Viewing 40 posts - 41 through 80 (of 124 total)
  • A view from an occasional Mountain Biker
  • Premier Icon anagallis_arvensis
    Free Member

    Dropping people definitely is not and never has been a part of roadie culture, not sure why people would think that.

    I’ve never been on any club ride that hasn’t had a non-drop policy and any roadie club will make sure stragglers are looked after.

    The only exception maybe would be a chain-gang where its made explicit and clear from the start that if you can’t keep up the rest push on (or a race of course).

    This

    Premier Icon IdleJon
    Full Member

    Dropping people definitely is not and never has been a part of roadie culture, not sure why people would think that.

    How can you be sure that all clubs are the same? I’ve certainly been on club runs where nobody stopped for the droppees. It’s been over 15 years since I last did road club rides though, so maybe you’re all a bit nicer now. (I’m not bitter about being dropped somewhere in west Wales without a clue how to get home! 😂 )

    Premier Icon tjagain
    Full Member

    Its always amused me the amount of stuff some mtbers take with them for a couple of hours ride. Scotroutes is right that out in the big hills you need more but even then you simply do not need half the crap some folk carry – assuming of course your bike is well maintained.

    Premier Icon white101
    Full Member

    Today I rode 28 miles in the lakes, up and down all day long. My penny finally dropped on dropper posts big time, never gave them much thought before today and it just become so obvious.

    And I stopped plenty today because the scenery was to good not to stop and admire, all part of riding and being outdoors

    Premier Icon anagallis_arvensis
    Free Member

    How can you be sure that all clubs are the same?

    Nobody said that but it seems pretty obvious to me that a “club run” which is a ride to a cafe on a sunday is a no drop ride. Some of the faster ones can get feisty on the return leg but every one I’ve been on with a number of clubs will make sure any riders who dont know the route are looked after. Mrs Anagallis does club runs every week and she started doing them specifically so that she wouldnt be dropped and had people around to help in the event of a mechanical as she gained experience and confidence.

    Of course people do get dropped but mostly it occurs because no one noticed

    Premier Icon nickc
    Full Member

    Dropping people definitely is not and never has been a part of roadie culture, not sure why people would think that.

    Because it totally is part of roadie culture, that’s why. Your club may have a “no drop” policy, but then you’ve got to ask why your club has made a specific point about it…Every single road club I’ve ever ridden with has a ride that’s along the lines of “This is a fast run, if you get dropped you’re on your own” Sunday social runs might be different, but to pretend it doesn’t exist is nonsense TBH.

    Its always amused me the amount of stuff some mtbers take with them for a couple of hours

    This makes you sound like a smug know-it-all, what do you care what other people take on a ride?

    Premier Icon Hopk1ns
    Free Member

    Dropper post wars…tick
    Sram vs Shimano wars….tick
    Lycra vs baggy shorts wars….tick
    Mtbers stopping alot wars….tick

    TROLL POST ALERT, TROLL POST ALERT

    Premier Icon neila
    Full Member

    Mostly road for me now but 2 or 3 times a year I break out the 26″ BFe and hit the local trails or FoD to convince myself I can still shred. I have noticed groups of riders stopping on the trails between sections, not a problem, but why stop in the most inappropriate spot or right on the trail? Last time at FoD it was a nightmare.

    Premier Icon vickypea
    Free Member

    I’m primarily a mountain biker but I do a fair bit of road biking too. Most of my MTB is natural trails in the Peak District and my dropper post is brilliant for the constant undulations.
    I don’t wear my roadie Lycra on an MTB ride as it would be destroyed by muck and brambles.
    I use a bumbag these days, with spare tube, pump, emergency snack and phone. I don’t want a 3 hour walk home! Though going tubeless has been brilliant!
    Regarding stopping and starting, I like that from a social point of view as long as it’s not too frequent, or it spoils the flow. I also like to take time to stop and “smell the roses”- whether that’s to admire a view, watch the sun set, or look at something cool like a hare or barn owl. 😊

    Premier Icon argee
    Full Member

    Useless kit is only that until you need it, nothing in my bag isn’t there for a practical reason, the CO2 inflator, pump, inner tube, bacon strips are all for the flat tyre, which is the most frequent occurrence, either for me or one of the group, the multitool, leatherman and torx tool are the tools, again used pretty frequently, more often by others who think hitting an all day ride with water, pump and inner tube will keep them going all day.

    First aid kit is the bit used less frequently, but it’s had a fair few bandages, plasters, steri-strips, etc used over the last couple of years as well.

