Any positives to not hydrating during a hot sweaty ride?

Viewing 39 posts - 1 through 39 (of 39 total)
  • Any positives to not hydrating during a hot sweaty ride?
  • Premier Icon sirromj
    Subscriber

    My commutes aren’t far enough to require a drink during, but I Iike to extend them on the way home once or twice a week. Just wondered if there’s any positives to regularly not hydrating during an 1hr to 1.5hr ride, of varying intensities (ie today’s was equally split between HR Z2, Z3, Z4). Or is it just not a good idea. Just curious, not training for anything.

    mikewsmith
    Member

    Do you want to weigh less at the end?

    Premier Icon andytheadequate
    Subscriber

    There’s an awful lot of downsides of being dehydrated, so I can’t imagine it’s a good idea, especially in the summer.

    Premier Icon sirromj
    Subscriber

    No loosing weight isn’t a goal, maybe a sliver of belly fat but other than that no.

    Premier Icon jeffl
    Subscriber

    Depends how hot it is. I can happily ride two hours without water or food in normal temperatures. The only issue I have, if I’m going for it and sweating a lots is cramps at 2 in the morning. I find an electrolyte drink when I get home normally sorts that out.

    <span style=”font-size: 0.8rem;”>Recently however I’ve been taking a drink with me for anything over an hour and a half.</span>

    Oh and positives, your bike will weigh 500g less if you forgo the water bottle.

    Premier Icon ta11pau1
    Subscriber

    Because dehydration is awesome.

    Oh, wait.. it’s not is it?

    With the amount I sweat (dripping off me after a 10 minute commute in this weather) I’d probably go through a litre an hour of water.

    atlaz
    Member

    I dunno, perhaps heat stroke is a positive for you? For an hour in hot weather, I’d take a bottle anyway but if not I’d drink a fair bit before leaving and a load on arrival. TBH, there are no positives and lots of possible negatives.

    I rode for 2 hours yesterday in 35 degree head at a bit below tempo and it took me a few hours to get the dehydration under control again. That was with one 750ml bottle but admittedly I’d been in the sun a fair bit before. I understand your question but I don’t see any positives but lots of potential negatives.

    I’m not aiming to KoM Alpe d’Huez so a bottle or two on the bike is no drama really. If you’re commuting I assume the same applies.

    You’d be marginally more likely to get a ride in an ambulance, which sounds quite exciting.

    Premier Icon sirromj
    Subscriber

    So no adaption by the body leading to an improvement in one’s water conservation properties? Or anything similar?

    Premier Icon zilog6128
    Subscriber

    Actually googling it I found at least 1 article (aimed at runners) claiming a similar sort of benefit to training at altitude.

    Years ago a mate trained for some adventure riding and endurance racing (in the US IIRC) by riding for hours on little or no water.  I can’t remember his rationale but it made sense at the time.

    Needless to say, he hardly enjoyed the experience.  But he said later that he felt it strengthened his mindset when he was suffering with various conditions.

    Not something I would do though, especially as I’ve suffered heatstroke and dehydration and have no wish to do so again.

    shermer75
    Member

    Lower blood pressure ftw

    MTB Rob
    Member

    Not having to go for a pee every 20 mins?

    As above really, why? with the weather we having at the moment I would say it is a stupid idea, it’s hard enough to stay hydrated through out a normal day at the mo with out adding to it.

    steezysix
    Member

    Used to work with a guy that was training to be a UIAGM mountain guide – he would often do training sessions without sufficient water/food/sleep. He said it was mainly useful in learning how he coped with each deprivation and helped him recognise when he needed to slow down or stop before it got too serious. I guess if you are training for an endurance event it could be useful to experiment but otherwise can’t see the benefit day to day commuting.

    Premier Icon kelron
    Subscriber

    What a strange question. I can’t even go for a walk without taking water at the moment.

    So no adaption by the body leading to an improvement in one’s water conservation properties? Or anything similar?

    I remember there was a fad for this sometime in the 90’s. From what i can remember it was based more on a hunch that the body would work this way than any hard science and lost traction after a year or two. Not really heard of anyone doing it recently.

