Another wood burning stove question

Home Forum Chat Forum Another wood burning stove question

Viewing 25 posts - 1 through 25 (of 25 total)
  • Another wood burning stove question
  • Premier Icon woody74
    Subscriber

    I currently have a large victorian iron fireplace with a grate that can be fully removed leaving a large space. I want to install a log burner as most of the heat currently goes straight up the Chimney, but I don’t want to rip out the iron fireplace as it looks lovely and adds to the house.

    Can anyone see any problems buy just installing a log burner where the grate used to be. I will of course make sure it meets all the building regs.

    The only problem I can see is that for it to line up with the chimney it would need to have 2 x 45 degree bends in the flue (dog leg) straight from the top of the log burner.

    Thanks for any advice

    Premier Icon cb
    Subscriber

    Scale? Surely that would require a very small stove?

    Premier Icon woody74
    Subscriber

    I can get a stove up to 400mm wide. Something like a Stovax Stockton 3 or 4 would fit well. Just seems no one else has done this even when searching through Google, so made me think why?

    globalti
    Member

    It would look a bit of a bodge and as cb writes, you’d need a pretty compact stove. The cast-iron hoop should be easy to remove once you’ve found out how the mantle is attached to the wall; why not take it out and store it or move it to another room?

    In the end the best advice is the advice you’ll get from your friendly local chimney sweep. If you happen to be in the NW I strongly recommend Ian at Acorn Chimneys in Burnley, a star bloke altogether. A sweep will tell you what’s feasible and what’s allowed and will set your stove up for easy maintenance in the future.

    PS: If you are determined to go ahead, stoves like the Dovre 250 have a choice of top exit or back exit for the pipe, which should work OK if you can find a way to join it up to the existing flue.

    Premier Icon righog
    Subscriber

    The fireplace admittedly, looks good, but it’s gonna look pretty bad/odd with a woodburner stuck were the grate should be.

    Premier Icon kcal
    Subscriber

    tbh we had one like that in our house and the stonework in behind was pretty nice – ended up flogging the surround for a decent amount, stonework got cleaned up and repointed, looked quite pleasant.

    globalti
    Member

    It’s a very pretty hoop and you’ll get good money for it. Is it original?

    slowoldgit
    Member

    How close is it going to be to that wooden surround? That’s one potential problem. And how far will it extend forward? You need a fireproof base, like your stone, extending a specified distance in front.

    bone_idle
    Member

    Just rip out the fireplace and be done with it, otherwise it will not look quite. Personally I think its one or the other. I had a very similar fireplace to you, ripped it out and don’t miss it at all. At least you know the chimney works, a register plate/flue and you should be all sorted on the other hand you can fork out £1500 getting a liner stuck in it. The choice is yours.

    Premier Icon woody74
    Subscriber

    Im not going to go with a liner as the chimney is fine as it is used regularly and we know it does not leak. So far it seems just like a cosmetic issue as apposed to technical. Just feel a bit guilty taking original features out of the house. already had to rip out the sash windows as they needed lots and lots of repair work and were as draughty as a sieve

    bone_idle
    Member

    Yeah I know what you mean seems a shame to pull all the features, only thing is you might find it awkward to seal the flue into the insert/chimney. Give it a go you can always rip it out at a later date

    twinw4ll
    Member

    Fitting a reg plate is going to be a problem you will also need access to above the reg plate to remove soot that collects on it if not lining the chimney.

    The wooden surroud will have to go and not lining the chimney on a stove with a small output is a recipe for disaster, infact most modern stoves are designed by the manufacturers to go onto a lined chimney.

    You do not know if a chimney leaks unless you have had a pressure test, this is important because if c0 leaks to a bedroom the consequeces are dire.

    twinw4ll
    Member

    Yes, give it a go, just make sure all your insurance polices are up to date.

    Premier Icon woody74
    Subscriber

    Twin4ll

    Why is using a small stove without a lining a problem? I m confident the chimney does not leak as we have been living in the house for 5 years and use the fire regularly as well as getting it swept every year and have never had a problem. Chimney sweep always says the chimney are in great condition.

    Why would the wooden surround have to go? its far enough away for building regs. Well at least according to the quick scan I have so far had.

    twinw4ll
    Member

    I can assure you that if you fitted a solid fuel appliance in that fireplace it would not be to building regulations.

    I fit stoves for a living, a chimney fire with a closed appliance below can reach temperatures in excess of 1000 degrees, enough to damage brickwork, imagine your in bed asleep you have a chimney fire, enough heat is generated for the stove to glow red hot, fumes are now leaking into your bedroom and your wooden surround is on fire from radiation from the stove.

    A cursary glance at document j of the building is not really good enough for something that could put you and your family at unnecessary risk.

    warton
    Member

    twinw411

    why would you have a chimney fire, if you keep your chimney swept?

    Premier Icon Mugboo
    Subscriber

    And a meteor could hit the planet at any moment!

    trail_rat
    Member

    Burning wood creates gooey cresote – if you think your average nylon sweep brush removes that your mistaken. Unlike coal which creates easily sweepable soot.

    Which is often why folk with woodburners report back they hardly got any soot out their chimney when swept

    Throwing in some tri phsophate can dry out the goo and it can be swept better though.

    How ever i live on the edge and have a giant oak beam infront of my clay lined chimney above my multifuel stove.- as have all my family for the last 25 years.

    wrightyson
    Member

    So I think you have the answer…

    Premier Icon blastit
    Subscriber

    The good thing about having it in the room and not in an alcove is you will get a lot more heat off it.
    Another point is when you put a liner in your chimney it’s not a fit and forget option. Ours only lasted 7 years and it was buggered.
    We fitted it as it was leaking into the bedroom, and it was the smell again in the bedroom that alerted us to the fact it was buggered.
    So if you do or don’t fit a liner, looking after your chimney is the key.
    Smoke and co2 alarms would be good

    trail_rat
    Member

    And just to make a point excusing the decor of the previous owners , according to the sheet on the back of the door in the leccy cupboard – this once met standards – fack knows what they did but what i found in there was half a coal scuttle welded to a plate wedged im the chimney off centre and a kerb being used as a lintel.

    Obviously things were much more lax in the 90s

    you can have upto a 90deg bend in the entire length i.e. 2x45deg will be fine.

    The fireplace admittedly, looks good, but it’s gonna look pretty bad/odd with a woodburner stuck were the grate should be

    I agree. It’ll look awful

    sharkbait
    Member

    And I very much doubt your ‘Victorian’ cast iron fireplace has been there more than 40 years.
    Take it out, sell it and put the proceeds towards a liner.

    Premier Icon bedmaker
    Subscriber

    I’ve done a couple fairly similar to that by removing the back part of the cast fireback then digging out the rubble. I then made a plate to suit the front and fitted the Aarrow I400. Alows the cast suround to be kept.
    It obviously needs a liner though.

    That wood looks very close though, even with heatshielding I wouldn’t put one in there.

    I400 (not mine)

    What you say about the chimney not leaking is something I hear often from people with a perfectly working open fire.
    An open fire and a stove are very different beasts though and the state of the chimney for a stove is far more important.

    Don’t want to piss on your chips but sticking a freestander in front of that fire is a very bad idea for the various reasons described above.

Viewing 25 posts - 1 through 25 (of 25 total)

The topic ‘Another wood burning stove question’ is closed to new replies.