Archbishop Rowan Williams

Viewing 40 posts - 41 through 80 (of 163 total)
  • Archbishop Rowan Williams
  • richc
    Member

    Murdoch is hardly likely to allow Criticism of his investment is he?

    Murdoch has spend a lot of time and money getting the Tories into power, so now its time to cash in he isn’t going to risk muddying the water by broadcasting dissenting views.

    Lifer
    Member

    richc – Member
    No but they seem to fund a hell of a lot more aid charities than any Atheist organisations.

    “Seem to”. Good enough for me.

    When I get to the bottom I go back to the top of the slide

    gonefishin
    Member

    So whilst Charity isn’t the sole reserve of Religion, Religion does seem to encourage charity, more than belief in oneself and nothing else.

    You know that really is rather insulting and not really in keeping with the teachings of Christianity. Of course there are charities such as Oxfam, Save the Children and the Red Cross (some of which you may have heard of) that as far as I can find have any specific religious ties.

    richc
    Member

    “Seem to”. Good enough for me.

    Ah, the typical Atheist argument of ‘prove it’.

    I am not sure if its just me but it just seem to be used to stifle discussion/action to me, as when you have to prove and qualify everything nothing ever happens …. Seems to be the ideal religion for apathetic’s or lawyers to me.

    1 – 0 to the God botherers IMHO…… and that really pisses me off.

    richc
    Member

    Oxfam: Oxfam originated as a church affiliated food aid program in Melbourne.

    Save the Children: Historians have since connected the overwhelming success of Save Our Children with the organization of conservative Christian participation in political processes

    I will give you the Red Cross, as even though a lot of founders (and funders) were staunch Christians, they understood that the organisation needed to be politically, nationality and religiously independent in order to function effectively.

    j_me
    Member

    Oxfam was originally a Quaker organisation, and from Oxford.
    Oxford Committee for Famine Relief

    Premier Icon binners
    Subscriber

    Oxfam invented oats?

    nickf
    Member

    Yeah you can provide extreme examples, but the majority of religious people have nothing to do with that. I dunno, I’m not saying I’m sure about it – I just wonder what is there left in society that goes against the might of advertising, big business etc that encourages us to be selfish materialistic arseholes.

    It’s easy (very, very easy) to pick holes in the Christian doctrine, and I’m sure it’s the same in other religions. There are so many inconsistencies and contradictions that anyone who’s a believer should be seriously questioning what it is that they purport to support.

    The vast majority of people who call themselves Christians and who attend church regularly have no real idea about their own religion. They go along with the idea that stealing from people is bad, being nasty is, y’know, not really a good idea, and that we should probably give money to help those less fortunate than ourselves.

    But that’s not specific to Christianity (other religions are available). It’s just basic humanity. Look at what Leviticus says, for example, and ask Christians to support that, and they’d almost all refuse to. But there it is, part of your religion. Right there, it states, categorically, that homosexuality is banned, and that gays should be put to death. It also states that Christians shouldn’t eat pork or shellfish, that you can keep slaves….lots of other stuff that virtually no-one whould go along with. So do you just accept the bits you like and say that the rest is wrong? If you take the stance that it was interpreted by men, and that times have changed, then you’ve got a problem as well, because that means that anything’s up for grabs.

    Ask most Christians – churchgoing Christians – to name you the Ten Commandments, and they’d typically get about half. A survey I saw maybe a decade ago reckoned that only around 25% of Christian clergy could name them all.

    So what you have is an Archbishop criticising a government, based on the fact that he’s got 2-3m supporters, despite the fact that 90+% of said supporters have little real idea of what their religion really stands for. Other than ‘Jesus was a kinda nice guy’.

    Not that I disagree with him, but I don’t think his views should hold any more sway than anyone else

    richc
    Member

    I agree his views shouldn’t hold any more sway than any other head of voluntarily charitable organisation with over 3 million active members, which owns large chunks of the UKs infrastructure, national monuments and countryside.

    Lifer
    Member

    richc – Member

    “Seem to”. Good enough for me.

    Ah, the typical Atheist argument of ‘prove it’.

