Anyone taken on a second nationality?

Home Forum Chat Forum Anyone taken on a second nationality?

Viewing 40 posts - 41 through 80 (of 91 total)
  • Anyone taken on a second nationality?
  • tarquin
    Member

    @tarquin – have you found any any downsides yet? I’m not really sure that there are any but it does seem like one of those things you won’t really find until you do it. It would be great to be able to vote again as I can’t vote in the UK any more and I can’t vote here either. Feels weird

    If Australia goes to war and decides to conscript then you have to go….

    You are required to vote and register by law.

    If you did decide to leave Australia and come back to the UK you can’t get your hands on your superannuation until you’re 65. (This is the same for permanent residents though).

    I don’t think there are any downsides.

    We moved back to the UK for the wife’s family, but I’m a proud Aussie, make sure it’s listed on all forms when it asks for nationality and I would move back tomorrow if I could.

    Had my Belgian nationality confirmed in September so less than 3 months after the EU Referendum vote. Been here 10 years now, didn’t want to risk not being eligible to continue living and working here. Lots of people’s responses (to my getting Belgian nationality) implied that they thought it was a bit OTT to get a 2nd nationality and that “of course Brits will still be able to live and work in the EU”… however nothing to lose if like me you’ve paid the requisite taxes for at least 5 years. Plus I was worried that – worse case scenario – there might be a point in time where perhaps technically as a Brit I’d no longer be able to be employed. Didn’t fancy taking the risk.

    No downsides, really, as long as I can keep British citizenship alongside Belgian citizenship it’s a win-win.

    mrmo
    Member

    my dads Irish and had never even considered getting a second passport until Brexit, after all what does an Irish passport offer that a UK one didn’t?

    24th June ordered all the paperwork and got it sorted.

    I don’t consider myself English and certainly not Irish.

    So what the f*** should i be?

    IMO nothing good ever comes of nationalism!

    And despite living and working in the UK since the 50’s my dad is now one of those EU citizens in limbo land!

    Premier Icon uphillcursing
    Subscriber

    I recently took Australian citizenship.

    I think I ought to be eligible for an Irish passport and also a
    Scottish one should anything ridiculous happen.

    The question then would be which side to go Reiveing should the old front open up again.

    copa
    Member

    Rather than adding a nationality, I would rather just revoke my British citizenship. I don’t want to be part of it.

    Premier Icon matt_outandabout
    Subscriber

    I could hold Indian citizenship. Im not sure I want to….

    chewkw
    Member

    Apart from those EU nations with large landmass the rest will cause claustrophobia … 😆

    You should choose from one with large landmass like … Spain, France, Germany, Poland, Norway, Sweden, Finland and …. perhaps Ukraine (they want you there).

    Ambrose
    Member

    I was born in Jamaica, of Jamaican roots. My brother recently claimed and obtained Jamaican (dual, with British) nationality due to the fact that his parents were both Jamaican nationals. He has done it for purely financial reasons. He’s in the oil industry and as a ‘local’ he will be better off if he gets a job in the Caribbean. I have not done so but could do if I chose to I suppose.

    Back in pre-EU membership days (remember them; you soon will) I knew a family who frequently visited France from deepest, darkest Essex. Dad was British, Mum was French. They had two children who thus qualified for dual nationality. The parents decided that it would be a good thing to ensure that the kids had dual-nationality and thus made certain that it was so. The main reason for this was to try to improve passage through customs/ passport control, they just headed for the shortest queue on their frequent cross channel trips.

    Not long after Tony’s 18th birthday he was called up by the French military for National Service.

    Premier Icon tuskaloosa
    Subscriber

    Leffe – no down sides to having dual nationality as yet but taxes can be a pain if you are not careful. We decided to close all our assets in Canada for the time being apart from our pensions.

    Also have a OCI (overseas citizen of India) card for India which allows me to invest and also work without a visa etc but it is of scant use from an economic pov for us.

