Another road question

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  • Another road question
  • Jamie
    Member

    50 mile = 1x 750ml bottle for me, and I’m shit.

    You don’t need as much as you think.

    globalti
    Member

    You’ll sweat less as you get fitter.

    Proper roadies don’t risk leaving their bikes outside shops or garages; they leave them outside cyclist cafes where they think they’ll be safe – e.g. the cafe in Scorton, Lancashire.

    Premier Icon iainc
    Subscriber

    If I am doing over about 30 miles without a stop then 2 bottles, otherwise just the one.

    Premier Icon scaredypants
    Subscriber

    For just over an hour, you don’t really need to drink at all. If you’re out for several hours you do need to maintain hydration pretty much from the start but not for an hour (or even two) IMO. Try rinking less and see what happens

    Hydrate before you go out

    (Wear a camelbak if you’re struggling; it’s not the roadie-crime it’s made out to be)

    TiRed
    Member

    One bottle per 30-50 miles depending on weather. My bike stays by my side. Even in cafes.

    Edit, for locking, I carry a very small Kryptonite Keeper 512 lock. It will lock three bikes to something for an “instant grab” attempt. Used it when we stopped for fish and chips on Brighton seafront for the club run.

    (I broke one with my bare hands once!)

    Premier Icon muddydwarf
    Subscriber

    Must admit, the lock thing is something i’m stressing about as i’ve my new Colnago arriving tomorrow and i’m wondering how to carry a lock – and where to find one that is both small enough and effective enough to lock up a bike for a few minutes.

    ojom
    Member

    Put the camelback under your jersey for extra aero benefit.

    mrmo
    Member

    depends on weather, did 135miles a month or so back, two standard bottles, stopped at a couple of garages to top up with water. and downed a can of coke somewhere in the forest of dean when i started to die.

    As for locks, never leave the bike out of site and more than a couple of seconds away at all times. If i do have to leave it more than a couple of seconds away, screw the gearing up before you leave it.

    butcher
    Member

    Two bottles (and a coffee stop) do me for most rides, anywhere up to about 70/80 miles. Electrolyte tablets or energy drinks help with hydration.

    It depends on a few factors: weather, effort, etc…but beyond 80 miles I can drink considerably more.

    I usually ride pretty remote areas and popping in to cafes and shops isn’t normally a problem because the only other people about are cyclists, walkers and the odd farmer. Have ran into petrol stations before though…plenty of eyes and cameras about.

    fubar
    Member

    I have something like:

    lock1

    or

    lock2

    …but I’ve never used it! Of course if you can cycle with someone you find a cafe with outside seating and take it in turns to pop in. Also round here there are quite a few snack caravans at the side of the road so you can grab a tea or can of Coke etc. May I suggest the Pavillion Cafe in the park in Hebden Bridge…it’s only small but you will never be more than a couple of meters from your bike.

    Premier Icon muddydwarf
    Subscriber

    I need a lock i can comfortably carry in a jersey pocket – any reccomendations?

    Premier Icon cynic-al
    Subscriber

    LOL at the “1 bottle for a century – in the Sahara” and “hydrate before you ride” crowd!

    Toasty
    Member

    I used to take two bottles out, now I just drink an entire water bottle before going out, and just take one. 40-60 sort of mile rides, 2-2.5 hours.

    Stick zero tablets in every bottle, go through a bonkers amount of it at the moment, doing a couple of hundred miles a week.

    fubar
    Member

    …of course those locks won’t stop anybody with even the simplest cutters but they might stop an opportunistic thief just jumping on and riding away.

    Premier Icon muddydwarf
    Subscriber

    Cheers fubar, something like that is what i’m looking for. I obviously won’t be leaving it unobserved for more than a couple of minutes even when locked, but i’ve a healthy fear of not locking my bikes up.

    Premier Icon scaredypants
    Subscriber

    go on then al – 3hr ride; what terrible fate would befall an initially well-hydrated rider who then went out and rode for 3hrs on 2x750ml ?

    Premier Icon iainc
    Subscriber

    Last week I was out for a 25 mile warm hilly ride and decided to extend it. Got home on about 45 a bit thirsty after one bottle with zero tab in, but could have done with more. As per earlier post, 30 miles per bottle is my average, always with a zero tab per bottle too.

    titusrider
    Member

    Ride with one to two bottles based on length of ride, 40m+ or v hot weather equals two bottles.