    I am not sure if its just me but it just seem to be used to stifle discussion/action to me, as when you have to prove and qualify everything nothing ever happens …. Seems to be the ideal religion for apathetic’s or lawyers to me

    😆

    Facts stifle debate? Brilliant.

    gonefishin
    Member

    Oxfam: Oxfam originated as a church affiliated food aid program in Melbourne.

    Not according to this

    http://www.oxfam.org.uk/oxfam_in_action/where_we_work/downloads/yemen_safahat1.pdf

    which state that it was fouding in the UK in 1942 and has no religious affiliations.

    Save the Children: Historians have since connected the overwhelming success of Save Our Children with the organization of conservative Christian participation in political processes

    Part of the Save the Children websiste states that they have no religious affiliation

    http://www.savethechildren.net/alliance/about_us/1919_supporters.html?keepThis=true&TB_iframe=true&height=500&width=700

    What historians have connected that charity to is irrelevant, they have no religious affiliation.

    I will give you the Red Cross,

    how very gracious of you.

    Ah, the typical Atheist argument of ‘prove it’.

    You say that like it’s a bad thing.

    I am not sure if its just me but it just seem to be used to stifle discussion/action to me, as when you have to prove and qualify everything nothing ever happens

    I think it’s just you, unless of course you think that all the advancements made in science all of which will have been suject to the statement ‘prove it’ didn’t happen.

    richc
    Member

    Demanding unquantifiable or available facts do, yes, as it falls back to two people shouting ‘prove it’ at each other.

    Life ain’t black and white, and if you have to absolutely define everything before you will start an intelligent conversation you ain’t going to be saying much.

    For example:

    Person 1: Good morning.
    Person 2: Prove it.

    j_me
    Member

    which state that it was fouding in the UK in 1942 and has no religious affiliations

    http://www.oxfam.org.uk/get_involved/work_with_us/trustees/history_of_oxfam.html

    yunki
    Member

    oh Rowan Williams…

    j_me
    Member


    oh Rowan Williams…

    Gary Streeter described Williams’ piece in the New Statesman as a “party political rant”.

    Does anyone remember if The Archbishop ranted at the last government in this way? (hint: oh yes he did) If so, what ‘party’ is he ranting for? Try as I might I can’t reconcile very many conventional C of E values with NuLab either, nor with much of what they did in government. 😕

    richc
    Member

    Oxfam link: http://www.oxfam.org.uk/get_involved/work_with_us/trustees/history_of_oxfam.html

    Extract: Members of the Society of Friends (the Quakers) were to play a significant part in Oxfam’s development.

    A lot of these Charities have to prove independence in order to be effective, hence breaking ties with any Belief / Country or Ideology.

    However to disregard the influence of Religion on why they were created in the first place seem naive especially considering the strong beliefs of the founding members, in an ideal world, leaders of oppressive regimes wouldn’t care who is helping them, and what they believe in. However we don’t so these organisations need to be independent, in order to help as many people as they can.

    My argument, against the doing nothing unless you prove it first applies to Science as well, for example we known how to use Quantum Mechanics to navigate submarines and create microchips however Science cannot ‘prove’ how it works, they just know it does.

    Premier Icon binners
    Subscriber

    I seem to recall that beardy had a thing or two to say about Iraq to Blair.

    At least he’s consistent, and it has to be said, bang on on both counts.

    Anyone who’s prepared to use his position to challenge either of those monumentally arrogant, power-crazed loons is alright by me

    gonefishin
    Member

    Life ain’t black and white, and if you have to absolutely define everything before you will start an intelligent conversation you ain’t going to be saying much.

    For example:

    Person 1: Good morning.
    Person 2: Prove it.

    That has to be the most laughably weak strawman argument I have ever come across. No really well done on that.

    richc
    Member
    j_me
    Member

    Prove it

    Science doesn’t prove anything.
    QED

    Premier Icon molgrips
    Subscriber

    Ah, the typical Atheist argument of ‘prove it’.
    You say that like it’s a bad thing.

    Bad? Arguable. It is hideously limited though.

