Any good links to kitchen plumbing "how to" sites?

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  • Any good links to kitchen plumbing "how to" sites?
  • qwerty
    Member

    I’m a noobie I have this

    and need to attatch a dishwasher and a 1.5 kitchen sink.

    Ta

    Premier Icon nickjb
    Subscriber

    That should be pretty easy. Washing machine trap will take care of drains for sink and dishwasher (eg) Then some isolating ball valves on the hot and cold, a Tee, a washing machine valve (eg) and some flexis to the taps

    DIYnot is a good website for advice. There is a forum which has a mix or pros and diyers. Advice is a bit mixed but usually helpful. There is also a wiki with some how-to guides.

    Premier Icon footflaps
    Subscriber

    Homebase / B&Q normally have some good guides. I have a Homebase Electrics book, which pretty much shows you how to do everything.

    Premier Icon wwaswas
    Subscriber

    as per footflaps -Wickes etc all do guides or you can get a book from Smiths.

    nealglover
    Member

    You will want a set up like this for your 1.5 bowl sink.

    The left hand side attached to the .5 and the centre to the main bowl.
    The small stub sticking up is for the dishwasher outlet.
    The right hand side connected to the outgoing waste pipe.

    llama
    Member

    I can just about connect up things with copper compression fittings. Same as connecting up brakes really. Do everything loosely first, tighten fully after, careful not to undo/twist/bend the other end of the pipe you are tightening, and use that tapey stuff on the threads. You can tell I’m an expert. Fittings and pipe are expensive though. If you pay a pro they’ll have it done in no time, much better quality, and it will probably not be much more money.

    Premier Icon wwaswas
    Subscriber

    use that tapey stuff on the threads

    put it on the olives.

    I tend to use push fit connections now, tbh. Cost more but for the rank amateur there seems to be a higher rate of success…

    Premier Icon footflaps
    Subscriber

    I tend to use push fit connections now, tbh. Cost more but for the rank amateur there seems to be a higher rate of success…

    I just don’t trust them in the long term, I solder everything (bar plastic waste fittings).

    McHamish
    Member

    I tend to use push fit connections now, tbh. Cost more but for the rank amateur there seems to be a higher rate of success…

    I used push fit connectors when i fitter my kitchen…ended up having to cover every joint with a lot of mastic to get rid of the drips. I wish i’d soldered the joints properly now.

    Vern0n
    Member

    Assuming no cold feed for the dishwasher you will need to T off one from the cold supply first – i think most just need a cold feed these days.

    Then line up the hot & cold to approximately where you need them for the sink. Worth planning this carefully to avoid tight turns / drilling around cabinets / under the basin etc.

    Simplest is to then get some push-fit mixer tails if its a mixer tap, like these : http://www.wickes.co.uk/flexi-hose-pair-monobloc-mixer-spdfit/invt/227312/. Or a compression join equivalent. Just get the right size for your tap (important bit). Make sure tap is suitable for your water system (ie high / low pressure).

    Like footflaps my preference would be to solder / compression join all the pipes in copper. I have always used gunk (jointing compound) rather than tape for the compression joints (ie on the ‘olives’) – never failed me yet. Just dont go too tight with compression joints at first, nip them up gradually if any sign of weeping water.

    Then get a all-in-one waste kit (see pic above) and run the dishwasher outlet to the small Tee on the waste trap.

    Again +1 for Wickes / or even Homebase have some good guides on their website / in-store.

    Put kettle on. Enjoy with biscuits.

    Vern0n
    Member

    Thanks to homebase for pic πŸ™‚

    nealglover
    Member

    I used push fit connectors when i fitter my kitchen…ended up having to cover every joint with a lot of mastic to get rid of the drips.

    😯

    You used Mastic to seal leaks on Push Fit ?! 😯

    (I would suggest removing it all and doing it again properly)

    toby1
    Member

    I have a leaky stop-cock to replace this weekend 50/50 chance it’ll result in flushing the toilet with a bucket until a plumber can come in and sort me out!

    πŸ˜‰

    Rockhopper
    Member

    I used genuine SpeedFit connectors and also B&Q and Wicks own brand along with a mix of copper and plastic pipe on most of my house and not had a single problem.

    Top tip though – don’t ever stick your finger into a SpeedFit connector!!

    Premier Icon wwaswas
    Subscriber

    don’t ever stick your finger into a SpeedFit connector!!

    they hold on tight don’t they πŸ™‚

    I’ve got the removal tool now…

    McHamish
    Member

    You used Mastic to seal leaks on Push Fit ?!

    (I would suggest removing it all and doing it again properly)

    Doesn’t leak anymore. πŸ˜‰

    turin
    Member

    As mentioned by somebody else above, if it was me I would be fitting isolating valves before anything else, means if you ever have to do some work in there then you can at least switch off the water to the area. a few extra quid right now but serious reduction in potential PITA later!

    Bear
    Member

    crimp is where it’s at, either on plastic, steel or copper!

    Not sure you’d want to spend the few thousands on tooling up for it though!

    nealglover
    Member

    [Quote]You used Mastic to seal leaks on Push Fit ?!
    (I would suggest removing it all and doing it again properly)[/quote]
    [Quote]Doesn’t leak anymore. [/quote]

    It’s only a matter of time. 😐

    If you didnt use copper pipe, Did you remember to use pipe inserts in every pipe end ? That’s the usual cause of leaks when “DIY” push fit installations leak

    Either that, or copper pipe cut with a hacksaw damaging the fitting when pushed in.