    Premier Icon matt_outandabout
    Full Member

    @Hopk1ns – I had that thought too…

    I think the op has related his judgement to a smaller trail centre, a fairly straightforward one and limited in his own experience there. It’s also a place that (brilliantly) attracts all sorts to ride.

    I do carry a bag, mainly it’s always packed and I ride natural trails, often away from other people, often into the hills. Experience tells me to avoid a long and cold walk home, taking some tools, a spare layer, water and a bite of food is worth it. Experience also tells me that my basic first aid kit is the reason a friend is still alive.
    Even this week I helped out a road rider who’s one co2 canister was used up as his one patch hadn’t worked – and he had a 12 mile walk back to a ferry home in about 6*c and lycra….

    Theres a lot of fashion influence on many bikers, hence the clothing. That said, I wear a baggier layer over Lycra as no-one needs to see the last turkey in the shop. Mountain biking can also be hugely hot then freezing cold. If your descents are a few hundred metres, that’s ok. If they’re a few km, maybe less so.

    Droppers are teh shizzle if you ride anywhere technical.

    As for comments about gear choice, each to thier own.

    Premier Icon argee
    Full Member

    As for the roadie vs MTB discussions which this always turns into, each to their own, i can’t comment on road biking, never done it other than commuting, i’m just not wired for doing miles on the road, probably because i have never been quick on the bike. But even i can understand there are many types of road biking, same with mountain biking, again choose what you enjoy, sample what you don’t to find out for sure.

    Premier Icon oldagedpredator
    Full Member

    Just stirring the pot a bit – that rides are explicitly labeled no drop suggests it’s part of the culture. Being slightly more sensible, having finally got over my suspicion of road clubs a couple of years back I joined a couple and have really enjoyed riding with them. I get a slightly different kind of riding from each. It’s just a case of finding a ones that suits. First one I joined was on most of the people in the photos looked my shape, mainly because I knew how unfit I was at the time. Done a lot of good rides and been inspired by people to try some things – never thought I’d be thinking 200miles in a day is a realistic target.

    For mountain biking I don’t think there is much wrong with wryly observing beards are back, bumbags are the new bike packs, bike packing is the new cycle touring, skinny action slacks are the new Ronhills and yet navigation seems to be as unfashionable as ever. Things move on but mostly just go in cycles. Maybe 2021 is the year the sleeping giant of MTBO / Bike-O awakes.

    I’m equally bemused and entertained by the great road disc debate or the only way is mitless is becoming a thing. Never mind the shouting of ewe boi by mountain bikers. I did think it was mew boi but apparently it is ewe. I am completely blown away by the stuff people ride – if not entirely comfortable with the amount of erosion that goes with it.

    There’s always room for a healthy amount of irreverence for the culture of cycling but maintaining respect for the challenges and achievements. It’s just case of trying not to pedal prejudice.

    Premier Icon crazy-legs
    Full Member

    Occasional MTBer here as well – it used to be the sole thing I did, raced XC for many years, had several MTBs and now it’s down to just the one (an ancient 26″ Cove HT) which comes out maybe half a dozen times a year for trail centre stuff. I like Leeds Urban Bike Park plus it’s done a couple of visits to the indoor Dirt Factory place in Manchester. The only time I can be bothered MTBing on normal trails now is if it’s snowed or, very occasionally, if it really is bone dry.

    Otherwise the CX/gravel bike does the biggest chunk of mileage, happy taking that on almost anything. And road is just easier – straight from the front door, 4hr ride. 100km, no need to then spend the rest of the weekend cleaning stuff!

    Dropping people definitely is not and never has been a part of roadie culture, not sure why people would think that.

    The traditional weeknight chaingang certainly used to be a thing but that was targeted at racers; social rides remained as exactly that. I did loads of them with the local road club when I was at uni but they gradually migrated onto the local outdoor velodrome due to traffic concerns. That way it became a social smashfest!

    Premier Icon jamj1974
    Full Member

    Apart from the obvious trail etiquette fails e.g. stopping mid-way through sections or blocking trails, I can’t see how much of the original post is really a problem…

    Its not surprising that the OP who is a self-admitted very occasional mountain biker in recent years, doesn’t really get dropper posts, looser clothes, legs au naturel, or carrying seemly over-loaded packs. For me though I’m not sure why it is worth noting? It comes across a little bit snobbish. I wouldn’t bother commenting on how the OP would be dressed, rides, or chooses to shave legs.

    As long as you are considerate – wear, ride what and how you want really…

    Premier Icon squirrelking
    Free Member

    As someone on the hairier end if the scale, lycra really is your friend (in mud).