    The ‘prove it’ brigade are like those people who always go out to the same restaurant and always order the same dish…

    Lifer
    Member

    molgrips – Member

    Ah, the typical Atheist argument of ‘prove it’.
    You say that like it’s a bad thing.

    Bad? Arguable. It is hideously limited though.

    The ‘prove it’ brigade are like those people who always go out to the same restaurant and always order the same dish…

    Could you expand on both points please?

    Oh….. 😳

    gonefishin
    Member

    It is hideously limited though.

    Is it? In what way do you find it limiting?

    It was quite effective in demonstrating that Oxfam didn’t originate in Melbourne.

    Extract: Members of the Society of Friends (the Quakers) were to play a significant part in Oxfam’s development.

    Oh and that’s cherry picking quotations too. If you read the whole of that part of the website you will find that some of the founding memebers seem to have clear religious affiliations but the same cannot be said about all of them. To use this as part of an argument to demonstrate that it has it’s foundations in religion is flawed.

    richc
    Member
    gonefishin
    Member

    Prove it

    Prove what exactly? Your inability to form or respond appropriately to reasoned arguments? You’re doing a prefectly good of that, you really don’t need any help from me.

    Premier Icon IdleJon
    Subscriber

    richc – Member
    No but they seem to fund a hell of a lot more aid charities than any Atheist organisations.

    Atheist organisations?

    Have a flick through the local paper and you’ll see plenty of people raising money for charity who aren’t doing it because of religious belief OR because they belong to these mystical atheist organisations.

    Perhaps when I raised money for TUSK last year, I should have nailed my colours to the mast and announced that I was doing it because of my membership of an atheist organisation?

    Is my workplace an atheist organisation? I’d guess that it is because it’s not a religious organisation. There’s plenty of money raised there.

    You know those 1000s of people who run the London Marathon every year – how many are doing it through a religious group and how many through ‘atheist organisations’?

    Do you need me to carry on to see how ridiculous your argument is?

    You don’t need to prove or disprove this – just open your eyes.

    By the way atheist has a small A for very obvious reasons.

    richc
    Member

    Prove what exactly? Your inability to form or respond appropriately to reasoned arguments? You’re doing a prefectly good of that, you really don’t need any help from me.

    Well at least you finally got my point about about how stupid the ‘Prove It’ response is, so in answer to your previous comment: ‘You say that like it’s a bad thing’ we seem to agree that answering ‘Prove it’ to anything/everything is a stupid response.

    Premier Icon molgrips
    Subscriber

    Could you expand on both points please?

    A philosophy based on evidence and proof is only one possible way of thinking.

    There are others.

    It’s like asking someone what the best film in the world is.

    yunki
    Member

    Oh.. Rowan Williams

    Junkyard
    Member

    Ah, the typical Atheist argument of ‘prove it’.

    makes more sense than having faith.
    FFS how can someone mock someone for having fact based opinions/views.
    I can give you evolution , geological record , astronomoy and othe rstuff to prove my view of the world you have that whsh is stated in Genesis. should I really give them equal weighting?

    Premier Icon molgrips
    Subscriber

    For the 100000th time belief in God is not the same thing as the belief in biblical inerrancy.

    makes more sense to me than having faith.

    FTFY.

    gonefishin
    Member

    ‘You say that like it’s a bad thing’ we seem to agree that answering ‘Prove it’ to anything/everything is a stupid response.

    Well you might as well have said responding with “belgium” (apologies to Douglas Adams) to anything someone says is a stupid response. You made a specific claim (in fact you have made several falsifiable (sp) statements on this thread without any proof) and in that situation it is perfectly resonable to reply with “prove it”. Instead of entering into an actual debate and backing up your claim, you insisted on putting up a series of strawman arguments in a rather weak attempt to support your position.

    Incidently it isn’t an athiest position to ask for claims to be proven, it’s more of a rationalist position. There are many irrational athiests just as there are rational thiests. Sadly on the basis of what you have posted here you certinaly don’t belong to the latter group.

    richc
    Member

    Nothing wrong with faith in my opinion, life without a belief in anything (and I don’t just mean god) would be a pretty miserable existence as there are only two facts that everyone agrees on. 1. you were born, and 2. you will die. Everything else is a bun fight.