    I’ve fixed a fair few, and every time it was one of those two problems causing the leaks.

    So sorry but as a Plumber, I find it fascinating that people think they can do these things by copying a picture from a DIY store…. It’s brave to say the least. I hope it works out for you though. But why not just pay a qualified person to do it? And did I read silicone on push fit fittings? My gosh! And the picture from Homebase has the hot feed under the cold feed which will warm your drinking water beautifully for you. DIY in the right places is great but in my opinion, it isn’t here.

    I’m off now to remove my own wisdom teeth and then I’m tattooing a sleeve on my own arm.

    Vern0n
    Member

    But why not just pay a qualified person to do it?

    1) learn something useful
    2) it’s not really that brave
    3) qualified person does not = guarantee of a good job

    Oh and cost πŸ™„

    Tell me it’s not brave when one of the push fit fittings (without an insert, cut with a hacksaw) flies off. Or the dishwasher waste connection (without a jubilee clip) loosens and empties onto the floor. A proper plumber would complete this job in half a day max providing the Carpenter had the base unit in and the work top cut out for the sink.

    I’m all for people having a go. But I don’t get why people train for years to become tradesmen if it’s all so easy?

    andyl
    Member

    not read all the replies but did spot mention of mastic on push fit!

    Stick with decent push fit, they look like JG Speedfit (also available in grey).

    It is so cheap from Toolstation and screwfix you have no reason to go for a cheaper brand.

    Also stick with the solvent weld waste as much as you can – MUCH better than the screw type stuff with rubber seals etc. Don’t bother with telescopic waste etc – just cut the solvent weld to fit exactly. Get it all cut and set up and held with a bit of masking tape if needed and then solvent weld it all together – by far the best way to do your waste but make sure you follow the guides on how to do it.

    I’ve done a few kitches and bathrooms over the years and I would rate solvent weld the best, then push fit and then the compression type.

    Back to the water in side and I have never soldered so just use push fit (JG Speedfit is the one I use) and normal compression fittings when I need to and if you do other work with lots of compression joints get a proper plumbers adjustable spanner.

    For the inlet you want a T on each and then service valves before each outlet. You can buy braided push fit flexible tap connecting hoses with service valves in (eg Toolstation). I normally fit the full bore service valves if I want to maintain high flow but they are compression fit (metal with olives) only. You can put compression onto plastic pipe and copper into push fit so no problem mixing them up.

    For the waste get a plumbed in waste and not one of the open topped vertical waste traps and make sure you have a U bend/bottle trap to stop smells etc.

    i would also suggest buying a decent poly pipe cutter (the blue one from screwfix is the same as the branded one for 2x the price) and don’t bother with an adjustable metal pipe cutter – just get a 15mm metal one that just clips round the pipe and cuts in about 3 rotations.

    spooky_b329
    Member

    People train for years to become tradesmen to cater for those that would rather pay than get stuck in.

    Anyone with some common sense can do some basic plumbing. I managed it, I even had enough sense to spend a few quid on a pipe slicer and some inserts.

    For those that doubt the secureness of push fit, I used miniature JG pushfit connectors at work and they withstand 200 PSI of air with no problems and no leakage, and this can be after they were installed years earlier and left in a damp heat-shrink closure in a muddy hole. (there are older crappy versions that leak like a sieve, but they are a different design)

    Bear
    Member

    Don’t be put off. Have a go, ask your plumber for some advice / be on stand by. Give him a drink for it.

    And don’t use a bottle trap as they are more prone to blocking up.

    So a pipe slice, a pair of plastic cutters, some JG fittings, some JG speed fit inserts and pipe. Some solvent weld pipe 1.5″, some solvent weld bends, tub of solvent weld glue, some jointing compound, maybe a mono tap spanner set, some silicone for sealing the sink hole in the worktop, two isolation valves, a washing machine tap, did I miss anything? Definitely cheaper than a plumber.

    Vern0n
    Member

    What about the Carpenter? They can be pricey.

    I wouldn’t know mate, I do my own. Piece of piss that malarkey!

    I fit kitchens for a living and andyl has it the closest. Use whatever 40mm pipe you already have sticking out the wall though, if it’s push fit continue with push fit, if it’s solvent weld then continue with that. I will only use JG speedfit fittings, if the joint is made properly then almost impossible for leaks to occur. I’ve seen too many Polypipe ones leak.

    Premier Icon totalshell
    Subscriber

    love it.. two weeks ago we started the job and working from the back out started with my core drill for the waste.. left the hse to get my core drill came back to find the hse owner having pulled the stop end off and losing it under the cooker and unable to operate the stop tap.. water water everywhere.. let a bloke with plumber written on the van do it whilst you watch the telly

    andyl
    Member

    oh and pay attention to the black markings on the proper JG pipe – it is so you can tell it is inserted properly. ie cut the pipe exactly on one mark and you know when the next mark butts up to the end of the joint that it is home.

    Make sure you use the newer o-ring inserts and rotate the collar when it’s fully home to lock it in place.

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