Viewing 29 posts - 1 through 29 (of 29 total)
  • Anyone dabbled with (or even persevered with) making their own bags?
  • Premier Icon Bez
    Full Member

    I confess, I’ve got a problem. I don’t know how many handlebar bags I’ve got. Some are close to perfect but just not quite, so I wondered how hard it is to make your own.

    There’s an old sewing machine in the cupboard under the stairs, but I’ve never used one. I have shaky hands and tired eyes and fiddly things tend to frustrate me, but if I can find the time I’m up for giving it a go.

    Any sage words of advice, though? It it a fool’s errand from the outset? How many evenings will I consume before I even get a good stitch? And so on… Your experiences please. 🙂

    Premier Icon rossburton
    Full Member

    My 2c: making a sewing machine go in a straight line isn’t hard, an evening of experimenting on a piece of scrap will be all you need. I made a tool roll out of an old tee in a single evening, including an hour of learning how to thread a machine.

    Making a sewing machine go where you want it on the fiddly important bits through tough fabric? Much harder. Maybe commission Weecog?

    Premier Icon scotroutes
    Full Member

    There’s a great MYOG thread on the Bearbones Bikepacking forum.

    Premier Icon TheBrick
    Free Member

    I am going to embark on this soon as well. Two points I have learnt from my very limited experience.

    #1 Consider getting someone who know about sowing machines to test it. Mine was not running well (I had no idea) and a service / tune up made it much easier to use.

    #2. Practice on some easy material like old bedsheets before progressing to slippery manmade / thick fabrics.

    Premier Icon Esme
    Full Member

    Might you be able to adjust some of your existing bags, to improve them?
    Are any a good size and shape, but maybe the fastenings aren’t quite right?

    I’ve been making outdoor stuff for decades, but bags are still a fiddly challenge.

    Premier Icon supersessions9-2
    Full Member

    I made three framebags last year. Really enjoyed it. They’re not perfect but they are working well and wearing well.

    https://www.instagram.com/p/B_gGvaPnEz6/?igshid=gcikmabw2wh3

    https://www.instagram.com/p/B-BHGwDH9D8/?igshid=t4adn78j7paf

    https://www.instagram.com/p/B-A0kConps-/?igshid=1xiv6x7w99o18

    Premier Icon whitestone
    Free Member

    There’s quite a few MYOG articles on bikepacking.com, things like frame bags, stem cells.

    Premier Icon DrP
    Full Member

    Years ago when I could be bothered to blog about things, I blogged about making frame bags…

    Might be a fun read!!

    DrP

    Premier Icon Bez
    Full Member

    Cheers, only flicked through the pictures while I’m on a call, but looks useful.

    Keep ‘em coming 🙂

    Physically adjusting existing bags? No, don’t think that will work; one would benefit from a daisy chain that I could use to help stabilise it. But taking an existing design and tweaking it to suit? That’s basically what I had in mind.

    Probably won’t happen anyway if I’m brutally honest 😂

    Premier Icon sillyoldman
    Full Member

    You following DrJon’s efforts?

    Also another pal – https://www.instagram.com/couby_wan_stitchworks/?hl=en

    Premier Icon Bez
    Full Member

    Yup, got the good Doctor covered 🙂

    Premier Icon ampthill
    Full Member

    Frame bag that I made

    A frame bag that I have just finished. Hard to make perfect. Ok to get something functional

    Premier Icon supernova
    Full Member

    Frame bag

    I can make these in about 4 hours now after a week or two’s practise starting from never having used a sewing machine before.

    The sewing’s almost the smallest part compared to the planning and cutting.

    Premier Icon tall_martin
    Full Member

    I was given a sewing machine by a mate. My wife has one.

    I have fixed loads of stuff but only made a few bags.

    Fixing clothing, fine. Stitching two thick layers of fabric to some webbing much harder.

    I fixed a pod sac the other week.
    It took me a couple of hours to put a new zip on. I thought it would take me 10min.

