Viewing 35 posts - 1 through 35 (of 35 total)
  • Are technical super duper waterproofs pointless for MTB in the slop?
  • Premier Icon deanfbm
    Free Member

    Debating not bothering with my fancy technical shells and getting some proper horrible plastic waterproofs instead, once the super duper fabric is wetted out from slop, they’ll behave just the same, right? The cheap nasty stuff actually maybe keeping more filth off the layers underneath, maybe?

    Premier Icon lardman
    Free Member

    Trousers/ cheap (army surplus gore Tex £20)
    Jacket, expensive + breathable. (£1??)

    Mudguard keeps the crap off the jacket to some extent.

    Premier Icon yourguitarhero
    Free Member

    My Endura onsie is excellent. Doesn’t wet out, I don’t get too hot and am clean when I take it off

    Premier Icon gravesendgrunt
    Free Member

    All I know is these do the job for me-for a tenner per season ,all going well .Barely know I’m wearing them as they as so lightweight,not waterproof as such but don’t need to be.I just use a nice full base layer -horrible without.
    Sondico Rain Pants

    Premier Icon trail_rat
    Free Member

    I tried army goretex cutty downs.

    I’d rather not have shorts on than those.

    Baggy in the legs , rubbed in all the wrong places , the waist band had to be set to *cut in half* to not fall down and keep getting caught on the saddle nose.

    My altura drylines that are about 15 years old are miles better I can only imagine most modern MTB shorts would surpass even them never mind army surplus.

    -i guess we can add those to things everyone thinks is great but is actually shite thread.

    Premier Icon lawman91
    Full Member

    Absolutely worth it. Some will swear by the cheaper army gore-tex stuff but its just not the same. The fit is horrific and they just aren’t suitable the magic bullet so many so they are. Have lived in my 7Mesh Revo shorts for the last 2 winters (and even some “summer” riding) and they are without doubt one of the best purchases I’ve made. Excellent fit, keep water at bay with ease and still look like new and will likely continue to do so if the other 7Mesh kit I’ve had longer is anything to go by!

    Premier Icon Nobeerinthefridge
    Free Member

    Is keeping dry really a thing?

    Water gets in eventually, sweat is always there too. I prefer soft shells etc, some decent layering, good gloves and footwear etc, just accept I’ll get wet, but I’ll be warm as well.

    Only time I use proper shells are at height, where windchill is the enemy.

    Premier Icon Northwind
    Full Member

    I totally wear by my altura attack waterproof shorts, I’ve had less breathable shorts and I’ve had less waterproof shorts and neither was worth a damn.

    I try to avoid waterproof jackets- no matter what, they’re sweaty- but in proper ugly conditions a good technical fabric is still head and shoulders above a basic binbag jacket.

    Premier Icon gixernick
    Full Member

    Endura Singletrack trousers have been my latest winter discovery. Fairly water proof breathable and warm enough without over heating.

    Premier Icon frogstomp
    Full Member

    Endura MT500 Spray pants kept me dry and comfortable in temperatures just above zero in sloppy conditions at the Golfie weekend before last.. very happy with them.

    Premier Icon Big-Bud
    Full Member

    I’ve killed many a waterproof garment by washing them
    Even if using a dedicated cleaner and cleaning the machine out first it strips the dwr protection off so now I hose it down and deal with the dirt .
    I also bought a light weight Berghaus and it’s better than any MTB specific jacket I’ve used in recent times
    Regarding the endura onesie which is north of £400 how do you look after that ? Do you wash it and does\has that compromised the waterproofness at all .

    Premier Icon Northwind
    Full Member

    Big-Bud

    Member

    I’ve killed many a waterproof garment by washing them

    Especially important for shorts, this. For whatever reason, my Alturas don’t care, i just machine wash them as usual. They’re not as water repellant as they used to be but they’re still waterproof after years of use.

    Premier Icon clubby
    Full Member

    Material matters up to a point but cut is way more important on the bike.
    Not convinced by the new Gore shake dry stuff for MTB use, can’t see it being too durable. My old 2.5 layer gore bike is still great 16 years on.