    @tjagain

    assuming of course your bike is well maintained.

    Lolz. That’s a rather large assumption to make. I assume you have never had a mech caught in a branch or similar that would truly ruin a ride if you didn’t have some tools to keep you going?

    Premier Icon tjagain
    Full Member

    I carry what I need for the things that may happen. Multitool which I can strip the bike completely with and has a chain breaker. Some quick links and chain links, a tube and a pump and a repair kit, couple of cable ties. It all goes in a small frame bag.

    I do not need a rucksac to carry it all in. (In winter I do because I will have a spare layer / waterrproof if more than a few miles from home) but the amount of crap some folk carry is crazy – spend ££££ on lightening their bike then carry kilos of spares and tools and electronic devices.

    The only time I have had to walk home was a freehub failure due to the mighty thighs of powa!

    Premier Icon trumpton
    Free Member

    I always take loads of stuff with me, even on a local 45 minute ride. I hate walking with a bike. I still use tubes so take stuff for that as well to different multi tools and two pumps incase one fails as I once had.two tubes in case the hawthorns give me a double puncture and loads of water in case I want it.vaper and spare liquid.wallet phone and that’s about it.nothing like being prepared. I like it.

    Premier Icon ransos
    Free Member

    Because it totally is part of roadie culture, that’s why. Your club may have a “no drop” policy, but then you’ve got to ask why your club has made a specific point about it…

    The only ride I’ve ever been on where people were being dropped was MTB.

    Premier Icon vickypea
    Free Member

    In our club, the roadies never drop anyone. They say they love watching someone suffer so they won’t allow anyone to be dropped even if they beg to be dropped!

    Premier Icon jamj1974
    Full Member

    In my pack – I have pretty much what you carry TJ. I add to that a hydration bladder and first aid kit. Prefer hydration packs to bottles and I have used the first aid kit many times, more for other riders than myself. There’s only one ride you need to have where you find a fellow rider as a casualty and need to stop bleeding and use a survival bag – to know you aren’t carrying too much!

    Premier Icon tpbiker
    Free Member

    What I find strange about road riding is dropping people is a fundamental part of the culture.

    I don’t agree with that at all. Loads of club rides have a ‘no drop’ policy. The remainder are usually pretty clear on the types of speed expected to stay with the group. If you rock up to a group ride that states the average speed will be 20mph, and you can’t hold 20mph, then you can hardly expect the rest of the club to wait for you. Instead, you should have gone with the slower group. Folks aren’t actively trying to ride you out the group, which having a ‘dropping culture’ implies.

    That said, I’ve never been on a club ride when anyone has ever been dropped.

    Premier Icon molgrips
    Free Member

    I did a club run once (as a guest) where the group included some proper fast ex pros. It started slow and then gradually sped up through the ride dropping people along the way. Great fun!

    Premier Icon scotroutes
    Full Member

    A large Edinburgh based club used to have a reputation for dropping folk. I had a few folk in the shop complaining about it. It is possible things have changed.

    Premier Icon nickc
    Full Member

    The only ride I’ve ever been on where people were being dropped was MTB.

    anecdote, not data etc etc. The fact that so many of you have (including me) experienced clubs that specifically have a no drop policy kinda emphasises the fact that otherwise the expectation from riders is “oh, this is raod riding, I might be dropped” I think it stems from the fact that many road clubs have a racing heritage.

    but the amount of crap some folk carry is crazy – spend ££££ on lightening their bike then carry kilos of spares and tools and electronic devices.

    IME most folk are trying to drop as much weight from themselves and their bikes, I’ve come across vastly more folk who don’t have the equipment they need, rather than the opposite. Folk, I think, by and large, carry too much water, but that’s true of lots of folk who run or exercise. I think you’re projecting for effect to be honest.

    Premier Icon ransos
    Free Member

    anecdote, not data etc etc.

    No-one said it doesn’t exist, but it’s clear from this thread that it’s not the norm. My experience also demonstrates that it’s not unknown in MTB.

    Premier Icon choppersquad
    Free Member

    ^^^Definitely this.

    Premier Icon choppersquad
    Free Member

    ^^^This was meant for the comment on no one trying to kill you in a car….. I think I’m going a bit mad. It disappeared.

    Premier Icon anagallis_arvensis
    Free Member

    A large Edinburgh based club used to have a reputation for dropping folk. I had a few folk in the shop complaining about it.

    This supports the case that bits notv the general culture if people complain about it doesnt it?