    Premier Icon Esme
    Full Member

    Ampthill, Supernova – where did you buy the fabric, please?

    Premier Icon ampthill
    Full Member

    Point north

    Highly recommended

    I think mine took 10 hours. Including staring into space thinking about zips and makin a small roll top bag as practice and lots of other tests

    I bought double sided 6mm tape. Really great to stick thinks together prior to stitching. Another tip I read was aim to support the zip with your attachment points. This seems to have worked well. The zip is easy to use o.e handed

    Premier Icon supernova
    Full Member

    Point North profabrics.co.uk is a great place to start.

    Double sided tape is a top tip.

    Good pair of scissors makes life much easier.

    Premier Icon TheBrick
    Free Member

    What material are you using. I saved a bit of truck tarp but think it maybe too heavy to sow.

    Premier Icon eskay
    Full Member

    Some of the zips look waterproof/resistant, where are you buying them from?

    Premier Icon ampthill
    Full Member

    Point North Do water resistant zips but they are pricey

    Supernova and I have Xpac visible on the sides. I think he has a heavier fabric near the frame for better wear resistance. Time will tell as to whether I should have done that

    I think my design means that at some point you are sewing through at least 4 layers of cloth. Although though the tough think to sew was were the heard plastic loops for the straps. But no don’t go to thick

    Premier Icon mjsmke
    Free Member

    Made a couple of small bags out of old inner tubes. The last one is to fit in a jersey pocket to hold a multitool, tire levers, chain links, cable ties etc. All hand stitched and found a nylon thread easier to use than cotton on inner tubes.

    Premier Icon jonm81
    Full Member

    I made this one last week

    Fabric

    Zip

    Webbing

    Binding

    Thread

    Needles

    Premier Icon supernova
    Full Member

    I like the colour matching!

    Premier Icon supernova
    Full Member

    As noted above, I use VX21 on the sides and waterproof 1000d Cordura around the edges with a webbing ladder all the way round.

    The cordura is much more forgiving than the vx21, though the vx21 is thinner and does hold a crease better. The cordura will allow the odd mis-placed needle stab, the vx21 will retain a hole.

    Premier Icon belugabob
    Free Member

    IMG_20171005_175454134

    Framebag Mk2

    Framebag Mk1

    In reverse order of creation.
    Made totally if VX21.
    No waterproof seams, as water will always find a way in, and those few things that are water sensitive are stored in ziplock bags, anyway.

    Premier Icon nowad
    Free Member

    Make all my own. Very easy the larger the task. Small bags and anything with a circle I suggest to leave till more confident.
    As others have said, point north for everything.
    Start with 1000 cordura for durability.
    300 cordura for lighter small bags without much potential to rub.
    XPac but its twice the price.
    Ripstop for tops of feed bags etc.
    You don’t need waterproof zips unless waterproofing or sealing the stitching. Make a storm flap if ness.
    Hugely rewarding and incredibly cheap. Full size frame bag for about a tenner in cordura. Tons of ideas and really helpful people on instagram under #myog or #myobg

    Premier Icon thenorthwind
    Full Member

    https://www.instagram.com/p/CD6Zdjtlg33/

    I’ve made a few things before, but no sewing expert. The stitching doesn’t have to be terribly neat since you won’t see it.

    Think it all through carefully before you start, work out what order you need to do things in.

    Use strong thread and go heavy on the stitching to make sure if you haven’t got the skill to finesse it to start with.

    Premier Icon asbrooks
    Full Member

    There are some accessories available to help with the slippery materials that are cheap enough

    Teflon Foot

    Walking Foot

    Seam Guide

    Additionally if you want to waterproof the bag, get some clear silicon sealant and let it down with turps to a consistency that can be painted over the seams. Silicone sealant I’ve used this to seal the seams of an old jacket. It’s expensive, I get it from work.

    Premier Icon theflash
    Free Member

    My friend from the Bike shop I used to work out has done exactly this!

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