Alloy wheels for cars – fitting

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  • Alloy wheels for cars – fitting
  • racing_ralph
    Member

    How do i know what wheels will fit – are they all the same (4 bolt ones for example).
    Want some alloys for the pug van and have seen some decent ones form a pug 406 – am i safe to assume they will fit with no adaptors or fettling?

    sparkywalts
    Member

    The answer to that is no

    You will never know if they fit unless you know the diameter of the alloys and what the wheels or your van are.

    racing_ralph
    Member

    how do i find that out? van is not here btw

    sparkywalts
    Member

    You will need to check on google. Just type in your van and state that you need to know the wheel spacing diameter.

    Then that should tell you.

    That is only half the battle then, you will then need to find alloys which fit that diameter which can be an arse unless you go to a company called wheelbas where they take your van details and drill the holes especially

    racing_ralph
    Member

    4×108 et15

    does this mean:
    4 stud
    108?? – what is that an indicator of?
    15″

    colnagokid
    Member

    No, it all depends on the wheel pcd and offset so as above you need to check.

    twohats
    Member

    PCD

    The term PCD stands for (pitch circle diameter) and is the diameter of a circle drawn through the centre of your wheels bolt holes. PCD is measured in millimetres and also indicates the number of studs or bolts the wheel will have.

    One of the most common fitment has 4 studs and a PCD of 100mm, hence the fitment 4×100. Check the fitment guide above to check the fitment of your car, if you are unsure please check with vehicle and wheel manufacturer before purchase and subsequent fitment.

    OFFSET

    Every car requires a unique offset. This is where the outside of the wheel needs to be in relation to the bodyline of the vehicle, realistically you can go 5-7mm outside these recommendations, but always check with vehicle and wheel manufacturer’ if you are unsure, as there are often other factors that need to be considered.

    hora
    Member

    108 is the distance between or circumference between the holes- this bit is CRUCIAL and must be the same. Offset can vary though. For instance I had an Aygo that had an offset range of 35-42 so you could wander within that range.

    I found 4 front MR2 alloys, used 4x5mm spacers and 16 bolts and hey presto I had MR2 alloys on an Aygo- mucho better than aftermarket rims!

    Another area that you will need to consider- the rim(?) width – i.e 6.5J, 7J.

    hora
    Member

    You will also need to consider tyre height remember:

    http://www.tyresave.co.uk/tyresize.html

    I’m considering a 2.5T Forester at the moment and one I found has some nasty Wanli tyres chucked on by the dealer that have a waaaaay too narrow sidewall height – they look diddy in the wheel arches. Keep posting/asking- it’ll make sense very soon!!

    Premier Icon PePPeR
    Subscriber

    All the 4 bolt Peugeot wheels are the same PCD, (the spacing for the holes in the middle). As long as you;re staying the same size of wheel, ie 14″ then you’ll be fine.

    racing_ralph
    Member

    they are stock 14″ steel rims – can i not have 16″ alloys with low pro tyres?

    hora
    Member

    RR- look up Pug OEM alloys and using the tyre save calculator- need to stick to the heights for various reasons, silliness and catching/rub on arches when going over bumps etc- I don’t see why you can’t have 16″ OEM pug alloys. These look great:

    http://cgi.ebay.co.uk/PEUGEOT-GTI-16-NIMROD-ALLOYS_W0QQitemZ140305318484QQcmdZViewItemQQptZUK_CarParts_Acc_Wheels_tyres_Rims_Car_Wheels_ET?hash=item140305318484&_trksid=p3286.c0.m14&_trkparms=72%3A1689|66%3A2|65%3A12|39%3A1|240%3A1318

    racing_ralph
    Member

    sure they will fit??

    hora
    Member

    Ask him for the PCD on them. Be prepared to let them go but browse/keep alookout. I waited weeks for the right MR2 alloys to come up on fleabay and they are currently in the boot of the Pug306 in my garden 😆

    Ps aftermarket alloys look awful/cheap on any car unless you go into stratoferric pricing aftermarkets IMO.

    petrieboy
    Member

    PCD must be 100% corret (unless you use wobble bolts, but you dont want to do that)
    offset you want to be pretty close
    if going for a larger rim, you want a lower tire to keep radius close, but so long as it’s not miles out, you’ll be fine (wheel size can vary depending on the factory spec of the car so no issues changing)
    generally wheels for a given manufacturer are interchangeable assuming the cars are of a similar generation and same layout

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