    Premier Icon epicyclo
    Full Member

    The best breathable waterproofs for a bike start with decent mudguards…

    When you look at the tread on a mtb, it’s hard to think of a better way to simulate a hose of muddy water at the rider when at speed.

    Plus technical wear breathes better if it isn’t clagged up, and you don’t wear out the arse of an expensive pair of shorts in a season.

    Premier Icon spooky_b329
    Full Member

    Definitely a vote for technical waterproofs. I rode in horrendous weather last weekend, got home and got in the shower wearing everything but my shoes. Washed all the mud off and my top half was still dry even after spraying it with the shower 🙂 Normally I’d have worn Altura waterproof shorts but the weather forecast was wrong, so I was soaked from the waist down.

    I’d rather get wet than get soaked in sweat wearing a cheap mac.

    Premier Icon altrezia
    Free Member

    Some running leggings, random shorts and a t-shirt.. what’s wrong with that? Easy to wash, light weight, was fine today in the grim rain and mud.

    Premier Icon yourguitarhero
    Free Member

    With the onesie, I wear it and hose myself down. Maybe use a sponge to get mud off.
    Doesn’t go near detergent.

    I also managed to get it for £250 new off an LBS on eBay. Expensive, but a bit more palatable.

    The trouser part makes the most difference – catches all the puddle spray. I wear waterproof hiking boots from decathlon too

    Premier Icon chiefgrooveguru
    Free Member

    “The best breathable waterproofs for a bike start with decent mudguards…”

    Win a prize if you can fit a decent rear mudguard to a 29er with 150mm of travel and a 185mm dropper post!

    Premier Icon ton
    Free Member

    Win a prize if you can fit a decent rear mudguard to a 29er with 150mm of travel and a 185mm dropper post!

    if you need to drop your post nearly 200mm to ride it, you need a smaller bike.

    Premier Icon Van Halen
    Free Member

    You need a mudhugger chief?

    Have you even got 200mm legs? You aren’t that tall ?!? 😉

    I use a arse save to keep the worst of the grinding paste off the arse of my waterproofs. And only hand wash in plain water.

    Premier Icon Garry_Lager
    Full Member

    A cheap impermeable in the back pocket is a reasonable set up – good soft shell be fine for 95% of stuff but if it starts properly raining with bad intentions, then put on the outer layer. Obv need to get one that will pack up small.

    Rarely wear shorts, but the one’s I’ve owned have always got the aris worn out in short order. It’s like the Peak gritstone must make its way into the mud – a ride is equivalent to rubbing the back of them with an abrading tool for 3 hours.
    Army goretex best from this perspective – cheap, waterproof, but don’t expect a tailored fit as others have mentioned.

    Premier Icon Scienceofficer
    Free Member

    if you need to drop your post nearly 200mm to ride it, you need a smaller bike.

    What a sweet old-fashioned notion.

    It’s not that fancy-dan multiple hundreds of pounds waterproofs don’t work for MTB, it’s just they’re (IMO) poor value.

    They rarely function well for long, and mostly, even when operating at their best, still get overwhelmed by a sweaty mtber.

    Shortly thereafter they don’t work at their best because they’re covered in filth, are crashed and otherwise abraided.

    In fairly short order you get something very expensive that doesn’t function anything like it could have done.

    Premier Icon stevextc
    Free Member

    All the stuff about washing etc. above … but the main point for me is am I going to buy something expensive that could potentially be written off in a single crash. This is double for me as I* can’t justify me keeping drier and Jnr not and his riding kit has more holes and patches than original material.

    Premier Icon BillOddie
    Full Member

    Like most things…it depends…

    Do you crash much? Do you have lots of brambles round your way?  Do you sweat a lot? Do you run hot or cold? Are you budget minded?

    For me (A bit, Yes, Yes, Hot, Yes) I find that proper waterproofs are too hot and sweaty most of the time (even when hill walking), A softshell with a baselayer underneath or a baselayer, long sleeve jersey and gilet combo works better for me unless it’s sheeting down.

    That being said I do have Proper Waterproof (not super breathable) either in a back pocket or in my hydration pack if heading out in changeable conditions just in case.