    Premier Icon WildHunter2009
    Subscriber

    Dual UK Australian citizen, pretty handy as the fiancee is Australian. Only downsides are having to vote or get fined (i don’t mind voting but Australian politics is deeply deeply uninspiring).
    Fiancee is dual Australian US citizen. Some bigger tax implications and also very expensive to give up if you decide to. The US one can’t be passed down any further unless we live in the US as well. Also Trump

    BearBack
    Member

    What have you got to lose?

    you’ll gain a PITA if you have to do 2 tax returns.. especially if the tax years don’t align

    Premier Icon senor j
    Subscriber

    I have an Australian birth certificate , British passport.
    Thought about it , but never looked into it .As the parts of Oz I saw were less appealing than I’d prefer.Plus ,current problems I hear of,put me off more,even post bloody brexit!

    Marge
    Member

    Like a few of the folks on here, I’m a 10y+ Belgian resident hence I do intend to grab a second nationality.

    Its on my list of things to do this year, as is get dual British for my kids (who are only Belgian at this moment)

    I just don’t look forward to the admin….

    konagirl
    Member

    There was a process to vote from overseas.

    British citizens can vote from overseas for up to 15 years after leaving, so unfortunately Roter Stern can’t vote any more.

    As said, there can be tax implications depending on the dual nationality. And yes, the US is a royal pain, very very expensive to revoke. I know a few families split Spanish and British parents and Spain don’t formally allow dual nationality over 18, so they’re pretty buggered by Brexit. I also know some Northern Irish who have taken an Irish passport. I work in academia so people expect to move for work. It’s the uncertainty that is most worrying and I know many people are thinking of getting out of the UK now while there are job options just in case the ‘negotiations’ don’t protect them and then they (and their families) are stuffed.

    I have an Australian birth certificate , British passport.
    Thought about it , but never looked into it .As the parts of Oz I saw were less appealing than I’d prefer.Plus ,current problems I hear of,put me off more,even post bloody brexit!

    You’ve gone to the wrong bits 😉 Everywhere has good and bad points…

    aphex_2k
    Member

    Whinging Pom

    Premier Icon senor j
    Subscriber

    Starting to look into Swedish citizenship due to Brexit, wasn’t before as I didn’t see a need.

    But seems like a good backup plan now. Everybody needs a backup plan 🙂

    @HowsyourDad and Bream, how long did it take?

    Premier Icon Leku
    Subscriber

    I was hoping to get an Irish passport but it looks like it may not now be an option.

    Maybe Scotland will have a similar rule to Ireland (ie anyone born north or south of border can have a passport). Scotland rejoins EU and for a modest fee we have all have dual nationality.

    thecaptain
    Member

    I’ve got permanent residency in Japan, not really planning on using it though except for the odd visit. Requires a bit of maintenance so I’ll probably lose it in a few more years. Can’t see myself moving back long-term even if brexshit goes tits up.

    Premier Icon howsyourdad1
    Subscriber

    hi Swedish chef, it took around 5 weeks I think. depends on your circumstances of course but I think you are similar to me? Swedish wife/sambo, children born in Sweden? full time job and proficiency with language. not that the kids and job matter. don’t quote me on that!

    Yup that sums it up nicely. Thanks.

    When did you apply?

    Premier Icon NewRetroTom
    Subscriber

    US one seems the worst – no matter where you live you are still liable to US taxes.
    Boris Johnson got hit with a big tax bill when he sold his London home as there is no relief for capital gains on selling your home in the USA. He talked about renouncing his US citizenship but don’t think he actually did.

    thecaptain
    Member

    “no relief” is actually $250,000 of relief, double that for a couple. That’s probably not enough for MPs flipping houses in London though.

    He has repeatedly promised to renounce his citizenship, but we all know how little his word is worth.

    Premier Icon lucky7500
    Subscriber

    Starting to look into Swedish citizenship due to Brexit, wasn’t before as I didn’t see a need.

    This is probably worth looking in to, particularly if you have children.