    My argument/irritation with the ‘Prove it’ brigade, is unless you can prove it without a shadow of a doubt, then it doesn’t exist. Which is stupid as we know about lots of things that we cannot prove (yet).

    Finally; I thought that most Religions (bar the nutters, and both sides have plenty of loony’s) all agree with the Theory of evolution, geological record etc. The bit where it gets interesting is what started it all, as I said earlier, if we are random, where is everyone else? and that doesn’t even address the chicken and egg dilemma of DNA which came first the proteins or nucleic acids.

    scu98rkr
    Member

    Ask most Christians – churchgoing Christians – to name you the Ten Commandments, and they’d typically get about half. A survey I saw maybe a decade ago reckoned that only around 25% of Christian clergy could name them all.

    In all fairness the 10 commandments are judaism not Christianity. Christianity still thinks the Old testament is important but that the new testament has replaced it. This is the closest in the new testaments I reckon :

    “Thou shalt love the Lord thy God with all thy heart, and with all thy soul, and with all thy mind. This is the first and great commandment. And the second is like unto it. Thou shalt love thy neighbor as thyself. On these two commandments hang all the law and the prophets.” [Matt22:37-40]

    Jesus(ie Christianity) was nt all that big on commandments to be fair ie

    “The Sabbath was made for man, not man for the Sabbath” (Mark 2:27)

    Also in response to the first point I reckon most Jews probably could recite the ten commandments. Both Jews and Muslims are very keen on learning the law/bible/quran, Christianity from its birth was very much more about the spirit of the law rather than the letter of the law. So its probably a good thing that those Christains you mention earlier cant recite the 10 commandments.

    Premier Icon bikebouy
    Subscriber

    I rode through Parliment Sq t’other day, still have a few tents there with protesters in scattered around. No one was awake though, does that mean they don’t have an opinion or the right to be heard?
    Archy B simply placed a moral argument in front of some blunted instruments of our civic society that fail to understand what it actually is that the people want, and need, in this ere’ society of ours.

    Premier Icon molgrips
    Subscriber

    My argument/irritation with the ‘Prove it’ brigade, is unless you can prove it without a shadow of a doubt, then it doesn’t exist.

    What annoys me about them is that they seem to think that proof is the only thing that should be important.

    Also in response to the first point I reckon most Jews probably could recite the ten commandments. Both Jews and Muslims are very keen on learning the law/bible/quran, Christianity from its birth was very much more about the spirit of the law rather than the letter of the law. So its probably a good thing that those Christains you mention earlier cant recite the 10 commandments

    Whoah, steady on! You’re getting dangerously close to an open minded and intelligent assessment of the situation there!

    gonefishin
    Member

    My argument/irritation with the ‘Prove it’ brigade, is unless you can prove it without a shadow of a doubt, then it doesn’t exist. Which is stupid as we know about lots of things that we cannot prove (yet).

    I’ve never met anyone with that sort of attitude and you were the only one on this thread that presented this as a view point. All you appear to do whenever your statements are challenged is to change the topic and ignore legitamte criticism.

    The bit where it gets interesting is what started it all, as I said earlier, if we are random, where is everyone else?

    Why does something (or someone) have to have started it all? Just because something is improbable doesn’t make it impossible. If by everyone else you mean life on other planets then ffs give us a chance. We’ve only been going into space for 50 years and the universe is a pretty big place.

    and that doesn’t even address the chicken and egg dilemma of DNA which came first the proteins or nucleic acids.

    I have no idea. But just because I don’t know it doesn’t make it unknowable and doesn’t require the invention of a supernatural being. Besides even if you do invoke a supernatural being there remains the question how that being was created. The only two answers to that question that I’ve come across are “they always existed” (a cop out) or the equivalent of “turtles all the way down” which is nonsensical.

    Christianity from its birth was very much more about the spirit of the law rather than the letter of the law. So its probably a good thing that those Christains you mention earlier cant recite the 10 commandments

    Sounds more like post hoc rationalisation to me.

Viewing 40 posts - 41 through 80 (of 163 total)

The topic ‘Archbishop Rowan Williams’ is closed to new replies.