirley with all these shops ie hmv, jessops etc going under partly through things like people buying on line with the likes of amazon,play.com etc this is creating less competition and will then allow them to charge whatever they want as there will be less other places for you to buy those goods?

    Premier Icon maccruiskeen
    Subscriber

    Shirley with all these shops ie hmv, jessops etc going under partly through things like people buying on line with the likes of amazon,play.com etc this is creating less competition and will then allow them to charge whatever they want as there will be less other places for you to buy those goods?

    You’ve worked that out then? 🙂

    plecostomus
    Member

    I sure have, Ive got lots of free time on my hands at the moment!

    Premier Icon Flaperon
    Subscriber

    We’ve no one to blame but ourselves (actually, being in my twenties I can blame everyone older than me, but I digress).

    We allowed chains to monopolise the high street. We allowed the councils to implement punitive rates and parking (they are elected, after all), and we chose to shop in these doomed stores until we found the internet.

    European cities don’t have this problem because it’s not about the shops; it’s about socialising. They have effective, cheap public transport and safe cycling. In Amsterdam, the only shops allowed off public squares are bars, cafés, restaurants etc because the authorities understand this.

    We’re incapable of seeing this in the UK, and to be honest, when the last few chains are gone and the street is just a row of bookies, pawnbrokers, pound shops, halal butchers, and charity shops, it’ll be almost impossible to fix.

    The only place I can think of that comes close is Didsbury in South Manchester, which was a great place to live.

    Zulu-Eleven
    Member

    Didn’t Argos post really shit figures recently as well?.

    Thing is, that that is a business with such huge potential, with over 700 locations countrywide, to capitalise on the internet, as with a load of teenagers on mopeds and a few vans they could offer same day delivery in every major town in the country.

    Spongebob
    Member

    We allowed chains to monopolise the high street.

    We?

    Chains have dominated our high streets because shoppers aren’t discerning enough. They regularly flock like sheep and buy the “landfill” on offer, thus perpetuating a cycle of waste, keeping the shelves stocked with uninspiring intangible rubbish.

    My experience of large chain retailing is of overpriced, but often mediocre/inferior merchandise, presented in lavish palaces of consumerism – large modern covered shopping centres.

    The high street is failing because it is not convenient, choice is limited and prices are most often uncompetitive.

    Not convenient because of commercially oblivious imbeciles in town council offices who regard motorists (customers) as a menace, make popping into your local shop virtually impossible without considerable hassle.

    Choice is limited because large stores are scarce and any big chain would keep limited stock. Many chains are put off by limited footfall and high cost per square foot. They don’t have confidence in this traditional and rather outdated type of shopping experience.. The abundance of businesses that deprive shoppers of store frontage interrupting the footfall is also off putting (estate agents, banks, accountants, letting agents, solicitors, too many food outlets, and any other buildings where you can’t buy goods – think how large shopping centres are laid out).

    Smaller retailers cannot make their businesses competitive due to greedy landlords’ high lease costs, uniform business rates that are not sensitive to the local market situation. Councils do not receive this tax, so have little incentive or power to stimulate local commerce. The Internet offers consumers huge choice and it’s easy to buy products at prices below a level that a high street retailer could realistically make any profit.

    Local chambers of commerce are dominated by the local establishment (land owning parish councillors and significant influential business people). So any new entrepreneurs are seen as a threat to the status quo and won’t get anywhere without their approval.

    Converting shops to dwellings will only happen if the high street in question has become a boarded up wasteland, as a body of traders will justifiably oppose the further demise of their shopping centre with great gusto. The local council will also have to provide some residents parking too.

    1) Retailer associations should have much more control of their high street.

    2) I think there should be the relaxing of parking restrictions for short stay.

    3) Business rates collected by local councils and set according to the collective prosperity of the shopping area in question, with dispensation for lower footfall areas. This incentivises the council to work to improve the situation.

    4) Regulation of landlords/lease renewals to prevent them from bleeding tenant shop holders dry. Landlords should feel a sense of duty of care to the local economy!

    5) The whole thing needs managing with all interested parties talking to each other in a collaborative way.

    6) Worst cases subject to some careful government investment – raised on the back of taxes on out of town retailing.

    7) Encouraging large retailers to establish a presence in the high street.

    8 ) Develop a chamber of commerce that is vibrant and dynamic – these guys need shaking up and the men past retirement age should gracefully step down and let new blood take the reins!

    9) No more new shopping malls – the UK has far too many retail outlets.

    10) Rather than convert traditional high streets, some of those old Arndale centre type places should be converted into housing.

    Spongebob
    Member

    I need to get out more!

    ROLL ON SUMMER!!!!!

    Philby
    Member

    I couldn’t believe the number of empty shop units in Bristol city centre when I wandered round today. This included quite a few in the recently opened Cabot Circus shopping centre which was supposed to revitalise the city.

    coffeeking
    Member

    Only thing I ever buy from a “real” shop these days is clothes, coffee, RC things model shops and food. I hate going shopping, always have. I will avoid going to a high street if at all possible. Maybe I’m the epitome of all that’s wrong?

    batfink
    Member

    I hate going shopping, always have. I will avoid going to a high street if at all possible. Maybe I’m the epitome of all that’s wrong?

    I agree. I only realised how much I shopped online since I moved to Australia – there’s not as many internet retailers over here, and so I find myself having to go to the shops more often. It’s rubbish.

    Premier Icon BoardinBob
    Subscriber

    I reckon Millets are on borrowed time. Popped into the Glasgow Sauchiehall Street branch today and on top of an already good sale they had a further 20% off everything. That reeks of liquidity problems.

    They really must struggle to compete against the like of Decathlon etc. The shops are shabby and their range is very limited.

    Premier Icon Blackhound
    Subscriber

    Thought Millets had gone already, it has in Derby I heard. And the Co-Op dept store just up the road (opposite HMV) is closing soon.

    Used to be lots of little shops then big chains took over and could sell more stuff cheaper. People migrated to these stores.

    Now internet is cheaper and people have moved on again. Small shops can’t compete with internet or afford rents in city centres. Already going to pound/charity/coffee shops.

    10-15 years ago very few coffee shops in city now 2 Costa’s, 2 Starbucks, a Nero plus loads of smaller ones including a Cafe Kona!

Viewing 14 posts - 41 through 54 (of 54 total)

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