    On the topping up front use garages and cafΓ©s and leave whoever I’m with outside with the bikes. If I cant leave someone next to my bike I trust then

    I drop the chain off the chainrings so it wont pedal and
    Clip my helmet through the wheel (wrap the straps around a couple of times) to stop the wheels going round

    Imo the type of locks I would be willing to carry are no stronger than my helmet straps !

    Premier Icon Rusty Spanner
    Subscriber

    Some, that’s SOME roadies seem to think that there’s a kind of heroicism in riding without sufficient water.

    Like much established roadie ‘lore’, it’s pure bollocks designed to intimidate outsiders and make riding a bike as unpleasant as possible – something to be endured rather than enjoyed.
    See also unecessarily low stems & stupidly high gearing.

    I usually take two bottles.
    If you don’t need that much, so what? It’s not a race, is it?
    Better safe than sorry.

    And, as above, a small lock if on my own so I can fill up at pubs, caffs or petrol stations.

    IanW
    Member

    In the recent hot weather I can easily do in 5/6 bottles in a 80/90 miler and still be dehydrated as measures by my post ride weight.

    I go by the Sky advice, drink when your thirsty, drink when your not thirsty and drink when your not sure if your thirsty or not.

    On my own I would use a poundland lock perhaps but usually only stop in a rural general store type places which don’t present much of a theft risk or better still ride in a group.

    butcher
    Member

    Hydration beforehand definitely does help. My longer rides are generally early morning, and I always have to force it down a bit (same with my porridge – never had a big appetite in the morning), but usually don’t feel the need for a drink until about 20 miles in after that. Just don’t overdo it or you’ll be stopping every 20 mins for some relief…

    Premier Icon simmy
    Subscriber

    Been out tonight for just over an hour and done nearly 19 miles and feel lot more comfortable on the road bike so thanks to everyone on my last thread who gave me advice.

    This is probably a silly question but I’ve 2 water bottles on the bike and I drank one on tonight’s ride so, that would give me roughly 40 miles off 2 bottles.

    I’ve never seen a roadie with a lock and chain on their bike so how do they go about refilling ? Pop into a petrol station with the bike ?

    I think of the most random things and I’m probably drinking too much, but I’d like to go further. I can think of a “butty van” I could stop at but that’s about it without leaving the bike unlocked somewhere.

    TiRed
    Member

    If you ride to Windsor, don’t even think of leaving your bike. Anywhere! No lock you can carry on a road bike is resistant to our local scum, who are well tooled and immune to public opprobrium. The cable lock I carry will just about prevent the brazen snatch and ride of a collector’s item Β£9K Specialized road bike that took place in broad daylight at Eton Bridge outside a cafe in front of a group of riders last year.

    You’ve been warned…

    crikey
    Member

    Some, that’s SOME roadies seem to think that there’s a kind of heroicism in riding without sufficient water.

    Like much established roadie ‘lore’, it’s pure bollocks designed to intimidate outsiders and make riding a bike as unpleasant as possible – something to be endured rather than enjoyed.

    Then again, there are some who have realised and trained and ridden for long enough that we don’t need to drink our own body weight in electrolyte drink largely because we know that it’s just riding a bike. The ‘I must fill my 3 litre Camelbak to the brim for a lap of Llandegla’ crowd are equally at fault.

    The idea that one should carry enough fluid to ride a thousand miles is a strange one. Take a bottle, take two if you want to; in the UK you are always near enough to a shop or a garage or a house or a stream so you can get water if you really need to.

    I’m sure there are parallels with those who need to carry bottles of expensive water to walk around town, or those that need to visit Starbucks and carry a cup of coffee in order to function…

    Premier Icon Rusty Spanner
    Subscriber

    Then again, there are some who have realised and trained and ridden for long enough that we don’t need to drink our own body weight in electrolyte drink largely because we know that it’s just riding a bike.

    Who said you needed to do that?

    The ‘I must fill my 3 litre Camelbak to the brim for a lap of Llandegla’ crowd are equally at fault.

    At fault of what?
    Who do they harm?

    Take a bottle, take two if you want to; in the UK you are always near enough to a shop or a garage or a house or a stream so you can get water if you really need to.

    That’s what I said. πŸ™‚

    crikey
    Member

    Like much established roadie ‘lore’,

    Give us some examples of this hateful behaviour then..

    …and my top tip for refilling bottles is to stop at out-of-town petrol stations; buy a bottle of Coke/Pepsi and one of water and mix the two after de-fizzing the Coke; makes a fine sports drink.