    Premier Icon sirromj
    Subscriber

    It was just something I thought was an interesting question which arose due to regularly riding without drinking while on the bike because I never or rarely take fluid with me on the commute because the distance is short and I’m not very organised about the longer extensions on the way back. Weekend rides I’ll always take a drink with me. Thanks for the answers though😎

    hols2
    Member

    So no adaption by the body leading to an improvement in one’s water conservation properties? Or anything similar?

    If you are a camel, maybe. For a human, no. If you are hot, you have to sweat to avoid death from overheating. If you sweat and don’t drink, you will dehydrate. When you feel thirsty, you should drink water.

    FunkyDunc
    Member

    Drink the water you need to stay hydrated.

    Overtime as you get fitter and more used to the heat your body will adapt and be slightly more efficient in the heat, but you are still very very daft to ever purposely hold back on hydration.

    Premier Icon BigJohn
    Subscriber

    The main benefit is that it makes the post-ride drink taste better.  An iced coffee (double espresso, ice cream, mik, double cream, loads of sugar) is my choice in this weather.

    Premier Icon sirromj
    Subscriber

    As if to prove you all right, I had quite a strong cramp in my left calf this morning, just as I was about to climb out of bed. Half stood up felt a bit light headed, went to go get 18month from his room, felt like I was going to pass out, saw violet blotches, had to sit down for 5 minutes, all over body sweat, called OH to get me a drink of water. Then went to bathroom, piss a rather rich brown colour, felt light headed again. Ok now.

    ndthornton
    Member

    I used to not bother with drink on a 1h40 commute.

    I just drank as much water as I could physically consume during the 10 minutes before setting off – and then was completely fine.

    I found I could carry almost the contents of a hydration pack in my stomach!

    mikewsmith
    Member

     Then went to bathroom, piss a rather rich brown colour, felt light headed again. Ok now.

    What are you pissing the right colour or have the immediate symptoms gone away. sounds like you are very dehydrated.

    Premier Icon theotherjonv
    Subscriber

    You’d be marginally more likely to get a ride in an ambulance, which sounds quite exciting.

    LOL

    Premier Icon nedrapier
    Subscriber

    Can’t think of any benefits, other than the self knowledge side-benefits and tongue in cheek ones above.  If I didn’t have a water bottle, I wouldn’t worry too much about riding without one for an hour or an hour and a half. I don’t usually take one for our evening rides of that length.  I’d guzzle a pint, or more if I could, before I left.  Bit of sensible precautions too: If I was on for a hard extension to the after work commute, I’d probably not go for a boozy lunch then spend the afternoon only drinking coffee.

    If you’re doing it regularly, just take a bottle with you.  No downside (extra weight is extra training!), and you might get caught out if you never take one:  manic afternoon working or meetings, and then leave in a hurry, you might be dehydrated before you start

    Premier Icon Drac
    Subscriber

    You’ll not piss yourself

    Premier Icon dissonance
    Subscriber

    As per others doesnt come across as the best idea.

    Think the only advantage is not having to carry water. I do hour rides without carrying water but then I would adjust the intensity to suit, eg in this weather would keep it fairly low key, and make sure I am properly hydrated before hand.

    In long-distance running (can’t imagine cycling is much different) it’s considered safer to underhydrate than overhydrate. More people die of overhydration in events than underhydration.

    FWIW at one time or another I’ve done both.The overhydration was worse – only time I’ve ever had to pull out of a race.

    In terms of performance, the best thing* is to take on water that has the correct concentration of electrolytes. Then you’re just correctly hydrated, which is a good place to be.

    Whether there’s a training benefit is not something I’ve ever considered. there’s probably something to be said for experiencing both, to know what they feel like to help avoid it in future.

    *My opinion, based on personal experience. I’m not claiming this is gospel.

    Premier Icon DezB
    Subscriber

    I remember the wee feeling very tingly after a XC race where I ran out of water. That could be a benefit, I suppose. Tingly. And brown.

    peaslaker
    Member

    Dehydration and heat stroke are two different conditions.  A little sweat goes a long way in a breeze.  If you are wearing excessive clothing or a backpack that reduces airflow over your back, you could have impaired cooling which would be worth thinking about but it isn’t the dehydration that is taking its toll – it is the accumulation of core temperature.