    Premier Icon hooli
    Free Member

    Like billodie says, I tried a fancy Gore wateproof and second time out I crashed hard and made a mess of it. All my other MTB clothing has rips from brambles so I suspect it was only a matter of time before it got trashed.

    I also wasn’t sure how much good having a breathable layer was when I wore a pack all the time anyway.

    Now I just wear a few layers with a jersey on top, I do keep a cheap, plasticy waterproof in my pack in case I need to stay dry while fixing a mechanical or if I crash.

    Premier Icon benp1
    Full Member

    This is one of the reasons I bought the Columbia Outdry jacket. It’s not the most breathable jacket in the world but it’s not bad, has pit zips and most importantly doens’t have a DWR that can wear off. So I now don’t have to worry about it staying waterproof, have a few jackets that have been killed by MTB

    I use mudguards front and rear, though my front one isn’t as good as my previous front one as it attached to the fork and provided full coverage, my carbon fork doesn’t provide the same option (both rigid)

    Premier Icon frogstomp
    Full Member

    On the subject of crashing / damage Endura have a Garment Repair Service.

    Premier Icon Scienceofficer
    Free Member

    My main solution has been to buy last season’s jackets at significant markdown, and then, to hardly wear them.

    I favour water resistant wind proofs for 95% of my riding.

    I save the waterproof for when it’s properly tamping down or for big mountain days when being waterproof is important as a safety factor.

    Premier Icon chiefgrooveguru
    Free Member

    “if you need to drop your post nearly 200mm to ride it, you need a smaller bike.”

    I don’t need to, but I do like to.

    “Have you even got 200mm legs? You aren’t that tall ?!? 😉”

    I appear to have the legs and arms of a tall person – as I notice if I try to ride anyone’s bike who is my height and keep trying to make the dropper post go up more!

    Premier Icon Northwind
    Full Member

    stevextc

    Member

    All the stuff about washing etc. above … but the main point for me is am I going to buy something expensive that could potentially be written off in a single crash.

    TBH though writing off kit in a single crash is hard. All of my waterproof stuff has been crashed in, multiple times, I’ve only ever written off one pair of shorts from damage and they were pretty old. You can get goretex repair patches, or you can just ignore it.

    Premier Icon trail_rat
    Free Member

    Maybe Steve rides in a flint slate quarry.

    Premier Icon mariner
    Free Member

    Never found anything as good as the Peter Storm waterproof over trousers.
    It has to be proper monsoon conditions and never first choice when packing for a trip but have worn them round Dartmoor (does it ever stop raining) southern loop in December.
    Baggy flappy got nothing going for them but brilliant in the right conditions.

    Premier Icon Mattbike
    Full Member

    Second for army goretex here. I sew on two Velcro tabs top and bottom on the calf area to reign them in for riding. Can be baggy if not strapped down. I find them breathable on rides.

    Premier Icon BadlyWiredDog
    Full Member

    I favour water resistant wind proofs for 95% of my riding.

    I save the waterproof for when it’s properly tamping down or for big mountain days when being waterproof is important as a safety factor.

    Mostly this, except on the road which is less demanding of breathability ime than mountain biking.

    Also, outdoor brands tend to use better fabrics, design and tec than bike brands which – with the exception of 7Mesh and Gore Bikewear and a few others – seem to be price-point stuff. Kit aimed at ‘fast and light’ outdoors use or trail running generally works well for mountain biking ime, but tends to be expensive. Sportpursuit is your friend if you have a half-price Arc’teryx habit 🙂

    Joking aside, the outdoor market seems to tolerate more expensive clothing than the bike side, maybe because walkers / climbers still have some money left not having blown £5k or so on a carbon fibre full suspension mega-bike 😉

    Premier Icon philjunior
    Free Member

    Yes and no.

    Yes because they help keep you dry.

    No because nothing is ever going to keep you dry in *all* conditions. Breathable != magically transporting buckets of sweat away from your body when you should be wearing less underneath.

    Would’ve though that apart from the fit of them, army surplus gore tex everything should work fine. I tend to take a jacket that’s as packable as possible, and don’t usually bother with waterproof shorts though.

Viewing 35 posts - 1 through 35 (of 35 total)

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