    Premier Icon andykirk
    Free Member

    Some of the OP’s comments have just made me realise that Roadies v MTBers is almost exactly the same as Skiers v Boarders.

    Premier Icon tall_martin
    Full Member

    Dropping people definitely is not and never has been a part of roadie culture, not sure why people would think that.

    I’m mostly on the MTB and occasionally on the road. I went out with my mates mates. I was fully expecting to get dropped, they are competitive rodies and quick- I’m neither😀

    They dropped one of their mates because he was ill- he did say this at the start and say he might get dropped. I was pretty surprised.

    I was still with them at 50 miles. I said ” I’m surprised I’m still with you, I don’t think I could keep up if the pace was 1mph faster”

    ” Never say that ” said one of them, we set off 2 mph faster and I was very quickly dropped.

    Now I am not as fast as that bunch, and everyone knew that, I turned up expecting to get dropped and find my way home.

    I guess it’s the difference between riding with my MTB mates who are almost all non competitive and that bunch of rodies who are competitive and were in training for various races.

    Premier Icon trumpton
    Free Member

    I once got dropped on a mtb club group ride.was pretty scary as I did not know the area.luckily one of the riders held back a bit and let me catch up.really bad for the sport. That’s why it’s best to ride for fun not strava in group rides.its not proper mtbing and goes against its roots of having a blast with your mates.i guess riding with proper mtb mates is best.roadies who ride mtbs and mtbers who drop people are different from others.

    Premier Icon Nobeerinthefridge
    Free Member

    Its always amused me the amount of stuff some mtbers take with them for a couple of hours ride.

    Mibbe have deep fat fryers to lube their chains?.

    OP – Yep, modern bikes are great, ebikes even better. Dropper posts are awesome, agree about baggy clothes, I’ve no idea why folk wear effin massive shorts and tops, but then I’ve no idea why someone chucking their bike down trails for fun would wear lycra either. Well fitted clothing for the win.

    Massive bags, who cares, the stopping ditto, as long as it’s not on the trail.

    Mibbe you should ride somewhere decent, instead of Cannock! 😃

    Premier Icon trumpton
    Free Member

    Maybe we should just tolerate others even the wearing of lycra for mtb.all there for the same reason.

    Premier Icon stevextc
    Free Member

    You don’t see BMW owners considering raising their suspension do you?

    Raising or buying with the higher suspension out of choice?
    Mine eats miles then gets over rough tracks and cut down tree stumps at the other end which I’d never do with M Sport suspension.

    Premier Icon stevextc
    Free Member

    I took myself off to Cannock and hired a bike, a Trek Rosco hardtail, and had a couple of hours around The Dog and The Monkey.

    agree about baggy clothes, I’ve no idea why folk wear effin massive shorts and tops

    For me a “couple of hours around the dog and monkey” qualifies a helmet and 5 tens, gloves if its cold and maybe a water bottle if its hot and the frame accepts one.

    I’m constantly amazed by the amount of riding kit (worn and carried) at my local “couple of hours blast round swinley” and the helpful advice this kit seems to infer by those with it.

    Premier Icon molgrips
    Free Member

    Mibbe have deep fat fryers to lube their chains?

    No need, the lube lasts months 😉

    Premier Icon singletrackmind
    Full Member

    Road rules in my club are no one gets dropped. Free to sttack a steeper or longer hill as a solo off the front, just wait at the top gor a regroup.
    Anyone having a bad day gets 1 or 2 stronger riders as a windbreak and is towed back to the group.
    Some sprints for road signs and occasional through and off on certain roads where if you get spat out you wont get on but the rest will always wait before a junction a few miles up the road.
    Some of my speed group go up 1 gruop with the intention of hanging on as long as possible and being dropped. They then recover r and eventually we catch them up amd they can cope with 2mph less in our group. This is for training and speed work witj the aim of being able to stay with the fast boys longer each time and potentially stick with them ovef 40 plus miles

    Premier Icon footflaps
    Full Member

    Dropping people definitely is not and never has been a part of roadie culture, not sure why people would think that.

    Well you drop the weaker riders on the hills, stop at the top to let them get back on and then repeat for all subsequent hills. They’ll either get fitter quickly or stop turning up 😉

    I came back to road riding after 10 years off last year, my first group ride was horrendous, threw the towel in half way and limped home on impulse drive completely blown. A few weeks later, keeping up fine, a few months later setting the pace on hills shelling the others out the back 🙂

    Premier Icon trumpton
    Free Member

    I am glad I am not a roadie.sounds like a world of pain.

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