    Premier Icon Rusty Spanner
    Subscriber

    Give us some examples of this hateful behaviour then..

    I did in my op. πŸ™‚

    Oh, and not carrying a saddlebag.
    That’s bollocks as well. πŸ˜€

    Premier Icon scotroutes
    Subscriber

    I’ve ridden with folk that seem to think they can’t pass a shop without buying more water and then spend an equal amount of time looking for somewhere to have a pee.

    On a 50 mile/3hr ride from home, I find one 750ml bottle to be sufficient. I might stretch to two for 75-80 miles. However, on a recent 26 hour trip I reckon I drank around 7 litres. That was un-naturally hot though and my consumption rate plummeted overnight when it was cooler.

    Premier Icon iainc
    Subscriber

    Why would you take a fizzy juice, shake it up to lose the fizz and then water it down before drinking it ? Sounds like a good waste of a nice drink to me πŸ™‚

    Premier Icon scotroutes
    Subscriber

    crikey wrote:

    in the UK you are always near enough to a shop or a garage or a house or a stream so you can get water if you really need to.

    Although it can be very difficult to source water during the night.

    crikey
    Member

    See also unecessarily low stems & stupidly high gearing.

    Is that it?

    See, in the past, old roadies used to race, so had bikes set up for racing, hence the low stem, and the gearing.
    Neither of which were obligatory.

    Premier Icon Rusty Spanner
    Subscriber

    Neither of which were obligatory.

    Shame they seem to forget that when answering newbie roadie questions on here πŸ˜€

    See any gearing/what should I carry on a road bike? thread.

    Toasty
    Member

    Oh, and not carrying a saddlebag.
    That’s bollocks as well.

    I love that you’re still bitter about rule #29 πŸ™‚

    (I sometimes use a saddle bag, don’t tell anyone though. It’s got rubbish velcro and it’s made my shorts go bobbly.)

    crikey
    Member

    Examples please.

    …and no, I don’t think you need to carry a saddlebag. I’ve never used one; that’s what pockets are for. If you use more than one road bike it would be a faff changing it over.

    Premier Icon Rusty Spanner
    Subscriber

    crikey – Member

    Examples please.

    …and no, I don’t think you need to carry a saddlebag. I’ve never used one; that’s what pockets are for.

    I rest my large Topeak Wedge case. πŸ™‚

    If you use more than one road bike it would be a faff changing it over.

    Honestly, if you find the clips or straps on saddlebags that confusing, I’d suggest that your slammed stem has restricted the flow of blood to your brain πŸ˜€

    Premier Icon muddydwarf
    Subscriber

    Well I’m having a mini saddlebag on mine πŸ˜›
    Mainly because i find a tube,chaintool,tyre levers,repair kit, wallet,keys, and phone a bit uncomfortable in my jersey pockets.
    Plus, it means the essential kit is always on the bike instead of at home on the windowsill.
    TBH i do this with both my camelbaks as well,each has a couple of tubes/multi tool/repair kit/chain tool/tyre levers etc so i know its always stocked.

    crikey
    Member

    πŸ™‚

    Lets start with a smiley….

    I don’t slam my stem. Equally I don’t try to ride a racing road bicycle like a bike I would ride to the shops, basket and all.

    I don’t use a saddlebag, or a saddlepack because I don’t need to. I tried one back in about 1990, but it fell to bits and I am capable of carrying the things I need without using a bag.

    In direct contravention of ‘the rules’, which are as anyone with intelligence realises, a humourous take on the idea of roadie seriousness, I also take a mini frame pump.

    Now, is anything else upsetting you?

    Premier Icon Rusty Spanner
    Subscriber

    Noooo, you want a Carradice Camper Longflap.
    Can’t fit a picnic blanket, paperback, camera, tripod, flask and binoculars in a mini saddlebag.

    Look nice on your Colonic, that.

    Crikey, thanks for the smiley, I was beginning to get worried there for a minute.

    As to ‘The Rules’, I’ve noticed that those who are the loudest in acknowledging their humourous intent are often the most ardent in their observance. πŸ˜‰

    crikey
    Member

    Noooo, you want a Carradice Camper Longflap.
    Can’t fit a picnic blanket, paperback, camera, tripod, flask and binoculars in a mini saddlebag.

    Oh, you’re a tourist… I see.

    Premier Icon muddydwarf
    Subscriber

    Ah, but my ‘colonic’ πŸ˜› isn’t a racing bike.

    Its a Gran Fondo bike, whatever the bloody hell that means!

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