    Being transiently dehydrated is tolerable but is often conflated with heat related distress; the two are (largely) independent states.  Controlling heat is to do with convection and ambient humidity.  Outdoor motive exercise (running/cycling) seldom results in heat stroke unless there are mitigating circumstances but when you stop exercising (stop the breeze) you should ensure your temperature can be maintained.

    It is ok to be transiently dehydrated.  Just don’t defeat your mechanisms of temperature control by wearing excessive clothing for the conditions or otherwise compromising your cooling.  Be more aware of the risks in very humid conditions.  Extended hill climbing at slow speeds also represents a large workload with reduced airflow.

    After exercise, there is no reason to expect your body to be the same weight it was before exercise.  You also should not just immediately reinsert water (electrolytes or not) to the same amount as the missing weight.  Give your poor body a few hours of steady inputs rather than flush it with a big hit.

    peaslaker
    Member

    Re. positives.  The distinction is again between acclimation to dehydration and acclimation to temperature.  In response to repeated exposure to exercise in elevated temperatures (both dry and humid) there is evidence of acclimation: increased plasma volume, reduced heart rate, increased sweating.

    Dehydration isn’t the driving mechanism – we are broadly tolerant of varying hydration levels; temperature control is the driving mechanism – bad things happen if the body cannot maintain temperature in a narrow band.

    Premier Icon Garry_Lager
    Subscriber

    There are no positives to not hydrating, but you can overdo it. That’s something that can happen over very long efforts like what kenneth is talking about above, triathlon ironmans and things like that – so not 90 minutes. Hyponatremia – very low sodium levels in the blood brought on by excessive water intake.

    There does seem to have been pushback on excessive hydration in recent years, like the bobbins camelbak and their ilk would push on how much you need to drink. In more normal English weather when it’s a bit cold it feels easy to a couple of hours on not much water and not feel thirsty.

    Premier Icon nedrapier
    Subscriber

    I remember the wee feeling very tingly after a XC race where I ran out of water.

    tingly or lumpy?

    <div class=”bbp-reply-author”>ndthornton</div>

    <div class=”bbp-reply-content”>

    I found I could carry almost the contents of a hydration pack in my stomach!

    </div>

    Mee too, although I started using CO2 cartridges instead of a pump

    Premier Icon dudeofdoom
    Subscriber

    There does seem to have been pushback on excessive hydration in recent years, like the bobbins camelbak and their ilk would push on how much you need to drink. In more normal English weather when it’s a bit cold it feels easy to a couple of hours on not much water and not feel thirsty.

    remember reading about this and pretty much they reckon everyone’s overhydrating as everyone that bangs on about it is usually trying to flog some magic powder or a camelback.

    You really don’t want be experimenting in this weather thou, wasn’t that long ago that three people died in the sas selection tests over in the brecons. 🙁

    Premier Icon rone
    Subscriber

    Just rode more or less off-road to the Peak 35 miles with no water.

    I’m not claiming to be a martyr but I don’t need it for such a short ride. I do drink before and afterwards, and yes I think you adapt.

    My stomach bloats on anything so I have over time limited food and water to a degree.

    I wouldn’t say my performance actually benefits at all but it is doable.

    Premier Icon BadlyWiredDog
    Subscriber

    I read this a while back and thought it was quite a good starting point:

    https://www.outsideonline.com/2148776/new-rules-hydration

    One of the things I’m conscious of is that I seem to be quite a salty sweater – lots of salt deposits on clothes, helmet straps, very salty deposits left on skin etc. Not sure if this is an issue and what, if anything, I should do about it.

    Premier Icon Dickyboy
    Subscriber

    Regularly go for an 1.5hr run even in these temps in the evening without water, don’t particularly load before or after, I do sweat like a b’stard but have never experienced darkening wee colour. Most advice on hydration amounts are over hyped IMO.

    steezysix
    Member

    One of the things I’m conscious of is that I seem to be quite a salty sweater – lots of salt deposits on clothes, helmet straps, very salty deposits left on skin etc. Not sure if this is an issue and what, if anything, I should do about it.

    Make sure you never, ever wear an On-One helmet.

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