    MrSalmon
    Member

    I’m quite likely to apply for an Irish passport soon. My Dad was born in Dublin so I think I’m a shoo in, although TBH I haven’t really looked into the process yet.

    Yeah saw that, thanks.

    Having many Swedish friends who have done military service I have no issues with that. Also the headline is somewhat click bait like.

    jimoiseau
    Member

    Just to clear up some of the inaccuracies around Irish citizenship mentioned earlier. From the Irish Department of Foreign Affairs:

    My Grandad was born in Ireland but neither of my parents have Irish Passports. Am I entitled to apply for Irish citizenship?
    Yes. An application for Irish citizenship through Foreign Births Registration can be submitted by any person with a grandparent born on the island of Ireland even if your parents do not hold Irish passports.

    Premier Icon finishthat
    Subscriber

    Dual UK/French by birth – as posted above the only downsides :
    1/Consular support – if in one of your nationalities you are that one no ifs.
    2/ Got my call up papers for national service – deferred as i was in full time education – otherwise I would have had to do it – now this was in the early 80`s no call ups for a long time now.
    It all really depends if one of the nationalities does not allow it you have no options anyway.
    For tax and residency purposes I thing the 6 months +1 day rule applies .

    Edit – Grandfather born in Ireland – so technically I may have option of a 3rd.

    mrmo
    Member

    Mrsalmon, you will need a copy of your Irish parents birth certificate, a certified copy from Irish records is ok, your own, proof of residence, bills etc. A few signed photos and the right amount of money.

    Premier Icon ourmaninthenorth
    Subscriber

    I had to explain to my “generations English” father-in-law the other day that he couldn’t just acquire an Irish passport to avoid post-Brexit isolation…!

    My grandfather was Swiss. A quick looks tells me I have no chance of that, and it’s not especially helpful in the context of the EU.

    Premier Icon howsyourdad1
    Subscriber

    @Swedishchef I applied in November last year.

    mogrim
    Member

    I know a few families split Spanish and British parents and Spain don’t formally allow dual nationality over 18, so they’re pretty buggered by Brexit.

    It’s more the paperwork that’s putting me off! (There’s also a language and general knowledge test, but I’m not worried about either of those. Although I’m sure both cost money…)

    MrSalmon
    Member

    A few signed photos and the right amount of money

    Now I imagine someone at the Irish embassy deciding on what the right amount of money is, depending on whether they like the look of you or not.

    nicko74
    Member

    Just submitted my forms for Irish (through a grandparent); and since I’m in Canada I should be eligible for Canadian citizenship in the next few years.

    mrmo
    Member

    Now I imagine someone at the Irish embassy deciding on what the right amount of money is, depending on whether they like the look of you or not.

    You jest

    http://www.thejournal.ie/immigrant-investor-programme-2023070-Apr2015/

    Seriously, i think the price is about 80 euros for the passport. and a further c40 if you want a plastic card passport.

    Premier Icon Wookster
    Subscriber

    Funnily enough, having an Irish passport and nationality, I’ve wondered about going the other way as my Wife and Kids are all UK passport holders, in case it all goes really right wing!

    lardcore
    Member

    Going the other way and considering a UK citizenship. £1236 at the moment (that’s after filling out the 85 page form for a piece of paper ‘proving’ something I already had i.e. right of permanent residence). This is before Cruela de Vil decides that it is ‘people’s mandate’ to charge the dirty foreigners twice that for the privilege of continuing to live and work in UK. Bitter? Moi?

    Bream
    Member

    Still waiting for the process Swedish Chef; will be 8 weeks and counting on Wednesday!

    This thread inspired me to kick off the process, so we’ll see what happens and how long it will take.

    Online form sent in and paid for. Very easy.
    Passport sent off registered post. No business trips for a bit then.

    Bream
    Member

    There’s a very easy passport recal service on their website, says you need to give them 10 days notice, just called mine back and arrived just within the 10 days. Also got a letter saying they don’t need it back so that part of it is done now.

Viewing 40 posts - 41 through 80 (of 91 total)

You must be logged in to reply to this topic.